Water/Wastewater/Water Recycling - Beverage Industry: US

Part
01
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Part
01

Water/Wastewater/Water Recycling - Beverage Industry: Global

A search through online databases reveals an overall general view of the methods that beverage companies are using concerning wastewater and water recycling and reuse. These include: working with state and local agencies and governments to establish safe water treatment protocols and water practices, reusing the treated water again themselves and having it put back directly into the ecosystem or community, developing ways to treat their own wastewater themselves, and even finding novel ways to reuse the wastewater, such as having it transformed into a useful biogas.

What Beverage Companies are Doing About Water, Wastewater, and Water Recycling/Reuse

  • Many beverage companies are working alongside local municipalities and state governments to have their wastewater treated adequately and either sent back to the company or back to the environment and ecosystem or the communities themselves.
  • Many of the beverage industry leaders have even begun to implement their own wastewater treatment facilities to have the water be recycled for use or to be sent back to nature and communities at safe and acceptable standards. To do this, some companies have established a system of locally-concentrated, diverse water initiatives, which are created through cooperation with third-party partners, local communities, and governments. The initiatives/projects typically "grow out of source water vulnerability assessments (SVA)" that each business performs, and the SVAs develop regulatory, social, and environmental risks inventories to water various sources that are helping to supply each facility as well as the surrounding communities.
  • These major companies investing large amounts into their sustainable water management goals, such as Coca-Cola, which has invested around $1 billion towards their wastewater treatment projects at their facilities, have launched company-wide initiatives and have publicly announced their intentions for many others to follow suit. For example, PepsiCo employs water stewardship by expanding access to safe water or enhancing water-use efficiency at various farms, as well as manufacturing facilities, to help it restore water in specific areas, namely regions where the company operates or those that are at risk the most.
  • Some beverage companies within these initiatives have started to work with experts outside of their company, in order to measure and evaluate the levels of toxins in the water and the differing water qualities. Also, seeking the advice of governments around the world and reviewing their regulations on how they deal with wastewater, they are modeling their own company systems likewise.
  • Increasing awareness of environmental issues that deal with all aspects of water waste through education and initiatives is a step that many companies feel is important in their sustainable water management goals. PepsiCo promotes the use of smart water standards, provides some best practices and data with its stakeholders, and utilizes training and public education for communities, as well as consumers.
  • Working with outside agencies that assess safe local water use and sourcing practices is a common action taken by beverage companies who are trying to be sustainable in their water management. PepsiCo India partnered with Alternative Development Initiative (ADI), which operates as a development support organization, to conduct water assessment mapping of the company's plants in which it develops priority water resources (e.g., temporary dams, community pods) that can be utilized for rejuvenation. It also collaborates with state governments to help treat wastewater bodies in order to make the water suitable for irrigation.
  • A growing trend amongst sustainable water practices by beverage companies is to have the water either converted within the company or outsourced and then returned, transformed into a biogas that can directly fuel the company's energy demands or even the communities.

Part
02
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Part
02

Water/Wastewater/Water Recycling - PepsiCo: Global

PepsiCo has a 2025 sustainability goal, which involves measures to conserve and protect the environment, including what the company is doing surrounding water, wastewater, and water recycling/reuse, globally. For example, PepsiCo plans to support about 25 million people to access safe water by 2025. Below are explicit details on the request.

