UK Q1-2019 Education Update

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UK Q1-2019 Education Update

The key developments in the UK's education system during the first quarter of 2019 involve the following: the new UK international student strategy proposal, the proposed scrapping of the GCSE, UK's DFID's partnerships to improve education systems, "purpose-built student accommodation (PBSA)" investments, and England's educational crisis due to shortage of teaching staff.

UK Q1-2019 Education Update

1. January 2019: New UK International Student Strategy Proposal

During the Education World Forum in London, the UK's education minister, Damian Hinds, announced that he is trying to get an inter-government alignment on the new international education approach. Mr. Hinds and Liam Fox, the international trade minister, laid out their goal of putting the international education strategy in the post-Brexit plans of the UK. The education minister also emphasized the significance of the education sector as a "big part of our diplomacy." The strategy being proposed seem to center around the inbound international students, but Mr. Hinds also clarified that other branches of education such as edtech will also fit in the proposed plans.
This was considered as a key development as it involves an announcement from the UK government's education minister. This proposed changes will also impact many international students, especially in the light of one of the major priorities in the UK right now, the post-Brexit plans.

2. February 2019: GCSE Scrapping

Robert Halfon, the UK's Education Select Committee chairman, is proposing the elimination of the GCSE system. He also mentioned that the education system in the country needs to be completely restructured. Mr. Halfon also stated his belief that students should be required to improve their skills alongside school subject proficiency. This is to prepare them for a highly digital and automated future.
This was considered as a key development since this will impact the whole country's educational system in terms of secondary examination requirements.

3. January 2019: UK's DFID's Collaboration with the World Bank and the Gates Foundation to improve education

The UK's Department of International Development mentioned that they are working with the World Bank and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to start building tools that can track the quality of education systems around the world, including the UK's own system. This can then empower policymakers to immediately decide if a policy needs to be put in place to make sure that students are learning. This work will also enable the advancement of the priorities of the Human Capital Project, a global initiative to invest more in people for economic advancement.
This was considered as a key development due to the educational investment involved. Furthermore, the impact to the educational system in the UK and in the world is immense.

4. February 2019: "Purpose-Built Student Accommodation (PBSA)" Investment

Blockchain companies have zeroed-in on "purpose-built student accommodation (PBSA) properties" as they consider this type of real estate to be the best option to "tokenize". This type of property is experiencing a solid market performance that can lead to stronger growth. These accommodations continue to keep its status as an enticing asset group in the UK.
This was considered as a key development as it involves major transactions in the private sector that revolve around student housing.

5. February 2019: England's Teachers' Shortage

The education system in England is seen to be nearing the crisis level. One of the major factors to this crisis is the shortage of teachers. Schools in the country are having difficulty in enticing and keeping teaching personnel. This can be explained by the results of a survey among state school staff. In the survey, respondents mentioned that majority of their work has no meaning. They claimed that the profession is now all about measuring attributes instead of focusing on organic learning.
This was considered as a key development as it provokes key debates or conversations in the mainstream media on the factors and the solutions that contribute to the country's education crisis.

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