Tracking Tech in Hospital ORs

Part
01
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Part
01

Tracking Technology in Hospital ORs - Matrix IT (Tractus)

There is no evidence that the pricing model for Tractus by Matrix IT is available in the public domain. A search of leading hospitals that may have an alliance, Matrix IT news and press release and medical news sites for places where the system may be installed. In addition, any sales or service contracts on registered medical device websites, and a search of UDI leaders in the market ws searched, however, the TRACTUS sterile scanner is the world’s first and is the only patented scanning device in the segment. Finally, there is no mention in Government contracts of service. This information can also be found in the attached spreadsheet.

Matrix IT does not make the full price of the Tractus complete system public. However, it does list an integral component of its package, the TRACTUS Barcode Validation and Scanner system at $15,000. The full system, as tested in two simulations in 2016, includes the following components:

- Tractus Sterile Field Scanner
- Tractus Drape
- Tractus Handheld Scanner
- Tractus Laptop Computer loaded with Tractus Software

How much the additional components cost is unclear.

It is also unclear how much the technology has evolved since its testing, which took place at Wickenburg Hospital and Wisconsin Health Center in 2016, however, the company hailed the test as a significant success.
Part
02
of twelve
Part
02

Tracking Technology in Hospital ORs - Genesis Automation

While there is no pre-existing information to fully answer your question, we've used the available data to pull together key findings: Genesis Automation Healthcare, founded in 2010, provides a SaaS solution for "tracking medical supplies and devices from hospital entry point through every phase of distribution." They began expanding into the US market in 2016, closing their first deals in 2017. Genesis has very deliberately withheld information about its pricing models or the size of its deals, most likely to make it easier to adjust pricing as they grow their client base. We are therefore unable to provide the information requested on the project spreadsheet.
Below you'll find an outline of our research methodology to better understand why information you've requested is publicly unavailable, as well as a deep dive into our findings.

METHODOLOGY

We began with Genesis Automation Healthcare's homepage in the hopes that they had published their pricing models. This was not the case, however; the site offers several articles establishing Genesis's value to providers in the areas of point of care traceability, and improving patient costs and outcomes, but none of these mention a price point. Instead, the site encourages potential clients to book a demo to find out more. Genesis's LinkedIn page, though giving a useful summary of the company's product (see below), likewise yielded no clues as to their pricing model. Genesis is privately owned, and so does not produce a public annual report, and repositories of corporate data such as DataFox do not have sufficient information to estimate its annual revenue.
We next searched for press releases about Genesis's deals, using BusinessWire as our primary, but not only, source. We found three announced deals, all in 2017: The first is with Vizient, Inc., under which "Genesis Automation will offer enhanced savings to Vizient members on [its] integrated supply chain management technology." The second is a deal with the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, and the third is a deal with Driscoll Children's Hospital. None of these press releases gave any details about pricing, which is unfortunate since we might have used the pricing and the details of the clients in question (e.g., Driscoll's staff or bed count) to triangulate an answer.
Finally, we conducted a broad-based search for any more information about Genesis Automation Healthcare, including searching UK-based news sources. This did not yield any additional data by which we might be able to triangulate an answer.

MOTIVATIONS FOR WITHOLDING PRICING

We hypothesize that Genesis deliberately withholds its pricing model to give it more room for negotiation and adjusting their pricing model as they go. As Lincoln Murphy points out, establishing the right price point for a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) product is more art than science: "All we can do is get it AS RIGHT AS POSSIBLE out of the gate and understand that pricing is not a 'set it and forget it' function, but just as your overall Marketing Strategy is ever-evolving and changing with market forces, market feedback, etc." (emphasis original).
So, for example, suppose Genesis published a pricing model that is too high for the market to bear; they would potentially drive away interested parties before they ever had a chance to get them to the negotiating table. Conversely, if they set prices too low and then tried to correct upwards, they might anger new potential clients who heard about the earlier pricing. To avoid these kinds of scenarios, Murphy advises leading with the product's value to the client, not with pricing, which is exactly what we see Genesis doing on their homepage. We also see the use of that pricing flexibility coming into play in their Vizient deal described above.

