Toys Redo

Part
01
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Part
01

Toy Industry Experts - REDO

The toy industry experts detailed below are Scott Steinberg, Steve Reece, Reyne Rice, Deb de Sherbinin, Peggy Brown and Juli Lennett. Steinberg, is a top consultant in the video and game industry, Reece specializes in toy business consulting, Rice is considered to be a toy trend expert, De Sherbinin specializes in developing and launching toy products, Brown is a multifaceted expert with experience in invention and design and Lennett is an industry adviser for the NPD group's U.S. toy division.

Six US based industry experts were detailed in this report, they all are extremely successful toy industry consultants and have significant experience in the international toy and game industries. Below are the names of each expert with a short bio summarizing their experience and expertise, contact details are provided for all experts aside from Peggy Brown, for whom they could not be found, however her website does provide a contact form, for which a link has been included.

Scott Steinberg

Associated Press, Forbes, NPR and USA Today all hail Steinberg is a top consultant, focusing in the toy and video game industry. Steinberg has been used by numerous industry-leading firms for information on the most popular toys, and general technology trends. He holds expertise in business strategy, market research, hardware service testing, media training and editorial and video production, and many more.

Steinberg is currently head of TechSavvy Global, a consulting firm which has helped in the creation and launching of products and services from a number of international brands including MTV and Hollywood Video. He has a Linkedin profile and can be contacted on 888-507-2246 (Dan Dwight).

Steve Reece

Reece is a veteran in the toy industry. He is considered to be an expert in toys and specializes in toy business consultancy, product representation and sourcing of toys. He is the founder of Kid Brand Insight which is a 'toy expert consultancy' assisting the toy, game and overall kids entertainment industries.

Reece can be contacted directly on steve@kidsbrandinsight.com, he has a presence on both Linkedin and Twitter.

Reyne Rice

Rice has over 15 years experience in the toy industry. She is the CEO of Toy Trends, a consultancy which she has owned since 2003. She is considered by many to be a toy trend expert and a knowledgeable voice in the toy industry. Lennett has advised on a number of toy trends, including those for kids and families as well as games, technology and entertainment. She is a global toy trend hunter. She is an industry analyst, media spokesperson, media influencer and journalist, who, alongside her vast toy industry experience has 30 years experience in marketing, research and analysis of both the youth market and the toy industry.

Lennett can be contacted on reyne@reynerice.com, she has a presence on Linkedin and her company has a Twitter profile.

Deb de Sherbinin

De Sherbinin is a consultant who specializes in toys, games and entertainment. She is the founder and CEO of Kidsmart. She attended Boston College and has over 26 years experience in the toy industry. Within her consultant role, she has focused on helping companies to successfully develop brands, launch products and promote them to a wide range of audiences.

She can be contacted on info@kidsmartusa.com, she has a Linkedin profile and her company has a Twitter feed.

Peggy Brown

Brown is a creative consultant, she has worked with some of the largest companies in the toy, game and kids entertainment industries. She has a Fine Arts degree and is a multifaceted expert, holding roles in invention, design, writing, creative design, consultancy as well as being an executive. In November 2009, Brown received the Toy and Game Indudstry Excellence Award (TAGIE) for Excellence in Game Design.

Direct contact details were unavailable for Brown, however her website does contain a "contact us" form. She also has a Linkedin profile.

Juli Lennett

Lennett is the senior vice president of the NPD Group as well as an industry adviser for the Group's US toy division. She has worked at the NPD Group for 11 years and has consulted to a variety of manufacturers, licensers and retailers in the toy industry. In her role as the NPD group's US industry spokesperson, Lennett works with manufacturers and retailers to advise on industry trends and opportunities for growth. She can be contacted at (516) 625 2203 (Marissa Guyduy). She has a Linkedin profile.

In summary, above are the details of six toy industry experts who have a wide range of experience in a number of fields including toy industry business strategy, product representation, industry analysis, product launches, toy invention and identification of opportunities for growth.
Part
02
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Part
02

Toy Purchasing Trends - REDO

Nearly half of shoppers worldwide prefer to do research relating to toy purchases online, while 39% actually make their toy purchases online. Online shoppers primarily use personal computers, while a smaller number of shoppers use smartphones and tablets. China, Poland, Italy, and Vietnam are the countries with the most online shoppers, whereas the Philippines, Belgium, and Switzerland are the countries with the most in-store shoppers.

TOY RESEARCHING TRENDS

According to a global 2017 study, 45% of shoppers prefer to perform online research on toy purchases. Of these shoppers, 28% prefer using personal computers, 10% prefer using smartphones, and 6% prefer using tablets. Alternatively, 26% of customers prefer to do in-store research before buying.