Insights

  • According to Forbes and PepsiCo press release in 2018, the company increased the access to safe water to about 16 million people worldwide who live in areas that have less/no water, including 10 million people in India. PepsiCo projects that by 2025, it would be supporting 25 million people to access safe water. It has invested $40 million in this program.
  • Still, in 2018, PepsiCo awarded a $4.2 million grant to WaterAid, an international water and sanitation non-governmental organization, so that it can provide clean water access to communities living in southern India, specifically in Kerala, Karnakata, and Andra Pradesh.
  • On June 14, 2018, PepsiCo awarded a $2 million grant to China Women's Development Foundation so that it can support its "Water Cellar for Mothers-Green Village" program initiative. This initiative aims to improve the quality of drinking water in rural areas of China. By 2025, this program could provide access to safe water to over 10 million people living around Danjiangkou Water Reservoir, China.
  • To reduce waterwaste, PepsiCo has partnered with The Nature Conservancy (TNC) to conserve and protect freshwater. To achieve this, they are working closely with landowners, farmers, communities, and businesses throughout Latin America, South Africa, and the United States to initiate effective methods of conserving water, such as protecting upstream forests, efficient irrigation technology, among others. They are also implementing Water Funds to replenish at-risk watersheds.
  • In Latin America, 2018, the above partnership was able to replenish over 76 million gallons of water to the 6 watersheds in Sao Paulo, Bogota, Guatemala, Monterrey, and Mexico City through watershed conservation projects across over 990 acres. This project is still ongoing, and the amount invested in it is $3.1 million. Also, this can positively impact 41 million people living and working around watersheds.
  • In 2019, PepsiCo India won a U.S. award for saving 17 billion liters of water through its water programs, such as sustainable farming initiative in India, and replenishing over 5 billion liters of water through programs, such as Sustainable Water Resource Development and Management Program. This has positively impacted 60,000 people in India.
  • PepsiCo's Frito-Lay facility in Arizona treats and recycles around 648,000 gallons of water per day from the manufacturing process; this is, it recycles about 75% of process water within the facility. This has enabled the company to reduce its annual water use by 100 million gallons and its operational water use per unit of production by 26%. Additionally, this saved PepsiCo over $80 million between 2011-2015.
  • At PepsiCo's Gatorade facility, the company began investing in water efficiency practices a few years ago. Here, instead of using water to clean bottles, it began using air to remove particles from sterilized bottles. This has saved PepsiCo around 100 million gallons of water every year, which translates to $1.5 million being saved annually. Also, another water-saving method being used by the facility is a more efficient filtering and recycling process, which allows dirty water to be recaptured and cleaned again. With this, PepsiCo now saves 87% of water, which is then reused within the facility.
  • In Kasur district, Pakistan, PepsiCo taught the local potato farmers about sustainable farming through an event called "Sustainable Farming Program Roadshow”. The company encouraged them to employ best practices when farming, such as using new technologies, plant protection techniques, efficiency irrigation systems like the use of HEIS, among others. By the end of 2017, PepsiCo had helped these farmers conserve about 1 billion liters of water by using HEIS on their farms.
  • PepsiCo's 2025 sustainability goal is to achieve a 25% improvement in water use efficiency at its manufacturing facilities. It plans to accomplish this by reusing water in high-water-risk areas and ensuring that 100% of wastewater from its operations meets its high standards for the protection of the environment.

Research Strategy

To find information about the request, your research team utilized various publicly available sources ranging from PepsiCo's press releases to third-party websites, such as Forbes. From these sources, the team was able to compile 10 pieces of information, data, and/or statistics surrounding this topic.
During the search, the team could not find the amount of money PepsiCo invested in "Sustainable Farming Program Roadshow in Kasur district, Pakistan. To look for this data, your research team went through the company's official website and third-party websites, such as Nation. Nevertheless, no information relating to the amount of money spent by PepsiCo could be found in the public domain. Also, the team utilized sources from 2016 because they have information on how PepsiCo manages to conserve and reuse water at one of its facilities in Arizona. Finally, each bullet above has been supported by at least two sources.

Part
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Part
03

Water/Wastewater/Water Recycling - FIJI Water: Global

FIJI Water has not invested in sustainable water projects, but has donated funds to research into improved plastics in anticipation of altering the bottles it currently uses. FIJI Water also engages in efforts to improve the sanitation on Fiji Island. The parent company, Wonderful Co., has donated to several charitable organizations, but no annual report detailing company financials or activities is available.