OTHER USEFUL INFORMATION ABOUT GENESIS

Genesis Automation Healthcare was founded in the UK in 2010 "to bring best practice processes and innovative technology solution that have been proven in other sectors to Healthcare providers, in order to enable them to improve the quality and efficiency of their patient care." It began expanding into the US market in 2016, hiring 20 new employees in the process (effectively doubling its staff), and closed its first US deals in 2017.
As described on their LinkedIn page, "Our solution does this by tracking medical supplies and devices from hospital entry point through every phase of distribution and use within the healthcare setting including the OR. By connecting vital healthcare data throughout the workflow process, we give providers accurate information in real-time for better decision making. Our integrated system captures virtually any kind of tracking code (barcode, 2D matrix, QR, etc.) including UDI, making it simple and easy to track supplies by batch, lot numbers, and expiration dates - improving recall management and patient safety."

CONCLUSION

Ultimately, if a privately-owned company does not wish to disclose its pricing models, that information is highly unlikely to leak out into the public sphere. This appears to be the case for Genesis Automation Healthcare, which likely is playing its cards close to its chest to give it more room to negotiate with its potential clients. Since their pricing model is not publicly available, we are unable to provide it in the project spreadsheet.

Part
03
of twelve
Part
03

Tracking Technology in Hospital ORs - Champion Healthcare Technologies

Champion Healthcare Technologies, which changed its name from Champion Medical Technologies in 2016, provides four tracking products: the software products UDITracker OR, which tracks tissue, UDITracker Interventional, which tracks implants and devices, Warranty Tracker, which tracks device warranties, as well as RFID storage units which work with the tracking software. Champion Healthcare Technologies does not publish their pricing on their website, and media articles suggest that much of their pricing is negotiated through contracts with healthcare provider groups that negotiate pricing for the group. While no pricing for private hospitals was found, Champion does have US government contracts for Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals under their old name, Champion Medical Technologies. No information about pricing models was found but based on the available contracts, pricing seems to be based on an initial software purchase, followed by annual subscription renewals. RFID storage units are sold per unit at a one-time cost, and as noted above, pricing appears to be negotiable. As such, the pricing negotiated by an entity as large as the VA hospital system is likely much lower than that available to a single hospital. Pricing from the VA hospital system contracts is shown below, and detailed information has been entered into the attached spreadsheet. When a contract has not yet been completed, the obligated amount has been given.

pricing

UDI Tracker system: $76, 800. It is unclear if this is the UDITracker OR or the UDITracker Interventional, and no other contracts were found that indicated which tracker is referenced when the contract is for a UDITracker system.
Warranty Tracker: $66,000.
UDITracker Interventional Software Annual Subscription: $17,900.
UDITracker OR Software Annual Subscription: $11,400. The contract refers to simply UDITracker, but as the Interventional software was explicitly called such, this contract is probably for the tissue tracker (OR) version.
RFID Freezer: $48,300.

cONCLUSION

While no information on pricing models was found, contracts with VA hospitals under their old name suggest that Champion Healthcare Technologies prices its software on an initial purchase and annual renewal basis, while RFID storage units are sold in the standard one-time cost model. Pricing appears to be negotiable, with Champion holding contracts with large private hospital groups as well as with the US government's VA hospital system. Information can be found in the attached spreadsheet.

Part
04
of twelve
Part
04

Tracking Technology in Hospital ORs - Surgical Directions

Surgical directions' pricing can range from about $250,000 for "management of central sterile processing" to $1.2 million for "Perioperative consulting services and supervision of surgical services" to $2.2 million for a comprehensive package of perioperative consulting services. The detailed information is provided in column F of the attached spreadsheet as requested.

We looked for the services that Surgical Directions provides and found that they do not publish any of their costs publicly. However, we found publicly published meeting minutes in which government councils or hospital boards formally approved contracts with Surgical Directions. Some of these are a bit dated. However, we decided to include them due to the scarcity of information on Surgical Directions pricing. Our main findings come from the 2016 contract, which has the most comprehensive pricing structure.

Key Findings

We found two case studies in which large vendors approved the proposal of Surgical Directions for product tracking technologies used in hospital operating rooms. Contract lengths are unknown, but the costs were estimated to be between $250K and $1.2 million.
1. In 2013, Meeting minutes from County of Santa Clara board increased the budget for a contract with Surgical Directions from $246,000 to $546,000 for "interim management of central sterile processing".
2. In 2016 meeting of the UNM Hospital Board of Trustees, the trustees granted the contract for the total of $2.25 million to Surgical Directions for the following services:

Phase I Perioperative Strategic assessment: $178,200
Phase II Perioperative Improvement engagement: $1,200,000
Phase III Supply chain Optimization: $875,000
This is the best example of the product pricing range of Surgical directions.

