Top Stories on StartUps (April 8)

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Top Stories on StartUps (April 8)

An additional 20 articles discussing startups and entrepreneurs on Twitter have been presented in rows 142-161 of the attached spreadsheet.

Selected Findings

  • Forget Unicorns. Startups Should Be Camels: This article talks about four key lessons startups can imitate from camels to survive the harsh entrepreneurial climate. The lessons include managing cost, not subsidizing, limiting capital intake, and focusing long term.
  • Rate-of-learning: The most valuable startup compensation: In this article, Kyle Tibbitts talks about the rate of learning experienced at startups compared to normal jobs. According to the article, the high rate-of-learning experienced at startups is the most valuable compensation for choosing to work at a startup.
  • Cash-Rich Tech Giants Could Provide Alternative to Federal Loans: This article discusses the possibility of major tech companies such as Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Microsoft stepping in to save startups from harsh economic realities caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. According to the article, the four tech companies hold a total of $570 billion in cash and investments.
  • How SaaS Startups Should Plan for a Turbulent Q2: TechCrunch interviewed Matt Murphy as regards the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on SaaS startups and how they should plan for the second quarter of 2020. In response, Murphy stated that he expects B2B startup growth to decrease in the second quarter, which would make it harder for startups with less than 18 months of cash reserve to survive.
  • Luggage Startup Away Announces Big Job Cuts as Sales Plummet: In this article, Away, a luggage startup announced its intentions to lay off 60 corporate employees due to poor sales arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. The 500-person strong startup stated that it took the decision to prepare itself for future hardship as its sales fell 90 percent in recent weeks.

Research Strategy

The requested articles have been selected by utilizing hashtag and non-hashtag searches with Twitter and Twitter's proprietary algorithms for rankings of top articles discussing startups and entrepreneurs. Engagement metrics have been provided for the original post of the article (as ranked by Twitter) and do not take into consideration any additional metrics of subsequently shared posts of the article.
Sources
Sources