The same study shows that shoppers in the Philippines prefer doing online research more than shoppers in the rest of the world, with 43% of global online research coming from the Philippines. While only 10% of shoppers worldwide prefer using smartphones for their researching needs, 31% of Chinese shoppers prefer using mobile devices for toy research.

TOY PURCHASING TRENDS

When it comes to purchasing toys, 39% of shoppers make their toy purchases online, while 37% prefer to make their purchases in store, according to a 2017 survey. The same survey shows that 24% of online shoppers use personal computers for their purchasing needs, while 8% prefer using smartphones, and 6% use tablets.

Out of the 39% who prefer making online purchases, 71% live in China, 52% in Poland, and 50% in Italy and Vietnam. The Chinese prefer using mobile devices for their purchasing needs, while shoppers in Poland, Italy, and Vietnam prefer using personal computers.

Of those who prefer making in-store purchases, 52% reside in the Philippines, 50% in Belgium, and 49% in Switzerland. Shoppers in China and the United Kingdom are the countries that are least likely to shop in-store.

The online toy industry has seen a significant growth in the last five years, and a 2017 study showed that between 2016 and 2017, 20% of shoppers worldwide made either all or most of their toy-related purchases online.

One factor contributing to surges in online purchasing trends is the growth of mobile internet usage. This mobile usage has also resulted in the rise of mobile gaming, which is now considered to be a mainstream entertainment platform. In-game purchases are becoming a large part of video game revenue, and these types of purchases also fuel online toy and gaming purchasing trends.

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, roughly 40% of shoppers prefer purchasing toys online. Most online shoppers prefer using personal computers, and the country with the most online shoppers is China. The country with the most in-store shoppers is the Philippines. Online shopping trends are growing, especially with the increase in mobile internet and gaming usage.
Part
03
of four
Part
03

Technology Applied to Toy Purchasing - REDO

OVERVIEW
In completing this request, we first examined who makes purchase decisions for toys and games, then we looked at what media most influenced children and where and how the purchase is completed. Finally, we researched on how technology is applied in the entire process.

This 2016 report shows that although parents pay for the products, 85% of the time, children decide what toys to buy and the parents will go by their wishes. Since the technology children aged 0-8 are most exposed to the most is television, this is the media that most influences their choice of what to buy. However, when it is time to make purchase decisions, parents will read reviews online and seek product information before they buy. They buy either online or in-store. For those who buy in-store, they will compare prices 54% of the time and also search for coupons or discounts with their mobile phones before they make a purchase as shown in this 2017 report. They may also use their mobile phones to access retailer app.

WHAT INFLUENCES TOYS SHOPPED
Children’s purchase decisions are being engineered by exposure. In this 2016 survey, 75% of US parents say they expose their children under 6 years to technology (TV, Computers and smartphones) about 2 hours every day. We can understand why TV advertising is playing a big role in determining what toys children should buy. In 2016, parents said 85% of the time they will bow to their children’s wishes and wants for toy purchase decisions.

This 2017 study shows that children aged 0-8 are exposed to 2hours and 13 minutes of TV, DVD/Video, Mobile and computer use every day. The breakdown by age group for mobile device/television use is shown below:

1. 0-27 minutes
Television
1. 0-229 minutes

HOW TECHNOLOGY IS APPLIED IN PURCHASES
Consumers make purchases online or in-store. The technologies they interact with depend on what type of purchase they are making. A 2017 research shows that 68% of those purchasing video games, will read reviews, research online but only 60% will buy online. While just 16% will research in-store, 28% will make a purchase.
For toys, the same 2017 report says 45% of the shoppers surveyed research online and then 39% make purchases. 26% research in-store while 37% make actual purchases.
Based on the above statistic, we can see that more persons make purchases of toys and games in-store than they do online. The technologies they will use in-store are those available on their smartphones.


MOBILE TECHNOLOGY INFLUENCE ON IN-STORE PURCHASES
After mentioning how children influence toy purchases, the earlier quoted 2016 survey says price promotions/sales and Ratings/reviews also influence buying. This data further corroborates with research on how people use technology during in-store purchases.
As shown by this 2017 report, while in-store, customers interact with technology on their smartphones. Technology is applied in-store as follows:
1. Read reviews and research product information–58%
3. Find and download coupons 40%
Knowledge of this behavior of shoppers has led retailers to respond with the technology that will bring shoppers into their stores or, sometimes, to specific aisles in the store. For example, using Wi-Fi, geolocation and beacon technology retailers can tell when consumers are nearby and send them notifications of where to shop and what they can shop for. Some stores also make it possible to pay via smartphone.
CONCLUSION
To wrap up, technology plays a role at each stage of the purchase circle. Whether the toy/game will be bought online or in-store, the process begins with research. Customers read reviews and then sometimes go in-store to check out discounts before they make a purchase. While they are in the store, they still use their phones to compare prices, look out for coupons to download, scan QR code or access retailer app.