Conclusion

Surgical Directions' pricing model is not readily made available to the public and varies greatly depending on the vendor, need and contract negotiated. However, the price range as per customer contracts is provided in column F of the attached spreadsheet.
Part
05
of twelve
Part
05

Tracking Technology in Hospital ORs - Mobile Aspects

Mobile Aspects does not make their pricing model public. However, researching that Mobile Aspects pieces of equipment require installation at a medical facility, and considering how each of these equipment functions, we assumed they use a one-time, or outright sales, pricing model. In the case study of the Massachusetts General Hospital's installation of Mobile Aspect's RFID equipment, there was no pricing model mentioned, neither was there a price paid for the Mobile Aspects equipment. While we have assumed they may be using a one-time pricing model, the only logical way to find out would be to call their sales representatives (1-800-921-7343)

After extensively researching Mobile Aspects website, their customer case studies, press releases, news articles, and blog posts, yet found no pricing model used by Mobile Aspects. Hence, we extended our research to source how Mobile Aspects pieces of equipment functioned and how hospitals used them; from where we based our assumption that they employed a one-time, or outright sales pricing model.

Findings

The only definitive answer from our research is that some notable healthcare institutions are paying for Mobile Aspects pieces of equipment. However, the pricing model or price paid was not publicly available. Some of these institutions include:

The exact price or pricing model used by Mobile Aspects for each of the above institutions was not publicly stated. After taking a deep dive research, we made the assumption that Mobile Aspects uses a one-time pricing, or outright sales pricing model. As requested, find our research findings in this attached spreadsheet.

We recommend calling Mobile Aspects sales representative (1-800-921-7343) to find out their pricing model.

Conclusion

Mobile Aspects' pricing model is not publicly available neither is the price their customers paid for their equipment.

Part
06
of twelve
Part
06

Tracking Technology in Hospital ORs - Omnicell Optiflex

While there is no pre-existing information to fully answer your question, we've used the available data to pull together key findings. Solution costs can vary widely depending on the size of the facility and sanitation needs. Also, first-year licensing and use is typically higher than subsequent years due to initial installation and training. Below you'll find an outline of our research methodology to better understand why information you've requested is publicly unavailable, as well as a deep dive into our findings.

Methodology

Omnicell has a range of solutions and products on the market, accompanied by plenty of brochures, press releases, financial quarterly reports, and more. We searched the company website for any costs associated with the OptiFlex solution. We did not find any examples of RFPs or government contracts through the Department of Health and Human Services or the Department of Defense that included Omnicell. When that did not turn up any information, we broadened our search to examples of hospitals or case studies that used the solution for any information. While we found several sets of hospitals using OptiFlex, these case studies provided no data on the cost of the solution.

Helpful Findings

Our only piece of insight into potential costs was an article published by the Australian digital healthcare solutions provider, ScanCare. The author notes that any attempt to ask for a price off the bat is most likely going to be met with questions about the organization's needs and requirements. Examples noted in the article include the following questions:
Is tracking needed for...
... going through a washing process?
... assembly and packaging process?
... release of items through departments?
... use of sterile items when treating patients?
... return to sterilization units?
... batch tracking, laser etching, or scanning?
... integration with sterilizers and washers?
... prosthesis tracking?

These are questions additional to the obvious influence of scale, meaning how many operating rooms and facilities are being outfitted for the solution. The article breaks down seven main influencers on cost of inventory tracking technology:

1. What your organisation needs
2. What it is your organisation does
3. Software Licensing
4. Installation
5. Training
6. Hardware
7. Consumables

Other considerations could be an upfront fee versus a recurring fee for the product license. Is there a fee for support or is that optional? Cost of installation may raise the price for a first initial year. Training may be included or additional. We could not find any of this information for Ominicell's OptiFlex solution and suggest contacting them for more information.

Average Costs as Per Facility Size

The following costs are published as of 2016, and most likely in AUD currency. I've taken their estimates from their article and published the US cost rounded out and based on the exchange rate of December 2016.

Small facility (1-2 procedure rooms)
First year $15,000 - $30,000
Each year after $5,000 -$15,000

Medium facility (2-4 procedures rooms)
First year $30,000 - $45,000
Each year after - $15,000-$30,000 per year

Large facility (6-12 procedure rooms)
First year $45,000 - $90,000
Each year after - $30,000-$60,000 per year

Very large facility (12-20 procedure rooms)
First year $50,000 - $120,000
Each year after - $60,000-$120,000 per year

Rankings

Top performing companies tend to have the highest cost for products. In 2016, Omnicell was #4 of the top-10 companies in the US Medical Software industry by revenues. This may give you an idea of their prices as compared to other industry leaders.

