Urology

Part
01
of two
Part
01

Demographics - People Seeking Urology Treatment: United States

After thorough research, we were unable to determine the demographics of people in the United States that are seeking urology treatment. However, we were able to gather some helpful insights for the client.

HELPFUL FINDINGS :

PEOPLE SEEKING UROLOGY TREATMENT IN THE UNITED STATES:

  • The average age at the time of bladder cancer diagnosis is 73 years.
  • The same study also reported that incidence rates among women observed the largest year-over-year increase at 3% per year, followed by African-Americans at 2.9%.
  • The American Urological Association reported an increase in the number of females and patients older than 64 years undergoing definitive treatment for kidney stones with time by identifying all kidney stone treatments done between July 1, 1991, and December 31, 2010.

NATIONAL AMBULATORY MEDICAL CARE SURVEY: FACTSHEET

  • According to the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, there were approximately 19 million visits to non-federally employed, office-based urologists in the United States in the year 2010.
  • About 33% of the patients seeking Urology treatment were in the age group of 45-64 years, followed by 27% who were about 75+ years old.
  • Annual visit rates with 30 visits, was the highest among patients with age above 75+ years.

RESEARCH STRATEGY:

We commenced our research by looking for academic research papers as they were most likely to contain demographic data. We reviewed Research Gate, Academia, Wharton and others. Unfortunately, the majority of the above sources discussed topics including an increase in hospitalization of urinary tract infections and the associated costs in the United States from the year 1998–2011 which were not pertinent to the request.

Our second strategy was to look for information on urology association websites such as the American Urological Association and Urology Care Foundation. We were hoping to get any relevant reports or articles regarding demographics as these sites are highly regarded in the field of urology. Unfortunately, no information was available regarding the demographics of people in the United States that are seeking urology treatment. Instead, we encountered non-relevant information about patients who underwent treatment for kidney stones in 2014 and similar.

As none of our above strategies yielded any useful result, we finally tried to triangulate the information by looking for demographics of people seeking treatment for kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra as it deals with diseases of the male and female urinary tract (kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra). Following the same approach, we looked for journals and health publications related to urology including SAGE, ASN, The Lens, UrologyHealth, and Healthline. Through this strategy, we were able to gather insights on the rising cases of kidney stones in the United States and cases of bladder cancer, but there was no information available on the demographics of people seeking any of the above treatments including urology. Hence, none of the searches yielded any positive results.

Part
02
of two
Part
02

Case Studies - Successful Marketing Campaigns for Urology

Case studies of the successful marketing campaign by Urology Associates, Concord Hospital, and Perlow Urology have been detailed in this research. Links to the creative advertising done in each campaign is available in this Google Doc.

CASE STUDIES: SUCCESSFUL MARKETING CAMPAIGNS FOR UROLOGY

1. UROLOGY ASSOCIATES

WHAT THEY DID

  • Urology Associates' marketing campaigns centered around improving its online presence, engaging prospective patients, and building brand reputation through positive client reviews.
  • The company partnered with a marketing agency, Legato Health Marketing, to audit its website, review functionality, examine how prospects perceived the brand online, and understand the expectations required of its online prospects.
  • After the examination by Legatho Health Marketing, Urology Associates redesigned its website, which led to a responsive custom web development that involved an SEO strategy implementation to improve online discovery and readability for prospects, as well as site optimization for search engines.
  • Next, Urology Associates conducted keywords research to identify keywords prospective patients used to find the services it provided. This effort led the company to create Google Ads campaigns with keywords such as "men's fertility," "erectile dysfunction," "low testosterone," and others.
  • During the campaign, Urology Associates also created a page on Facebook to engage patients and prospective ones by sharing the latest urology health information, related clinic news, and relevant patient education.
  • Furthermore, to encourage reviews and enhance its brand reputation, Urology Associates created personalized after-care cards for patients, which made patients share the experiences they received from Urology Associates on review portals such as Vitals, RateMD, Healthgrades, and others.