Part
04
of four
Part
04

Technology Used in Retail Shopping - REDO

Toy brands and retailers LEGO, Toys R Us, Target and Hasbro Star Wars have all recently used advanced technologies such as augmented reality to enhance the in-store retail experience. I've provided case studies on these initiatives below, with as much data on each campaign's success as was publicly available; due to the very recent nature of some of these initiatives, no sales data is yet available. Moreover, I've provided clarification on some source dates from the previous response. You'll find a deep dive of my research below.

LEGO
Case study date: December 1, 2017

This Danish toy company has implemented augmented reality technology in retail stores in recent years. In one AR experience, called LEGO Digital Box, in-store customers could hold a screen up to a LEGO box to see a 3D depiction of the LEGO model in the box. In addition, LEGO and Trigger created an in-store AR mobile app, called LEGO In-Store Action. Using this app brings the in-store experience to life for customers, by bringing posters and displays to life, and allowing customers to take AR photos and videos with the AR characters in the store. The app is usable at LEGO stores, Target, Toys R Us, and other retailers. The app has 1-5 million downloads on Google Play, as well as a 4-star rating.

TOYS R US
Case study date: October 2, 2017

This international toy store has also used augmented reality to enhance the in-store experience for customers. Last spring, Toys R Us hosted an AR Easter Egg hunt in its 34 Australian stores. This campaign "was successful in driving in-store traffic, generating 15,000 activations, and gaining tons of exposure through several media outlets." In addition, the company launched an AR mobile app to enhance the in-store experience, known as Play Chaser. The app unlocks AR activities at various stations throughout the store; "In the baby doll aisle, for instance, a cooing, virtual version of a doll on the shelf can be adopted, given a name, and even have its dirty diaper changed. in the basketball station, kids can sweep a ball into the hoop with a swipe of the screen, and compare their scores with others on a leaderboard." The app is gamified, as well, as customers can collect stars, which they can then use to unlock more activities. The app is part of the company's efforts to reinvigorate its business, which is suffering financially. So far, the Play Chaser app has 100,000-500,000 Google Play downloads and a 4-star rating.

TARGET
Case study date: January 10, 2018

This retailer used gamification to drive in-store retail sales of children's toys during the holiday season. Target created a "Holiday Wish" app, enabling children to create a holiday wish list using a 3D animated game experience, and send their list to Santa Claus. Parents could then use this app for their in-store shopping in Target. The app generated nearly 75,000 downloads. Over 100,000 wish lists were created, 61% of users used the app multiple times a week, and the app generated over a million page visits to Target.com. "Over the course of six weeks from app launch to the close of the holiday season, nearly 1.7 million total items were added to Target guest wish lists, for a total sales potential of $92.3 million."

STAR WARS/DISNEY/HASBRO
Case study date: January 10, 2018

In September, Star Wars hosted Force Friday, a merchandising event for the launch of a new line of official Star Wars merchandise. During this event, the brand created an augmented reality experience called "Find the Force". This feature, added to the official Star Wars mobile app, enabled fans to seek out their favorite characters in retail stores. Participating retailers included Disney, Toys R Us, Best Buy, LEGO, and more, with a total of over 20,000 participating retail locations worldwide. "Find the Force" was an AR treasure hunt: by finding AR Star Wars characters in stores, players would collect data chips, and ultimately collect all 15 characters. According to this source and this source, the initiative successfully drove shoppers to stores, generated customer excitement, and promoted merchandise sales. In fact, Hasbro reported that Star Wars merchandise sales were up in Q3 of 2017, corresponding with the event, which the company credits to "robust global retail support of Star Wars: The Last Jedi merchandise" released during the event.

study dates

Below, I've briefly listed the source/study dates for any statistics from the previous response for which the date was not provided in the write-up, for your quick reference.

1) In the first paragraph, under "General Parental Use of Technology", the following data is from a 2015 study:

"85% of Millennial parents say that they use mobile devices while shopping to check reviews and deals for products. 66% of mothers and 49% of fathers report that their number one priority when utilizing mobile devices for shopping is to find a deal. 40% of these same moms and 22% of these dads further claim that they will only shop with mobile coupons/deals. Whenever deals are present, 76% of mothers and 64% of fathers say that they will definitely make a purchase in-store with the mobile deal."