Hospital Use

The OptiFlex solution utilizes Automated Physician Preference Cards (pg 4). Barcodes on each item let you add uses and charges to patients easily. The company offers a variety of dimensions and types of cabinets used in their solution to scale and customize the use.

OptiFlex has been noted for use in the following medical centers:
Athens Regional Medical Center (~350-bed facility)
Sid Peterson Memorial Hospital (115-bed facility)
St. Patrick Hospital and Health Sciences Center (213-bed facility)

Conclusion

You can find a summary of our findings in your spreadsheet column H. We were unable to find a pricing scale specific to the Omnicell OptiFlex solution, but estimates for a generic solution range from $15,000-120,000 per year depending on facility size and needs.
Part
07
of twelve
Part
07

Tracking Technology in Hospital ORs - SIS

SIS provides many types of healthcare software, but looking through all of their solutions revealed that the only surgical tracking product available is their Trax product. Trax is a tissue tracker, and is "fully integrated with the SIS perioperative solution." Trax is part of SIS's Surgery suite of products, and it is not clear if it can integrate with other companies' surgical software or be used as a standalone product. On the SIS site, Trax is listed in a section called "enhance your use of SIS Surgery with." This and other factors described below suggest it is an add-on available only with their SIS Surgery software system. Pricing was not available on the SIS site, and the only information found did not clearly state exactly what product was being sold. In one case, an SIS software solution for three years cost over $1.5 million, in another, two years of the non-specified SIS software cost $300,000. The pricing model appears to be based on an annual software license cost, annual add-on software costs, and an implementation fee. Details have been entered into the attached spreadsheet, and a brief overview is below.

PRICING

SIS does not give any pricing on its website, no pricing was found in articles about SIS contracts, and no government contracts were found for SIS Surgery or Trax. The only contract information found did not specify Trax, which could mean that Trax is not available as a standalone product.
One contract was for "licensing of the SIS system" at Zuckerburg San Francisco General Hospital in the amount of $1,514,397. It is not clear whether this is for just the Surgery line or the entire SIS line, but the only add-on is for the SIS Surgery system. The pricing breakdowns shown were:
3 years software license: $435,303.67/year
3 years Day of Surgery Dashboard license: $13,409.67/year
Day of Surgery Dashboard Implementation: 2 units at $3,000 each
On the SIS site, the Day of Surgery Dashboard is listed with TRAX in the "enhance your use of SIS Surgery with" section. This, combined with the Day of Surgery Dashboard as a separate line item in the contract, suggests that both the Day of Surgery Dashboard and TRAX are add-ons to the full Surgery solution, and thus Trax may not be available as a standalone offering.
The only other pricing information found was in a Notice of Exemption (from the competitive bid process) for Hawaii Health Systems Corporation (HHSC), a large hospital group. The 2017 purchase covered two years of "a means to organize and operationalize surgical and anesthesia services." This could mean both the SIS Surgery and SIS Anesthesia solutions were purchased. There is no other detail given, so it is not known if Trax was included. The total amount of the purchase was $300,000. This amount is significantly less than the amount of the software license for Zuckerburg San Francisco General Hospital. This may be partially due to different options selected by Hawaii Health Systems, and partially due to presumably better price negotiation available to the much larger Hawaii Health Systems Corporation.

PRICING MODEL

While no information on the pricing model is given on the SIS website or elsewhere, the contract for the San Francisco hospital suggests that the software is priced on an annual subscription basis, with add-ons available at additional yearly cost, and an additional set-up or implementation fee. The much lower cost for HHSC suggests that price is negotiable, with better pricing available to larger purchasers, such as hospital groups, than smaller purchases, such as an individual hospital like Zuckerburg San Francisco General Hospital.

conclusion

Pricing for Trax, the only surgical product tracking solution provided by SIS, is not readily available. This is probably due to the price being negotiable and varying greatly depending on the size of the purchaser, as suggested by the wide range between the only two price references found. The price model appears to be based on annual software licensing costs plus an implementation fee. Details can be found in the attached spreadsheet.
Part
08
of twelve
Part
08

Tracking Technology in Hospital ORs - Tecsys Healthcare

TECSYS offers eight software platform solutions for hospitals. Pricing estimates, as they relate to initial one-time license fees, were found for three of the TECSYS platforms, which have been included in the attached spreadsheet. All other pricing information is unavailable to the public, as quotes are required before pricing will be given. Pricing with all TECSYS platforms is dependent on the clients’ needs (e.g. how big is their company? How many software solutions do they need? How much training and set-up will be required?). Below is a list of the software offered by TECSYS.