No Evidence of FIJI Water Action to Save or Reuse Water

  • FIJI Water's website offers the following claim: The company shares "Fiji's sustainable ancient artesian aquifer with the world and work[s] to improve the lives and environment of its people...."
  • However, nothing on the website indicates that FIJI Water is taking any actions to save or reuse water specifically for its manufacturing operation.
  • According to TheShelbyReport.com, Fiji Water is a subsidiary of The Wonderful Co. The Wonderful Co. claims to have "a broad commitment to sustainability, including $400 million invested in water-efficient irrigation systems, ecofriendly pest control and creative ways to reduce energy use."
  • The Wonderful Co. is owned by billionaires Stewart and Lynda Resnick, of Los Angeles.
  • The Wonderful Co., produces the products Pom Wonderful, Wonderful Pistachios, and Wonderful Almonds. Water-efficient irrigation systems are installed in the company's pistachio and almond groves. The water comes from the Kern Water Bank that the Resnicks control. It was constructed in 1999 with public funds.
  • The FIJI Water company has helped communities on the island of Fiji with water sanitation. But no investments have been made in wastewater purification, water recycling, or water reuse. The company started The FIJI Water Foundation in 2007 to help with projects on the island.
  • FIJI Water claims it has helped preserve rain forests, helped fund water and sanitation projects, and supported kindergarten programs on Fiji. In January 2009, "after catastrophic floods swept the main island of Viti Levu, the company ... donated $500,000 to the military regime for flood relief, and gave another $450,000 to various projects" in 2008.
  • The LA Times described the company this way in a 2019 article: "Transporting water in bottles to places that already have access to abundant water — such as most of the U.S. — is wasteful on a mindboggling scale."
  • The company says it is working on plastics research. In early 2020, FIJI Water announced "a multifaceted initiative to transform its use of plastic while promoting a circular economy. The plan is highlighted by an aggressive timetable to make all plastic bottles from 100% recycled plastic PET by 2025, with 20% rPET in bottles next year. "

No Annual Report Available for the FIJI Company

Other Charitable Activities of the Wonderful Co.

  • In September 2019, Stewart and Lynda Resnick made a $750 million "pledge to ... science and engineering institute Caltech to fight climate change." The purpose of part of the research is to "focus on decomposable plastics, along with tackling issues of water, energy, food and waste in a world confronting rapid climate change." No further information about the research has been disclosed to date.
  • Part of the gift will be used to construct a new building to be named the Resnick Sustainability Resource Center.
  • According to 2018 promotional materials, "The company has a long-standing commitment to corporate social responsibility, including nearly $200 million invested in environmental technologies and sustainability research, $45 million in charitable giving and education initiatives every year, $80 million toward the construction of a new charter school campus in California’s Central Valley, and innovative health and wellness programs, including two new, free primary care clinics for employees and their dependents." This information could not be independently verified.
  • In 2017, Wonderful Co. donated $100,000 to Save the Elephants.
Research Strategy
We looked for information on FIJI Water and the Wonderful Co. water research and financial reports through market research and industry websites such as incfact and hoovers, as well as on the corporate websites, hoping to find evidence that water research, recycling, purification, or reuse was actually being conducted. We did not find any evidence. The privately held companies did not disclose their income or expenses, other than the lists of charitable dollar amounts contributed for the causes they support.
Part
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Part
04

Water/Wastewater/Water Recycling - Rebbl: Global

Rebbl does not have any initiatives regarding wastewater and water recycling or reuse. However, the company supports various initiatives that promote access to water for its grower communities, as well as, other vulnerable communities in the world. Similarly, the company promotes water conservation through its impact sourcing and regenerative agricultural practices. Below are more details about the company's water initiatives and company mission.

