Ticket Broker Industry Overview

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Ticket Broker Industry Overview

There are 804 ticket brokers in the United States offering tickets, schedules and seating charts for concerts and sporting events. Among all states in the United States, California (127) and New Jersey (106) have the highest number of ticket brokers.

Number of Ticket Brokers in the United States

  • According to the United States Tickets Association (USTBA), there are 804 ticket brokers in the concert and sports industries.
  • The USTBA represents the professional "Ticket Brokers" in the United States and offers tickets, schedules and seating charts for concerts and sporting events.

Geographic Breakdown

  • California and New Jersey have the highest number of ticket brokers with 127 and 106 concerts and sports ticket brokers, respectively.
  • Illinois, Texas, New York, Massachusetts, Georgia, Ohio, Connecticut, Florida, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Arizona, Michigan, Maryland, and Colorado have 76, 59, 49, 44, 39, 38, 37, 25, 21, 18, 16, 15, 13, 12 and 9 concerts and sports ticket brokers, respectively.
  • New Hampshire and North Carolina have 11 concerts and sports ticket brokers each.
  • Kansas, Rhode Island, Tennessee, and Utah, all have seven Concerts and Sports ticket brokers each.
  • Alabama and Virginia have six Concerts and Sports ticket brokers each.
  • Missouri and Washington have five Concerts and Sports ticket brokers each.
  • New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, and West Virginia have 3 concerts and sports ticket brokers each.
  • Minnesota, Nebraska, Nevada, South Carolina, and Washington D.C., have only two concerts and sports ticket brokers each.
  • Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, South Dakota, and Vermont, have only one Concerts and Sports ticket broker each.
  • Alaska, Arkansas, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Mississippi, Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming do not have any concerts and sports ticket brokers.

Research Strategy:

To identify or estimate the number of ticket brokers in the United States, as well as the geographical breakdown, we leveraged the information provided by the website of the United States Ticket Brokers Association (USTBA). The organization represents the professional "Ticket Brokers" in the United States and offers tickets, schedules and seating charts for concerts and sporting events. From the USTBA's website, we were able to identify the number of concert and sports ticket brokers operating in each state. Kindly note that, while the number of total ticket brokers was not mentioned explicitly, we manually counted the listings for each state to identify the total number of concert and sports ticket brokers in the United States and the geographical breakdown (bifurcation by state).

While data on the number of ticket brokers and the geographic breakdown was readily available, we were unable to provide data on how much ticket brokers earn. To identify this missing data, we commenced our research by searching through websites, databases, white papers and other resources published by Ticket Broker organizations such as the United States Ticket Brokers Association and The National Association of Ticket Brokers (NATB). The two organizations, NATB and USTBA, did not have any report or information that directly provided how much ticket brokers earn or data points to triangulate this information.

Next, we sought to use the reports provided by government agencies such as the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) on the ticket broker industry. The FTC divides the industry into licensed and non-licensed market players, while GAO divides the market into primary and secondary sellers (which comprise both marketplaces and traditional brokers). The conclusion from both reports is that the revenue in the industry cannot be identified due to the dynamic nature of the industry.

We also reckoned that if we could identify the or some of the top brokers in the industry and their respective market share, we could piggyback off these data points to determine the industry revenue. However, a search through the public domain, including news and media articles, industry journals and review websites such as Investmentbank, Forbes, consumeraffairs.com did not provide any new information that was useful, other than general information on the industry such as the ticket trends to watch out for. We also looked for market size reports from the past to see if we can leverage on the old market size and projected cumulative annual growth rate (CAGR) to calculate the current size of the market. The sources we checked only shed more light on the overall ticketing industry and breakdown by events such as movies, concerts, theater, and sports. Any information on the CAGR of the ticket brokers industry in the United States, which could have helped find the current earnings were not available. As highlighted above, one of the major reasons for the lack of revenue information on the industry is due to the dynamic nature of the industry.
Sources
Sources

Quotes
  • "The ticket brokerage market that comprises of internet sites such as StubHub, traditional ticket brokers and individuals selling tickets outside of venues is a $5 billion-dollar industry. "
  • "The industry is forecasted to grow at an annualized rate of 2.7% and is projected to reach $5.8 billion in 2021. The industry's online services are expected increase to 12.2% in 2021. "
Quotes
  • "In major league sports, teams sell up to 30 percent of seats directly to brokers, according to a large primary ticket seller"
  • "In the concert industry, it is unclear how often artists and event organizers sell tickets directly through the secondary market. Any formal agreements would be in business-confidential contracts, according to industry representatives, and artists may be concerned about disclosing them for fear of appearing to profit from high resale prices"