Water Purification

Part
01
of three
Part
01

Water Purification Market Size

The water purification market consists of water purifiers which are used in the purification of water for drinking. Water purification can apply to any type of water filtration system including active carbon filters, UV Ultraviolet filtration systems, carbon-filtered water pitchers, faucet-installed carbon filters, water distillers, reverse osmosis systems, chemically-treated and municipal chlorinating water processes. The global water purification market is estimated to be about $62.70 billion.

GLOBAL WATER PURIFICATION MARKET SIZE

  • According to a report published on Global NewsWire, in 2016, the global water purifier market was $53.36 billion. This revenue is projected to increase to $110.02 billion by 2025 at a CAGR of 8.40% during the forecast period from 2016 to 2025.
  • Therefore, to get the current market we made the following calculations;
2016 market size = $53.36 billion
2017 market size= ($53.36 billion x 8.4%)+53.36billion=$57.84billion
2018 market size=($57.84billion x8.4%) +$57.84billion=$62.70billion
2019 market size=($62.70billion x8.4%)+$62.70 billion=$67.97billion

  • Over the past years, water purifying treatments have grown steadily due to increased product availability and selection. Also, population growth and the increase in water pollution are some factors that have contributed to the growth of this market.

WATER PURIFIERS

  • The water purification market is segmented into various technologies which include Reverse Osmosis Purifiers, Ultraviolet Purifiers, Gravity Based and Sediment Filters.
  • Reverse osmosis is a type of water purification technology that involves the use of a semipermeable membrane to remove molecules, ions, and large particles from drinking water. This market segment is projected to grow with a CAGR of 9.9% from 2016 to 2025.
  • This filtration process can remove about 90% to 99% of contaminants in drinking water and is also one of the technologies that is growing fast.
  • Ultraviolet water purification is a method that uses ultraviolet radiation to make water suitable for drinking. This technique uses high-energy light which can make disease-causing agents and bacteria within the water inactivate.
  • The Ultraviolet market segment is projected to grow at a CAGR of about 9.5% from 2016 to 2025. Its cost-effectiveness is one of the main contributing factors to its growth.
  • Gravity-based water purifiers is a technique that involves the use of activated carbon or ultrafiltration (UF). Activated carbon comprises carbon granules that are small and are that absorb impurities which are present in water while ultrafiltration contains several hollow fibers of the membrane upon which the impurities stick when water is made to pass through the hollow fibers.
  • Gravity-Based Water Purifiers market is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 9.9% by 2025, in terms of value due to its large scale usage in the corporation and municipality water supply.
  • Sediment Filtration is another effective technique that is used to reduce turbidity in water which is as a result of the presence of suspended solids like salt and sand. The untreated water is made to pass through a filter medium which then traps suspended solids.
  • Sediment Filters market segment is also expected to grow at an annual growth rate of about 9.6% in terms of value during the forecast period due to its usage in water treatment.

YOUR RESEARCH TEAM APPLIED THE FOLLOWING METHODOLOGY

To provide the global water purification market size, we first search began by searching for global market reports that addressed this market. We leveraged on reports published on Market Research and Reports, Global News Wire, Business Wire, and several others. However, none of these reports described the water purification market but the water purifier market. But, after thorough analysis, we found out that the market report published on Global News Wire addressed the question as the report defines the water purifier market by water purification technologies/systems. Hence, we believe the information provided addresses the question.




Part
02
of three
Part
02

Developing World Water Purification Systems

Some of the water purification systems/tools currently used in the developing world include Solar Water Disinfection (SODIS), Biosand Filters, Ceramic Candle Filter, UV-tubes, Lifestraw, Solar Ball, and colloidal silver filters.

#1: Solar Water Disinfection (SODIS)

  • SODIS can effectively purify polluted water only when the PET bottles are exposed to the sun for a minimum of 6 hours in the bright sky where UV-A radiation can kill thee pathogens. Thus, the process relies on the local climate.

Advantages

  • Simple water treatment method to use

Disadvantages

#2: Biosand Filters

  • The biosand filter (BSF) refers to an innovation based on slow sand water filters, specifically designed for household use. Developed in the 1990s by Dr. David Manz, BSF is composed of plastic or concrete container filled with selected sand and gravel.

Advantages

  • Easy to operate and maintain

Disadvantages

#3: Ceramic Candle Filter

Advantages

  • The process removes pathogens, suspended solids, and turbidity

Disadvantages

  • In a local production, it is difficult to control the quality

#4: UV-tubes

  • The UV tube looks similar to the commercial fluorescent bulb, but its exterior coating is made of fused quartz instead of the usual phosphor coating in bulbs. In the purification system, the bulb is suspended inside a tube placed within a covered channel; as water flows from one end to the outlet, UV light is emitted from the bulb, which then inactivates microorganisms in water.

Advantages

  • Highly effective in inactivating several pathogens including Guardia, E. Coli, and Cryptosporidium

Disadvantages

#5: Lifestraw

This tool refers to a cigar-shaped tube that is packed with innovative purifiers. Introduced in 1994, the straw is designed to inactivate potential pathogens such as typhoid, dysentery, diarrhea, and cholera, making water secure to drink.

Advantages

Disadvantages

  • The purification tool requires that individuals drink water directly from the source; thus, cannot be used to transport potable water.