Rebbl's Mission

  • Rebbl was formed as a sustainable way of combating human trafficking and exploitation through providing vulnerable communities with a dignified source of livelihoods. The company develops various natural beverages from ingredients sourced from these vulnerable communities.
  • Rebbl offers 2.5% of its net profit (for every bottle sold) to Not For Sale. These funds are used in initiating measures to combat human trafficking and elevating the lives of survivors of this vice.

Water Initiatives

  • Rebbl's donations to Not For Sale (NFS) have assisted the organization to establish various water projects around the world. For example, in 2017, NFS setup a clean water system for a school in Santa Teresita, Peru. Additionally, the organization strives to install clean water in the homes of indigenous people.
  • Rebbl promotes water conservation through its use of plant proteins in its beverages. The company believes that proteins derived from plants ultimately require less water in their cultivation than the amount of water that is used up in rearing animals.
  • Part of Rebbl's mission is to uplift the lives of its grower communities. The company does this through various projects aimed at providing basic human needs like access to clean water, education and health care.
  • Rebbl's climate change strategy incorporates impact sourcing and regenerative agriculture. The firm sources "wild-harvested Brazil Nuts [which] incentives the protection of old-growth Brazil Nut trees and preservation of the Amazon Rainforest." Coupled with this, the company supports regenerative agricultural practices which allow the forest to heal itself by limiting human interference, leading to thriving ecosystems with the rainforest.

Research Strategy

In order to gather findings on Rebbl's initiatives regarding water, wastewater and water recycling or reuse, your research team employed a number of research techniques. We began by thoroughly reviewing the company's website, blog and reports. Through this exercise we gained some insights on the company's initiatives revolving around water. However, there was no data related to wastewater or water recycling. We shifted our attention to the company's non-profit partner — Not For Sale. Here we gleaned on information regarding the non-profit's programs that touch on water access. Still, there were no details on Rebbl's water recycling or wastewater practices. Consequently, we expanded our search to include news coverage featuring interviews with the company's executives in various industry publications that include: ForceBrands, FoodBev and Beverage Industry Magazine among others. Unfortunately, this technique did not yield any information on Rebbl's wastewater and water recycling programs.





Part
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Part
05

Water/Wastewater/Water Recycling - Red Bull: Global

Red Bull, GmbH, is working towards sustainability in some ways, however they do not publish any sustainability reports concerning water, wastewater, or water recycling for any of their plant locations.

WATER SUSTAINABILITY EFFORTS

  • China has a large distribution network of Red Bull; here they have entered a purchasing agreement with Emefcy Group to help address their wastewater issues.
  • A factory owned by Red Bull moving into Thailand has locals concerned because of water levels already being low and the factory's production of wastewater.

RED BULL COMPANY INFORMATION

  • Red Bull's main ingredient is water that is sourced from springs in Austria and Switzerland.
  • The water sustainability reports for water, wastewater, and water recycling are not published.
  • Red Bull is a private company so they do not have to produce a Corporate Social Responsibility report; there is no shareholder pressure to engage in such a report.

RESEACH STRATEGY

The first research strategy used was to check the Red Bull website for their sustainability plan/process. The idea here is information straight from the source would be most reliable. Other companies have readily made available their sustainability reports, so it was reasonable to assume Red Bull would as well, however Red Bull does not publish the water footprint of their operations. The second research strategy was to search the Environmental Protection Agency website and other sustainability sites to determine if Red Bull has any mentions on how they handle their water, wastewater, and water recycling. This was a logical step in the research process because when searching on these specific sites, most businesses will have a site profile that describes their sustainability efforts; Red Bull does not have a profile on the Environmental Protection Agency website and on other websites it’s states the same information about can recycling and CO2 emissions, but there is no information about water sustainability. The third step was to determine what kind of company Red Bull is to see if they are required to submit a yearly Corporate Social Responsibility report, but because they are a private company, they are not required to be engaged in these reports. Red Bull is a GmbH; in German this stands for "Gesellschaft mit beschränkter Haftung which translates to "company with limited liability." This suffix is used after a private company’s name.
Part
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Part
06

Market Size - Water Recycling Market: Beverage Industry

The industrial water & wastewater treatment market in North America was valued at $38.25 billion in 2017 and the market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 1.8% between 2015 and 2025. Various industries including the food & beverage industry, pharmaceuticals, and specialty chemicals have taken a number of initiatives leading to the increase in demand in the industrial water & wastewater treatment market. Although the data for the size of the water recycling market in the US for the beverage industry specifically is not available publicly, below mentioned are the useful findings obtained through the research.

