Young Talent Campaigns

Part
01
of two
Part
01

Young Talent Campaigns (1)

The “Lets Detroit” and “In Wisconsin” campaigns aim to improve retention of local workforce personnel, such as college graduates, within the targeted geographic areas (Detroit and Wisconsin). It was noted that many college graduates were leaving the states to work elsewhere, rather than keeping their talent in the local workforce. Job availability was not lacking, so the campaigns sought to identify additional retention techniques.

"Let's Detroit"

  • The “Lets Detroit” campaign aims to help professionals become aware of social activities, resources, and community engagement within the Detroit area. The "Lets Detroit" website allows persons to connect directly to other Detroit residents, view career opportunities in the area, find volunteering opportunities, view events and social activities, and learn about the various Detroit neighborhoods.
  • A 2018 article noted that 135,443 college graduates left Michigan upon graduation. However, 155,147 graduates came to Michigan from other areas, showing retention of current residents was a struggle.
  • 2019 still saw a continued shortage of Millennials in the Detroit workforce, specifically related to college graduates. Part of this concern has been attributed to the cost of college education, which prevents Detroit Millennials from completing their college degrees and entering the professional workforce.
  • Overall, metropolitan Detroit was one of the fastest-growing regions of Michigan in 2019, though this was attributed to residents moving from suburban areas to the urban areas of Detroit, rather than workforce retention. However, the "Let's Detroit" campaign assists Detroit residents in discovering the value of urban areas, which may have assisted in the overall urban growth.
  • In 2019, Detroit ranked 21st in the top 25 cities for millennial population, showing a growth of 2.2%. The "Let's Detroit" campaign may have assisted with this, though definitive proof of this has not been identified at this time.

"In Wisconsin"

  • Information specific to the “In Wisconsin” campaign was extremely limited, though it was noted that it attempts to improve and retain the population focused on housing and transportation needs.
  • Specific information and results of the “In Wisconsin” campaign had not been published publicly at the time of this research. As of July 2018, Wisconsin was noted as one of the slowest growing populations in the United States.
  • Wisconsin’s population is aging, as the primary population is from the Baby Boomers generation. Younger generations, such as Millennials, continue to leave Wisconsin despite the campaign to retain this population.
  • One area of success in Wisconsin is evident in Madison, Wisconsin. Madison, WI has attracted a stronger millennial population due to the favorable housing market and educational opportunities.

Need for Future Research

  • The campaigns of "Let's Detroit" and "In Wisconsin" are ongoing campaigns. As the campaigns are ongoing and relatively young for these types of projects, conclusive information regarding their success or lack of success is not available in the public domain.
  • Determining success of these campaigns in retaining local workforce, specifically Millennial, will be more evident with the 2020 census information. It is recommended additional research in these areas be requested when the 2020 census is published. The research team did not locate age-specific population updates for Detroit or Wisconsin since the initial report showing data from 2018.
  • Both Detroit and Wisconsin (specifically Madison, WI) demonstrate signs of early success in these campaigns through the relatively wide-spread dissemination of the campaigns through business organizations.

Research Strategy

To determine the effect of the "Let's Detroit" and "In Wisconsin" campaigns, in the absence of post-campaign data, we used sources addressing population changes in the identified areas. This information was used to draw conclusions addressing the research criteria. Both campaigns are ongoing, and information measuring their levels of success likely will be available after the conclusions of the campaigns. The strategy transcript noted a desire to focus on the Millennial population. Therefore, information regarding changes in Millennials in the workforce of the designated areas was utilized. Sources identifying trends in population changes, reasons Millennials cited for changing locations, and changes in opportunities to attract Millennials were utilized. A full census is due in 2020, which should provide additional information to add to the current available information.


Part
02
of two
Part
02

Young Talent Campaigns (2)

The "Just Say No to Winter" (San Diego, California) and "Visit For a Week, Stay for a Lifetime" (for Maine) campaigns both aim to attract workers from out-of-state. Both appear to focus on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) workers, though only San Diego targets millenials, in particular.

"Just Say No to Winter"

  • The San Diego Economic Development Corporation (EDC) established the "Just Say No to Winter" campaign in January 2019 to attract millenials from cold-weather cities to San Diego's job market, in the STEM sector in particular.
  • San Diego already had an unemployment rate at 3.2%, well below the national average, and 24.3% of its metropolitan area's population was millenials, the third highest such population of tech cities. However, 27% of business owner's were looking to hire at the time, and 58% found it difficult to find "qualified talent."
  • The initiative purposefully kicked off during the peak of winter in New York, Boston and Chicago. It focused on social media sites such as Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and YouTube with video contrasting harsh winters with the beauty of San Diego.
  • As the campaign only kicked off in January 2019, reliable statistics are not yet available to assess its impact. However, the EDC reported that the campaign saw 2.6 million social media impressions and 36,000 views of its videos.


"Visit For a Week, Stay for a Lifetime"

  • Maine's "Visit For a Week, Stay for a Lifetime" initiative began in June 2016 as an attempt to entice out-of-state vacationers to become permanent residents through a vacation expense reimbursement plan. It is at individual employers' discretion as to how much to offer potential employees from out-of-state.
  • The program is especially looking to attract information technology and healthcare workers. The program's website, contains a search engine for open jobs with participating companies.
  • In 2018, the campaign expanded "with outreach through the Turnpike Visitor Centers and geo-targeted social media ads."
  • Maine's population grew to 1.3 million, up 0.25% from 2017 an almost 1% since 2010. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, "Maine had the largest increase in median age this decade, going from 42.8 years in 2010 to 44.9 years in 2018, making it the state with the highest median age in the country."

Need for Future Research

  • Both campaigns are ongoing and relatively young, especially "Just Say No to Winter," which only began one year ago. As a result, conclusive evidence of these programs' respective impacts are not available in the public domain.
  • With regard to San Diego, relevant research would be with regard to initiatives to retain millenials already in the metropolitan area.
  • With regard, to Maine, the "Visit For a Week, Stay for a Lifetime" initiative is not targeted specifically to any age group. It would be worthwhile to research Maine's student debt relief initiatives meant to both retain and attract young talent.

Research Strategy

In the absence of post-campaign data, we first used sources to determine the intention and scope of the campaigns. In the case of Maine, population data was found to determine any trend over the period. As the "Just Say No to Winter" is only a year-old, its impact has yet to be evaluated, although we were able to find statistics with regard to its social media penetration. As both campaign age, we expect that more information evaluating the programs will likely be available. Census and labor statistical data are available in each case. However, it would take much time to devise statistical studies to independently attribute any population or workforce effects of either campaign.
Sources
Sources

From Part 02