TECSYS SOFTWARE PLATFORMS

See spreadsheet for pricing estimate.
See spreadsheet for pricing estimate.
See spreadsheet for pricing estimate.

SUMMARY

TECSYS offers eight platform solutions for hospitals, three of which have estimated licensing fees (one-time) of $50,000. Further, pricing is available only upon request for a quote and is dependent on the hospital's specific needs.

Part
09
of twelve
Part
09

Tracking Technology in Hospital ORs - TrackCore

TrackCore is primarily a software solution that enables hospitals to track tissues and implants in patients. They also offer RFID storage units and aid in inventory tracking. There is no indication on the website that the company offers any type of installation services. The pricing model appears to be dependent on the size of need, or the amount of tracking a hospital will need to do over a certain period. Purchases from this company appear to come in contracts; some through vendors, some appear to be direct. Contracts appear to be made for particular amounts of time to indefinite amounts of time. We found two case studies, contracts that TracCore holds with vendors and record of government contracts with a vendor that uses TrackCore. The expanded information located below, as well as in spreadsheet form.

We found two case studies where large hospitals, J.W. Ruby Memorial and West Virginia Healthcare, have purchased software and RFID storage units. Contract lengths are unknown, but the costs were estimated to be between $100K and $150K. In the case of J.W. Ruby Memorial Hospital, it was mentioned in an article about TrackCore adoption, that they paid under $150K to purchase. For West Virginia Healthcare the max contract value was reported to be $100K.

It was found that TrackCore has extended special pricing agreements and pre-negotiated terms with vendors of hospital services, Vizient and Premier.

In a government contract search, we found 30 contracts where The Department of Veteran Affairs are using TrackCore through the vendor LPiT. These contracts range in length from 2-weeks to an indefinite number. Pricing on the contracts ranged between $1,097 and $1.4 million, government contracts are paid in front loaded installments. Some contracts included hardware and software, some the software on its own.
We also searched the clients listed at the bottom of the TrackCore website but were unable to find any public information linking the medical groups to TrackCore.
SUMMARY
TrackCore pricing model is not readily made available to the public and varies greatly depending on the vendor, need and contract negotiated.

Part
10
of twelve
Part
10

Tracking Technology in Hospital ORs - BD Pyxis

While there is not enough preexisting information to fully answer the question, we were able to find a pricing model for one BD Pyxis product. If we assume that other modules are priced in the same manner, each system includes the unit, free installation, free shipping, console with monitor and 1-year service agreement and costs in the vicinity of $50,000. Below you'll find an outline of our research methodology to better understand why the information requested is publicly unavailable, as well as a deep dive into our findings.
METHODOLOGY
An extensive keyword search was conducted to locate files/sites made public; or press releases, RFPs, or government contracts through the Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Defense or the Department of Veteran Affairs on any of the BD Pyxis systems. As noted above, we came up with a pricing model for the DB Pyxis Medstation, but we were unable to find anything further related to pricing of these systems. We did find information on the BD website pertaining to the use of each of these systems.

NOTE ON MEDICAL DEVICE PRICING
A peer reviewed book located on NCBI talks about current pricing models of medical devices and how pricing models are often not divulged to the public in order to mark prices up when the opportunity strikes. Price inflation happens for a number of reasons. One reason is low market competition for certain items. Another reason brought up was how generous insurance coverage allows for inflation of procedural costs to the patient. A third reason expressed was, commonly buyers of medical devices are unfamiliar with the products they are purchasing, this renders the relationship asymmetrical. In the case of such an asymmetrical relationship, the seller is at much more of an advantage when the buyer is not even aware of price points when contacting a company. For these reasons, it is reasonable to assume that BD folllows the industry standard, and does not provide pricing information publicly.
FINDINGS
The Premium BD Pyxis Medstation 4000 Package is offered for $49,999, this includes the unit, free installation, free shipping, practice medicines, console with monitor and 1-year service agreement.
BD Pyxis systems include the Medstation, ProceudreStation, CathRack, C^(II)Safe, SupplyCenter, and Anesthesia System. The ProcedureStation may be fitted with the Tissue and Implant module or RFID system. The Anesthesia System comes in the system 4000 and ES system versions. The Medstation comes as is or in the ES system.
SUMMARY
Since we were unable to locate direct sources related to the pricing models on most of the BD Pyxis systems, we can reasonably assume that the pricing models of each unit are similar to that of the BD Pyxis Medstation. Otherwise, we suggest placing a call or an email to the sales department at BD responsible for these units.

