Working Hourse C-Suite Executives

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Working Hours C-Suite Executives

C-suite executives, in most cases, arrive at the office at 8:15 a.m. and then leave at 5:30 p.m., according to a survey. With this information, it can be estimated that C-suite executives usually spend 9 hours and 15 minutes of their day in the office, with this amount of time inclusive of work breaks. While there are a few high-ranking executives who spend more time in the office, most high-ranking executives who have shared their daily routines with the public spend around nine hours in the office.

Typical Work Schedule of Business Leaders

  • In 2014, Entrepreneur contributor John Rampton teamed up with Chris Stowell, a vice president at the International Center for Management and Organization Effectiveness, to poll C-suite executives at Fortune 500 companies.
  • They sent questions to 267 C-suite executives and received 163 responses. Among the companies that responded were Adobe, American Express, AT&T, Bank of America, Boeing, BP, Delta, DHL, Federal Express, GE, Google, HP, John Deere, Johnson & Johnson, Kelloggs, Motorola, Rio Tinto, and Twitter.
  • Survey results show that C-suite executives typically arrive at the office at 8:15 a.m. and then leave at 5:30 p.m. This information suggests that C-suite executives typically spend 9 hours and 15 minutes in the office. This amount of time is inclusive of work breaks.
  • A study by the Harvard Business Review, however, shows that on weekdays, chief executive officers work an average of 9.7 hours, which translates to 9 hours and 42 minutes.
  • An article published by the Western Governors University also indicates that a typical chief information officer would arrive at the office at 7:30 a.m. and then leave at 6:00 p.m. This suggests that a typical chief information officer would spend around 10 hours and 30 minutes in the office.

Examples of Business Leaders and their Respective Work Schedules

1. Chief Information Officer

  • Soo-Jin Behrstock, AG Jeans and Koos Manufacturing's chief information officer, leaves for work at 8:15 a.m. and starts work at the office at 9 a.m. She then leaves the office at 6 p.m. This information suggests that Behrstock typically spends around nine hours in the office.
  • David Bray, chief information officer of the Federal Communications Commission, arrives at the office at 8 a.m. and then leaves at around 8:15 p.m. This information suggests that Bray typically spends 12 hours and 15 minutes in the office.
  • Helen Arnold, chief information officer of SAP, arrives at the office at 8:00 a.m. and then leaves at 6:00 p.m. This information suggests that Arnold typically spends nine hours in the office.

2. Chief Operating Officer

  • Molly Gravholt, chief operating officer and chief financial officer of Community Health Charities, heads to the office at around 8:15 a.m.
  • Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer of Facebook, arrives at the office at around 7 a.m. and makes sure she leaves the office at exactly 5:30 p.m. This information suggests that Sandberg typically spends 10 hours and 30 minutes in the office.

3. Chief Marketing Officer

  • Stephanie McCarty, chief marketing and communications officer of Taylor Morrison, heads to the office at around 9 a.m. and leaves the office at around 5 p.m. or 6 p.m. This information suggests that McCarty typically spends around nine hours in the office.

4. Information Technology Decision Maker

  • An example could not be provided, but considering that chief information officers remain the highest-ranking information technology decision maker, it is likely that the information technology decision maker and the chief information officer more or less have similar work routines or schedules.

5. Other High-Ranking Executives

  • Edmund Reese, senior vice president and head of investor relations at American Express, typically arrives at the office at 7:15 a.m.
  • Dani Dudeck, chief communications officer of Instacart, is typically at work by 9 a.m. She leaves the office no later than 6 p.m. This information suggests that Dudeck typically spends around nine hours in the office.
  • Alison Elworthy, a senior vice president at HubSpot, typically leaves work at 5:30 p.m.
  • Chinwe Esimai, chief anti-bribery officer of Citigroup, is "usually in meetings as early as 8 a.m."
  • Mary Barra, chairman and chief executive officer of General Motors, is usually at the office by 6 a.m.
  • Indra Nooyi, chief executive officer of PepsiCo, heads to the office at around 7 a.m.
  • Nadia Boujarwah, chief executive officer of Dia&Co, is typically at the office by 8 a.m.
  • Dan Reich, chief executive officer of Troops, strives to arrive at the office before 8:30 a.m.
  • Ryan Williams, chief executive officer of Cadre, tries to be in the office before 8:30 a.m.

Research Strategy

Since the goal is to understand whether C-suite executives and IT decision makers stay in the office after hours and come in early for work, we started by checking whether articles or reports about these executives' daily routines or day-to-day work schedules have been published in the past 24 months. It is possible that some executives have been polled or interviewed about this, so we looked especially for surveys and interviews. While this initial strategy did not uncover any comprehensive studies of high-ranking executives and their daily routines, it led us to a number of articles that offer a few helpful insights. Articles published by Thrive Global, IR Magazine, Dr. Ely Weinschneider, Medium, Becker's Hospital Review, Harvard Business Review, and Business Insider, for example, indicate when certain high-ranking executives reach and leave the office.

These executives are not necessarily representative of most high-ranking executives, however, so we tried to look beyond recently published sources for information. This change in tactics led us to four helpful sources, the most helpful of which was a survey conducted in 2014. The survey examined the day-to-day schedule of C-suite executives at Fortune 500 companies. The other three helpful sources, which were published by Business Insider, CIO.com, and YouTube between 2015 and 2017, provide information on the daily routine of certain CIOs. Given that it is highly unlikely for the day-to-day schedules of C-suite executives to change drastically in just a span of a few years, we assumed that the information provided in these sources are still relevant today. Also, since most of the sources uncovered by our first strategy were about how C-suite executives achieve work-life balance, we figured that this survey, although published in 2014, is more reliable and less biased.

In computing the number of hours the C-suite executives spend in the office, we considered only the time they typically arrive at the office and the time they typically leave the office. We did not see the need to exclude work breaks because we knew it is more important to show whether these executives arrive early and stay late at the office for work.

Regarding the information technology decision makers, we were unable to locate any data as to when they reach and leave the office. People are apparently more interested in the day-to-day schedules of C-suite executives than those of technology decision makers. The lack of information may also have something to do with the fact that the highest-ranking technology decision maker is typically the CIO, who is already included in the C-suite.
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