WATER RECYCLING MARKET — BEVERAGE INDUSTRY: HELPFUL FINDINGS

  • According to the Freedonia report, "demand for water treatment equipment in the US is expected to rise 5.2 percent annually to $15.0 billion in 2019."
  • The rise in the demand for water treatment equipment in the US will be "supported by sustained efforts to decrease water consumption through the treatment and reuse of wastewater and by rising water treatment standards in industrial markets such as manufacturing, resource extraction, and power generation."
  • The data for water treatment equipment demand for the food and beverage industry is behind paywalls.

THE NORTH AMERICA AND THE US MARKET:

  • In 2017, the "industrial application of the North America water & wastewater treatment market was valued at $38.25 billion."
  • The market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 1.8% between 2015 and 2025.
  • The industrial water & wastewater treatment market is driven by a number of initiatives undertaken by various industries, including the food & beverage industry, pharmaceuticals, and specialty chemicals.
  • The industrial sector accounts for more than 20% of total water usage in the North America region and "continuous optimization in industrial operations is expected to generate potential demand for treated and reused water."
  • The North America market for water & wastewater treatment market has been segmented into two segments: U.S. and Canada.

GLOBAL MARKET:

  • The global water recycle and reuse market has been divided into various segments based on the use of technology, application, and regional segments.
  • The three segments based on technology are Physical Treatment Technology, Chemical Treatment Technology, and Biological Treatment Technology.
  • Market segments of the global water recycle and reuse market based on applications are Agrochemical, Industrial , and others.
  • Regional segments of the global water recycle and reuse market are North America (The U.S.), Europe (UK, France, Germany), Asia Pacific (China, Japan, India), Latin America (Brazil, Middle East, and Africa).
  • The water recycling and use for the beverage industry comes under the industrial application segment of the total water recycling market as stated above.
  • However, the size of the water recycling market in the US for the beverage industry specifically is behind paywalls and can only be accessed upon purchase of the report ($4,199).
  • In 2011, the global Food and Beverage water and wastewater market was $2.86 billion and by 2020, the market was estimated to reach $4.65 billion.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

In order to find the size of the water recycling market in the US for the beverage industry specifically, our research team initially searched for market research reports such as Zion Market Research, Hexa Research, Global News Wire, and others. Most of the reports we found, provided information on the global market for the water recycling and reuse market or global market for wastewater treatment. Although these reports contain the required information on the size of the water recycling market in the US for the beverage industry, the data was behind paywalls. While looking at the report, we were able to learn that the global market is segmented based on the application, region, and technologies used in the water treatment. But none of the reports provided US-specific data.

In the absence of any US-specific data for the size of the water recycling market for the beverage industry, we decided to look for any reports specific to the North America region hoping that they might contain US-specific data. While looking at various market research reports, industry reports, media articles, and others such as Bluefield Research, Freedonia Group, Technoscienze, and others. Through this research, we were able to find the information on the industrial water & wastewater treatment market in North America. But again no specific data could be found for the size of the water recycling market in the US for the beverage industry.

Lastly, we turned towards data triangulation based on global or North America data to get the desired data for the size of the water recycling market in the US for the beverage industry specifically. The idea was to look for any percentage share that the US market accounts for in the total global or North American water recycling market. And, also, the percentage share of the beverage industry application in the total industrial water & wastewater treatment market. While looking through the above-mentioned sources including market research reports, media articles, and others, we were not able to find any specific US-specific data. However, we were able to learn that the North American market is divided into two markets: US and Canada.