#6: Solar Ball

Invented by Monash University graduate, Jonathan Liow, the Solar Ball was designed to purify water using solar power. When placed in the sun, the ball separates contaminants and dirt using evaporation, which results in condensation that can be used for drinking.

Advantages

  • Removes turbidity

Disadvantages

  • One super ball produces 3 liters of water in a day which is only enough for one person.

Colloidal Silver Filters

The colloidal silver filters (CSF) is a water treatment tool that uses physical treatment approach. The filters are made of both clay candle, which constitutes ceramic materials and colloidal silver used to enhance the process of inactivating bacteria.

Advantages

  • A colloidal silver filter is portable

Disadvantages

  • The purification process has a relatively low flow rate

RESEARCH strategy

In order to identify the common types of water purification systems used in developing countries, we searched through the internet for conducted research and sustainable reports that outline the common types of purification systems/tools. We were able to identify a 2018 report published by Journal of Public Health and Emergency, which listed the commonly used systems including chlorination, solar disinfection ceramic filters, and biosand filtration. We also found a source published by the Sustainable Sanitation and Water Management Toolbox outlining the common water purification systems used in developing countries. We used these sources to outline seven water purification systems including Solar Water Disinfection (SODIS), Biosand Filters, Ceramic Candle Filter, UV-tubes, Lifestraw, Solar Ball, and colloidal silver filters.

Part
03
of three
Part
03

Water-Borne Illness Costs

There was no information available on the public domain with regard to the impact of water-borne illness in the developing world each year. Below is the information that was available on the topic.

FINDINGS

  • According to the World Water Council, the annual estimated cost of diseases and productivity losses related to unclean water in Sub-Saharan Africa is 5% of the GDP or $28.4 billion per year.
  • The United Nations reports that 50% of hospital beds in Third World countries are taken up by parents with water-related diseases.
  • According to UNICEF, 90% of deaths due to diarrhea in developing countries is the result of poor water and sanitation conditions and occur in children younger than 5 years old. One American dollar invested in sanitation can save between US$3-US$34 in medical costs, lost productivity, and save time.
  • According to a study on water-borne diseases, the population in South Asia that earns below the poverty level is carrying the cost of water-borne diseases and pays US$0.60-US$1.20 per day. This group is followed by those in the low and average income level group with a direct cost of US$ 2.30 per day. The indirect cost of illness is around US$ 2.30-US$4.70 per day.
  • DefeatDD has broken-down the average household cost of treating one episode of diarrhea in Malawi, a developing country, into the following expenses: $0.77 on direct medical expenses; $2.04 on transportation, meals, and lodging; $6.36 on lost income due to hospital visit; $7.31 on direct medical expenses; and $0.26 on direct medical expenses after visit.
  • According to an article on the "Cost of Caregivers for Treating Hospitalized Diarrhea Patients in Bangladesh", the average overall cost of caregivers in Bangladesh was US$ 28.58; out-of-pocket payments came down to US$ 3.29; the expenses for food, lodging, and utility bills came down to US$ 1.63; transportation costs amounted to US$ 1.57; and out-patient care was approximately US$12.42 in a year.
  • According to the WHO, the most common water-borne illness in developing countries is Diarrhea which kills around 2.2 million people globally each year of which the majority are children. In Southeast Asia and Africa, Diarrhea is the cause of 8.5% and 7.7% of all deaths respectively.

OTHER INFORMATION

  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the annual hospitalization and treat-and-release emergency department visit costs associated with the waterborne disease amounts to $3.8 billion annually for the US.
  • According to Water, globally women and girls spend 200 million hours every day collecting water; one million people die each year from water, sanitation and hygiene-related diseases; and $260 billion is lost globally each year as a result of the absence of basic water and sanitation.

    Research Strategy

    To determine the economic impact of water-borne illnesses/diseases in the developing world, we first searched through various social research publications, particularly those related water-borne/water-related diseases in developing countries and their economic burden. For this purpose, we searched through academic publications such as those found on Researchgate, NCBI, MDPI. Most of the available information provided insight into the cost of implementing water and sanitation infrastructure in developing countries and global data on the loss resulting from a lack of basic sanitation and hygiene. However, there was no information on developing countries or statistics defining the total annual cost of water-borne illnesses. We did find an academic article and an article from the World Water Council which shared insights on the total annual cost/economic impact of water-borne illnesses but their findings were limited to South Asian developing countries, Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa. Hence, the findings were not sufficient to completely respond to the request.

    As global health organizations such as WHO, UNICEF, UN Children fund, CARE International are working actively on global health issues, we tried to locate relevant information through searching the official websites of these organizations. By reviewing their websites, we were able to identify a source (CDC) providing information on the magnitude of the cost of water-borne disease in the US and other information on the impact of Diarrhea. However, the information found was not directly related to developing countries.

    Additionally, we attempted to triangulate the information. Based on the WHO statement that diarrhea is the most common form of water-related diseases in developing countries, we further sought statistics on diarrhea incidents in developing countries in health-related research reports and credible medical news (such as DefeatDD, SSWM, Medical News Today). Our intention was to use this information as a proxy for all developing countries. We found that there were individual reports and annual calculations of the economic impact of water-borne illnesses on developing countries like Bangladesh, India, and Malawi, but they provided insufficient information to triangulate a figure for all developing countries.

Sources
Sources