2) In the final section, "Augmented Reality in Retail Shopping", the following statistics are given from this 2017 report:

" In a study that included 200 parents from the United Kingdom, participants were asked to determine whether a traditional ad or an AR experience for a children's toy was more persuasive. The total time that participants spent with the traditional ad amounted to 12 seconds, compared with 83 seconds for the augmented reality ad (691% increase). Afterwards, participants were asked whether they would consider purchasing the toy. 45% of parents that viewed the traditional ad mentioned that they would buy the toy, while 74% of parents that interacted with the AR ad said they would as well (164% increase). "

I hope that helps to clarify the dates. Based on my assessment of the write-up, all of the other stats have source dates referenced in-text.

conclusion

To wrap up, I've provided case studies on in-store use of technology from toy brands Toys R Us, LEGO, Target, and Star Wars. In addition, I've clarified the source dates for some of the statistics from the previous response.

Technology Applied to Toy Purchasing

OVERVIEW


In completing this request, we first examined who makes purchase decisions for toys and games, then we looked at what media most influenced children and where and how the purchase is completed. Finally, we researched on how technology is applied in the entire process.

This 2016 report shows that although parents pay for the products, 85% of the time, children decide what toys to buy and the parents will go by their wishes. Since the technology children aged 0-8 are most exposed to the most is television, this is the media that most influences their choice of what to buy. However, when it is time to make purchase decisions, parents will read reviews online and seek product information before they buy. They buy either online or in-store. For those who buy in-store, they will compare prices 54% of the time and also search for coupons or discounts with their mobile phones before they make a purchase as shown in this 2017 report. They may also use their mobile phones to access retailer app.

WHAT INFLUENCES TOYS SHOPPED


Children’s purchase decisions are being engineered by exposure. In this 2016 survey, 75% of US parents say they expose their children under 6 years to technology (TV, Computers and smartphones) about 2 hours every day. We can understand why TV advertising is playing a big role in determining what toys children should buy. In 2016, parents said 85% of the time they will bow to their children’s wishes and wants for toy purchase decisions.

This 2017 study shows that children aged 0-8 are exposed to 2hours and 13 minutes of TV, DVD/Video, Mobile and computer use every day. The breakdown by age group for mobile device/television use is shown below:

 Mobile Device 

1. 0-2 — 7 minutes
2. 2–4–58 minutes
3. 5-8–1hr 2 minutes.

Television
1. 0-2 — 29 minutes 
2. 2–4–1hour 9 minutes 
3. 5-8–1hour 4 minutes. 

HOW TECHNOLOGY IS APPLIED IN PURCHASES


Consumers make purchases online or in-store. The technologies they interact with depend on what type of purchase they are making. A 2017 research shows that 68% of those purchasing video games, will read reviews, research online but only 60% will buy online. While just 16% will research in-store, 28% will make a purchase.
For toys, the same 2017 report says 45% of the shoppers surveyed research online and then 39% make purchases. 26% research in-store while 37% make actual purchases.

Based on the above statistic, we can see that more persons make purchases of toys and games in-store than they do online. The technologies they will use in-store are those available on their smartphones.


MOBILE TECHNOLOGY INFLUENCE ON IN-STORE PURCHASES

After mentioning how children influence toy purchases, the earlier quoted 2016 survey says price promotions/sales and Ratings/reviews also influence buying. This data further corroborates with research on how people use technology during in-store purchases.

As shown by this 2017 report, while in-store, customers interact with technology on their smartphones. Technology is applied in-store as follows:
1. Read reviews and research product information–58%
2. Comparing Prices — 54%
3. Find and download coupons — 40%
4. Access retailer app–33%
5. Scan QR Code–22%

Knowledge of this behavior of shoppers has led retailers to respond with the technology that will bring shoppers into their stores or, sometimes, to specific aisles in the store. For example, using Wi-Fi, geolocation and beacon technology retailers can tell when consumers are nearby and send them notifications of where to shop and what they can shop for. Some stores also make it possible to pay via smartphone.


CONCLUSION


To wrap up, technology plays a role at each stage of the purchase circle. Whether the toy/game will be bought online or in-store, the process begins with research. Customers read reviews and then sometimes go in-store to check out discounts before they make a purchase. While they are in the store, they still use their phones to compare prices, look out for coupons to download, scan QR code or access retailer app.
Sources
Sources