A search for the old sources beyond two years also, could not reveal much information. Based on the above-mentioned strategies, we have established that the desired data for the size of the water recycling market in the US for the beverage industry specifically is not available publicly. The data is available in the paid market research reports. However, we were able to find the market size of the industrial application of the North America water & wastewater treatment market.

Based on all the publicly available sources, we have provided useful information as helpful findings in this research.
Sources
Sources

From Part 02
From Part 03
Quotes
  • " Fiji's sustainable ancient artesian aquifer with the world and working to improve the lives and environment of its people, FIJI Water has embodied what it means to be Earth's Finest Water® since 1996."
  • "The FIJI Water Foundation is a charitable trust funded and supported by the owners, employees, and corporate affiliates of FIJI Water, with a focus on sustainability and improving the lives of native Fijians since 2007."
Quotes
  • "[David] Gilmour put Fiji Water up for sale in 2004, it was the fourth most popular imported bottled water in the United States. He found eager buyers in the Resnicks, who made their fortune with the flower delivery service Teleflora and the collectibles company Franklin Mint. The Beverly Hills-based couple are also agribusiness billionaires whose holdings include enough almond, pistachio, and pomegranate acreage to make them the biggest growers of those crops in the entire Western Hemisphere; a 2004 report by the Environmental Working Group calculated that in 2002 alone, their agricultural water subsidies totaled more than $1.5 million. They own a pesticide company, Suterra, and Lynda Resnick almost single-handedly created the pomegranate fad via their Pom Wonderful brand."
  • "Fiji Water wasn’t the Resnicks’ first foray into the water industry: Years ago, they gained control of one of the largest underground water reservoirs in the nation, the Kern Water Bank on the edge of California’s Central Valley. This vast holding system—built with public funds in 1999 to help buffer the effects of droughts—stores water from California’s aqueducts and the Kern River; it’s estimated to be worth more than $180 million on the open market and has allowed the Resnicks to double their acreage of fruits and nuts since 1994, according to the Los Angeles Times. "
  • "The closely held company won’t disclose basic data about its business (such as total charity expenditures), and it’s gone to some length to shelter assets in secretive tax havens: The Fijian operation, according to court documents filed last year, is owned by an entity in Luxembourg, while its American trademarks are registered to an address in the Cayman Islands."
  • "The charitable works Fiji Water brags about most often, however, are its efforts in Fiji itself—from preserving rainforests to helping fund water and sanitation projects to underwriting kindergartens. This January, after catastrophic floods swept the main island of Viti Levu, the company also donated $500,000 to the military regime for flood relief, and gave another $450,000 to various projects last summer."
Quotes
  • "While Fiji Water has been around as a brand for two decades and reports that it outsells all other premium bottled-water brands combined in the U.S., it stands to benefit from a sharpened identity in a beverage segment that is only continuing to grow, on its way to eclipsing the rapidly declining carbonated soft-drink category as the largest in the global beverage business. Roll Global has controlled the brand since 2004."
  • "Fiji Water is the No. 1 premium bottled-water brand in the U.S. but has never felt the need to advertise on TV—until now. The brand debuted a $30-million marketing campaign on Monday, under the banner "Untouched," with a series of 15-second spots (and the hashtag #EarthsFinest) designed to reinforce the brand's authenticity by promoting the pristine origins of its pure water source in its namesake homeland."
Quotes
  • "The owners of Fiji Water’s parent company, Stewart and Lynda Resnick, announced in September 2019 an unprecedented $750 million pledge to world-renowned science and engineering institute Caltech to fight climate change. The commitment is the largest ever for environmental sustainability research and the second-largest to a U.S. academic institution in history. A portion of the research will focus on decomposable plastics, along with tackling issues of water, energy, food and waste in a world confronting rapid climate change. Fiji Water will further reach its sustainability goals through new packaging innovations and plastic reduction."
