Workforce

Part
01
of two
Part
01

Workforce Percentages - Shift Workers: United States

After conducting an in-depth search on the percentage of the United States workforce that are shift workers and the economy they drive, we were able to establish that an average of 13.33% of workers in the United States worked outside the normal 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM working schedule. However, we were unable to identify how shift workers have driven the United States economy.

Methodology

First, we tracked the information from the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and collected the number of United States workforce that are shift workers. The source that we found presented the percentage of employees working on the main job based on hours. To identify the percentage of shift workers, we determined the average percentage of each hour outside 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM. We presented this data as one of the findings of the percentage of the United States workforce that are shift workers. However, this percentage did not represent the relevant number, and the data provided was old. We decided to enrich the findings by including the percentage from other references.
We located the information of shift workers but could not find results associated with the percentage of shift workers. Therefore, we used alternative queries such as the United States shift workers reports, United States shift workers reviews and the likes. We found the reports from ILO, EPI research institute, and the World Economic Forum. Some sources were including the percentage of shift workers in the United States. The finding from the EPI research institute also revealed the percentage of hourly paid workers and the full-time salaried that were also shift-worker. To complete the findings, we tried to locate the data of the United States economic value driven by shift workers. Regrettably, we could not identify the related information about this data.

We initially investigated the information from the United States Labor services and compared information from research institutes such as EPI, McKinsey, and New American Economy. We were able to capture some data of shift workers in the United States such as the percentage of shift workers and the proportion of hourly-paid and full-time employees. Nevertheless, there was no information associated with the economic impact of shift workers. We extended our search and used alternative queries such as 24/7 economy and irregular schedule workers. We expected to find the data of GDP and other economic indicators associated with those terms. Unfortunately, we could not find any indications of the economic impact of shift work in the United States. Most of the results we got were related to the health impacts of shift working schedule in the United States. We found some pieces of literature from papers published on the JSTOR or Princeton University but they were old and did not mention any number related to the economy.
We broadened the query to the economy by including terms such as research of shift working and shift work reports. We found some findings from T-Sheets that described the number of economic losses resulted from shift working practices. However, these reports might not be exactly the same as the economy driven by shift workers. Nevertheless, because of the closest association with the economy, we decided to include the data from T-Sheets to enrich the research findings.

Percentage of the shift workers in the United States

An average of 13.33% of workers in the United States worked outside the normal 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM working schedule from 2011 to 2014, according to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. Around 13% to 19% of employees in the United States took an irregular/on call, a split, or worked on a rotation work schedule every year. This is according to reports by the International Labour Organization. About 17% of employees in the United States have to work with unstable work shift schedules according to the EPI Briefing Paper. According to the New American Economy, around 30.2 million employees in the United States work outside the traditional set hours of 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM. This is an equivalent of 19.2% of the United States workforce.

Full-time and hourly shift workers

Around 16% of workers who are paid per hour in the United States are working shifts. This is according to the EPI Briefing Paper. Around 12% of employees on a salary in the United States work shifts.

Economy and shift workers

Working shifts and having off-hours resulted in employees receiving an 11% to 13% increase in pay, compared to the traditional work schedule. Employees might lose up to 7% of the minimum wage by working shifts.
Part
02
of two
Part
02

Workforce Percentages - Hourly Workers: United States

Economic growth is greatly associated with overall workers' productivity. Hourly workers composed more than half (58.5%) of the total workforce in the United States and they contribute significantly to the economy of the country. Below is the breakdown of our findings.

Methodology

To provide an answer to the research request, our initial search was to search for both quantitative and qualitative data that directly answer the request. Firstly, we search through government websites such as U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) site to identify the percentage of hourly workers in the United States and also other relevant information regarding the hourly workers, our search was successful in identifying the percentage of hourly workers in the last three years, but unfortunately, we could not retrieve figure or ratio/percentage for how much of the economy hourly workers drive. Information retrieved here was basically about the percentage of hourly workers (58.5%), their earnings per hours, minimum wage, education level, and so on.

Next, we searched through various media reports and news outlets to identify the figure or ratio/percentage of how much of the economy hourly workers drive, but this search was not successful. The reports we found here revealed that hourly workers are the "major drivers" of the economy in the United States and we also found the percentage of hourly workers to corroborate previous findings.

Next, we extended our search to look through various business reports, financial reports, annual reports, and so on to identify the figure or ratio/percentage of how much of the economy hourly workers drive, but unfortunately, this search was not successful. Information we found here was generally about the impact of hourly workers on the economy and the financial benefits they are entitled to. Therefore, information concerning the figure or ratio/percentage for how much of the economy hourly workers drive could not be retrieved on public data. This could be as a result of the lack of publication of such information on public data. We have provided below the details of our findings.

Percentage of Hourly Workers in the united states

In 2018, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported that 81.9 million workers between the age of 16 and above are hourly workers, representing 58.5 percent of the total workforce in the United States. Also, in 2017, it was reported that 80.4 million workers between the age of 16 and above are hourly workers, representing 58.3 percent of the total workforce in the United States. In addition, it was reported that more than 78 million Americans, or nearly 59% of the total workforce, were paid hourly in 2016.

How much of the economy Hourly workers drive in the united states

Economic growth is strongly related to workers productivity and output. A report revealed that hourly workers are the major driver of the economy in the United States. Also, among hourly workers in the United States, 434,000 workers earned exactly the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour. In a survey by the Society of Human Resource Management, participants reported that the turnover of average annual income for hourly workers was 49 percent, at an average cost of $4,969 per employee. In addition, it was also stated that there is a rapid annual increase of 39 percent for hourly workers and a 314 percent increase in turnover for managers.
Another report also revealed that higher hourly wages for low and middle-wage workers, incorporated through a variety of labor market policies, would generate savings in the government safety revenue and "income-support programs," which could facilitate economic growths. Also, workers working per hour are entitled to various benefits such as "overtime payment" which in return will increase their net income, as well as impact positively on the economy. However, hourly workers in the United States are more than salary employees and they are regarded as the major contributor or major driver of the economy in the United States.

Sources
Sources