WHY IT WAS SUCCESSFUL

  • Urology Associates increased its website traffic by 66% in just six months of the marketing campaign.
  • The company achieved Google Ads click-through-rates above the industry average of 1.71% for all of its campaigns, including men's fertility (5.65%); kidney stones (5.05%), and others.
  • Urology Associates' patient form submissions for appointment bookings increased by 15% as a result of this marketing campaign.
  • We included snapshots of the creative advertising done in this attached Google Doc.

2. CONCORD HOSPITAL

WHAT THEY DID

  • The Urologic Care of Concord Hospital ranked in the top 7% of the US patient satisfaction survey. This achievement prompted the management of the hospital to embark on a marketing campaign to spread the word of its high-value service and use the same to reach new patients in Concord, as well as those in the surrounding areas.
  • Thus, Concord Hospital's Urologic Care unit's marketing campaign was to increase its service line volume and visibility beyond its primary area of service. The organization worked with Geonetric's 5-step pay-per-click advertising campaign process: "conceive, develop, implement, analyze, and test."
  • In the conceive and develop stages, the company examined its core services, how patients researched for these services online, and the demographics of such patients. Then, they developed text, display, and dynamic ads for Google Ads and Bing Ads, which included dynamic insertion of keywords to personalize the ads and make it more relevant to prospective patients.
  • In the implementation and analyzing stages, the company also launched display ad campaigns on social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter to reach or re-engage prospects that previously interacted with its campaigns. The company also analyzed campaigns across all platforms and ended those that failed to produce the desired results.

WHY IT WAS SUCCESSFUL

  • This marketing campaign by the Urologic Care of Concord Hospital drove over 9,570 new website visitors and increased the awareness of this practice.
  • In three months of the campaign, the company achieved 17 appointment requests, which generated new revenue for the Urologic Care of Concord Hospital.
  • We included snapshots of the creative advertising done in this attached Google Doc.

PERLOW UROLOGY

WHAT THEY DID

  • Perlow Urology's wanted to increase the amount of its monthly and annual vasectomy procedures, leading the company to partner with Intreply Healthcare Marketing develop a digital advertising campaign.
  • The company leveraged Intrepy Healthcare Marketing's PatientConvert Program to geotarget digital ads at specific male age ranges, which created ads along accompanying landing pages that converted prospects into new vasectomy patients.
  • Perlow Urology's campaign involved a unique value proposition promoting a concept the company called "Saturday Vasectomy Clinic" that gave potential patients the idea that they could book to do a procedure on Saturday and get back to work on Monday without having to waste work time.
  • Furthermore, during the campaign, Perlow Urology developed physician liaison marketing program that focused on increasing its vasectomy procedures through referrals. This effort involved the creation of unique business cards for over 40 physician practices that enabled the referring of general urology and vasectomy patients to Perlow Urology.

WHY IT WAS SUCCESSFUL

  • Perlow Urology's unique value proposition resulted in a massive growth in new procedures that also led them to become a significant provider of vasectomy practice in greater Atlanta.
  • Perlow Urology achieved a 752% return on investment for this campaign. Also, it witnessed a 505% growth in monthly vasectomy leads, as well as an 840% rise in new vasectomy and general urology appointments.
  • We included snapshots of the creative advertising done in this attached Google Doc.

RESEARCH STRATEGY:

We started by investigating credible media and marketing portals, including Ad Week, Forbes, Ad Age, Business Insider, and others for reports revealing successful marketing campaigns for urology practices. This investigation yielded reports highlighting how urology practices could use marketing to attract more appointments, but there was no case of a practice that implemented the recommendations discussed.

Therefore, we switched strategies to research the websites and blogs of agencies dedicated to medical marketing with the hope to locate reports of case studies featuring successful marketing campaigns for marketing urology. This time, we discovered case study reports by Geonetric, Legato Health Marketing, Intrepy, which provided details revealing how and why their campaigns were successful, respectively. However, as per investigation, these campaigns no longer live, as of the time of this research, meaning that links to the creative advertising done in each case were currently not available in the public domain. However, we took snapshots of the creative advertising done in each case study and provided the same in this attached Google Doc.


Sources
Sources