  • "Fiji Water is a subsidiary of The Wonderful Co., which has a broad commitment to sustainability, including $400 million invested in water-efficient irrigation systems, ecofriendly pest control and creative ways to reduce energy use."
Quotes
  • "Premium imported bottled water brand FIJI Water has announced a multifaceted initiative to transform its use of plastic while promoting a circular economy. The plan is highlighted by an aggressive timetable to make all plastic bottles from 100% recycled plastic PET by 2025, with 20% rPET in bottles next year. "
  • "The owners of FIJI Water’s parent company, Stewart and Lynda Resnick, announced in September 2019 a $750 million pledge to science and engineering institute Caltech to fight climate change. According to the company, the commitment is the largest ever for environmental sustainability research and the second-largest to a U.S. academic institution in history. A portion of the research will focus on decomposable plastics, along with tackling issues of water, energy, food, and waste. "
Quotes
  • "With their gift, Caltech plans to construct a new 75,000-square-foot building, which they will call the Resnick Sustainability Resource Center, according to the university. There university researchers will study solar science, climate science, energy, biofuels, decomposable plastics, water and environmental resources, as well as ecology and biosphere engineering."
Quotes
  • "Among the Resnicks’ businesses, Fiji Water stands out for its environmental unsustainability. The couple acquired Fiji Water in 2004 for their privately held company, which was then known as Roll International and has since been rebranded as Wonderful Co."
  • "Transporting water in bottles to places that already have access to abundant water — such as most of the U.S. — is wasteful on a mindboggling scale."
  • "The company says it’s “using advanced strategies like micro irrigation” and has invested “over $400 million to innovate and implement new, more efficient ways to irrigate our orchards.”"
Quotes
  • "Wonderful Pistachios & Almonds is the world’s largest vertically integrated pistachio and almond grower and processor. Grown in California’s Central Valley, our high-quality nuts can be found in the produce department of grocery stores across America."
  • "Headquartered in Los Angeles, The Wonderful Company is a privately held $4 billion global company.... The company’s 8,500 employees worldwide are dedicated to bringing consumers everywhere the freshest, most wholesome pistachios, almonds, citrus and pomegranates; bottling the finest water and wines; and creating colorful bouquets that are sure to touch the heart. This commitment is reflected in the company’s market share: Wonderful Pistachios is America’s No. 1 tree nut brand and one of the top-selling salty snacks; Wonderful Halos is the No. 1 mandarin orange in America; POM Wonderful is the No. 1 100% pomegranate brand in America; FIJI Water is America's No. 1 premium bottled water brand; Teleflora is the No. 1 floral delivery service through local florists; and JUSTIN Wine has the No. 1 Cabernet Sauvignon in California. A 2016 Nielsen study evaluating the familiarity, quality, and momentum of more than 2,500 leading brands revealed that Wonderful Company products dominated the top 10 lists of consumers across all generations, more than any other consumer goods company. The company has a long-standing commitment to corporate social responsibility, including nearly $200 million invested in environmental technologies and sustainability research, $45 million in charitable giving and education initiatives every year, $80 million toward the construction of a new charter school campus in California’s Central Valley, and innovative health and wellness programs, including two new, free primary care clinics for employees and their dependents. "
Quotes
  • "Nearly half of American households purchase products sold by the billionaire-backed holding company Roll Global , according to Roll, but most consumers probably have no idea. They haven't realized that such brands like Pom Wonderful, Fiji Water and Wonderful Halos were all related. The company is hoping to change that. On Monday it announced it was aligning all 10 brands under a new corporate name: The Wonderful Company. "
Quotes
  • "Each year we invest more than $50 million in far-reaching community development, education, and health and wellness programs across California's Central Valley and beyond, all with the goal of enriching and enhancing the lives of our employees, their families and their communities."