BD PYXIS SALES CONTACT INFORMATION

Phone: 1-800-366-3330
Link to the sales department email.

Part
11
of twelve
Part
11

Tracking Technology in Hospital ORs - Tracs4Life

Tracs4Life uses a firm-fixed-price model for its hospital tracking technology. Your requested information is also prepared for you in column M of the attached spreadsheet. Below you will find a deep dive of my findings.

TRACS4LIFE PRICING MODEL

Tracs4Life does not publish its pricing model or similar details on its website. Instead, it instructs clients to fill out a web form to request more information. However, I found two federal contracts showing Tracs4Life's pricing model.

A 2015-2016 Department of Defense (DoD) contract shows an agreement to pay Biomedical Synergies, Inc. the sum of $26,092.44 for a Tracs4life "Option 2" package. The product/service code 6515 is described as including medical and surgical instruments, equipment and supplies. Tracs4Life's Option 2 services package presumably tracks all these products in the medical army center in Wayzata, Minnesota. The contract pricing type was set down as a firm-fixed-price model.

Also, a 2016 contract by the DoD Regional Health Contracting Office-Central in Texas stated that it has decided to "award a firm-fixed-price sole source contract to Biomedical Synergies" for a monthly web server subscription to TRACS4Life's Tissue Management and Tracking System.

Based on these two contracts, Tracs4Life seems to use a firm-fixed-price model for monthly web server subscription valid for a full fiscal year. This pricing model is an all-in package including all base and options value, such as installation and training fees. There was no publicly available information regarding coverage such as number of hospital rooms, products tracked, etc. However, the 2016 contract shows that the agreement was for the entire William Beaumont Army Medical Center in Fort Bliss, Texas.

An earlier contract written by the Department of Defense in 2013-2014 did not show a pricing model but indicated that the purchased software subscription included technical support and software upgrades.

Aside from these, I did not find other hospital and client contracts for Tracs4Life. Biomedical Synergies also declared in 2016 (latest available data from Inside Gov) that its sole contractor is the Department of Defense.

CONCLUSION

To wrap it up, Tracs4Life uses a firm-fixed-price model for monthly web server subscription valid for a full fiscal year. This pricing model seems to cover all base and options value including installation and training fees. The 2016 contract between Tracs4Life and the Department of Defense also shows that the agreement covers an entire medical army center.

Your requested information is also prepared for you in column M of the attached spreadsheet.
Part
12
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Part
12

Tracking Technology in Hospital ORs - McKesson Tissue Manager

While McKesson doesn't provide pricing information for McKesson Tissue Manager on its website, I found two contracts that suggest the software operates on a one-time licensing fee with an additional annual support fee. Some hospitals might also need to purchase additional hardware to take advantage of Tissue Manager's capabilities. I've added details on this model to the attached spreadsheet; read on for a few additional notes!

OVERVIEW

I first searched McKesson's website for information on pricing for McKesson Tissue Manager. None exists there; they ask that potential customers contact them to get a quote that fits their needs.

Next, I searched for McKesson product catalogs, case studies, or contracts involving McKesson Tissue Manager. I found two contracts, but both are relatively old (2012 and 2014). Since this was the only information I could find I've included it, but it should be considered a rough approximation of the model as prices may have changed in the intervening years.

The 2012 contract, which is less detailed, only mentions a fee of $12,405 for the Tissue Manager software. The 2014 contract is much more detailed. San Joaquin General Hospital adopted both McKesson Tissue Manager and Patient Tracker. Their costs for Tissue Manager included a $17,500 one-time software license (list price for that license is $35,000), a $3,500 maintenance fee recurring annually, $5,415 in specialty hardware (including a thermal printer and 10 barcode scanners), and $2,784 in software support sessions fees.

CONCLUSION

Based on contracts from San Joaquin General Hospital and Westchester County Health Corporation, I've added information on the pricing model for McKesson Tissue Manager to the attached spreadsheet.
Sources
Sources