Sub-Group Demographics

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01
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Part
01

Sub-Group Demographics - Kuwait 1

We have provided insights on demographics, social media usage, shopping behavior and other relevant information on Kuwaiti adults ages 25-40 years old.

HELPFUL FINDINGS

Age and gender

  • According to the CIA Fact Book, Kuwait has an overall population of 2,916,467 Of which 33% are in the age group 25-39 years old.
  • Of this age group, 62% are male and 38% are female.

Social media and shopping behaviors

  • Findings from a study by IJCA on 21-30 years old in Kuwait, shows that 90% of the age prefer using WhatsApp, 89% prefer using Instagram, 71% prefer YouTube and 61% prefer using Twitter.
  • People in this age group use social media for different reasons, 72% cultural, 66% social, 65% entertainment and 34% for commercial reasons.
  • 21-30 years old populations in Kuwait did not fully trust social media. 9% states that they trust the information coming from social media platforms, while 23% do not trust at all.
  • According to the Ipsos study, 34% of millennials in Kuwait shop online.
  • In regard to searching for a product, 12% of respondents state that they browse product, stores and restaurants through social media, while 23% prefers traditional advertising such as TV, Newspaper, Magazine, Billboards.

Values and beliefs

  • Majority or 73% of millennials in Kuwait show optimism when it comes to their future in the country.

Hobbies

RESEARCH STRATEGY

We have used different strategies to find information specifically for tech-savvy adults with high income in Kuwait for ages 25-40 years old. We started by looking at different government sites such as the Central Statistical Bureau to find demographic variables such as population representation of the age group 25-40 years old in Kuwait, including how many of them are high-income earners. However, this did not give information on statistics on 25-40 years old, tech-savvy, high-income earners in Kuwait. What we found on this website is general statistics which originally came from the CIA, however, there was no information on income statistics for each age bracket nor how tech-savvy this group is.

Next, we looked for industry reports from Deloitte, Ipsos, IJCA to look for studies about Kuwait age group 25-40 years old. These companies provide global reports, and therefore, they possibly made or conducted one specific for the Kuwait population or millennials to be specific. While we found many studies about millennials, however, most of them were not specific to Kuwait but for generally labeled as GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) which comprises different Gulf countries. The only tidbit of information was provided, but the majority of this information is for general GCC millennials.

Lastly, we looked for specific traditional and digital marketing agencies in Kuwait such as Pencilvent, SparkMEA, OptimizeKW, Raybal and other similar sites. Marketing companies usually provide fact sheet, overview and other marketing publications about specific knowledge in the country they do business with. However, there was limited information for such publications found, and while they indeed do business in the country, many of the information found on these websites were about services offered, list of clients, etc.

The lack of information is due to the specificity of the target subject criteria and the fact that Kuwait and other Gulf countries are too small and are normally grouped in reports.
Part
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Part
02

Sub-Group Demographics - Saudi Arabia 1

After an exhaustive research, we could say that 27% of the total population in Saudi Arabia are tech savvy millennials, from which 85% shop online, 80% visit YouTube, and 45% believe the economy will improve.

KEY INSIGHTS ABOUT SAUDI ARABIAN MILLENNIALS

  • 27% of the Saudi population are millennials.
  • 85% of millennials shop online using their phones.
  • Saudi millennials have a positive outlook towards economic progression with 45% of them believing the economy will improve compared to global average of 26%.
  • 50% Saudi Arabia millennials have ambitions to be promoted to a senior level in their line of work compared to 34% of global millennials who think the same.
  • 58% of Saudi millennials have ambitions to start their own business while only 38% of the global millennials have the same ambition.
  • 70% of the millennials in Saudi Arabia believe that their business will succeed in case they start them.
  • 80% of Saudi millennials visit YouTube.
  • 82% of Saudi millennials visit YouTube to learn something new.

AVERAGE SPENDING BY MILLENNIALS ON ONLINE STORES

  • Millennials spent $744 on travel for business.
  • Millennials spent $731 on travel for leisure.
  • Millennials spent $487 on electronics.
  • Millennials spent $262 on clothing.
  • Millennials spent $40 on take away food.
Part
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Part
03

Sub-Group Demographics - Bahrain 1

While information specific to tech-savvy adults in Bahrain with high incomes and between the ages of 25-40 is unavailable in the public domain, there are some insights on banking and payment behaviors, values and beliefs, and hobbies pertaining to Bahraini millennials.

Banking and payments behaviors

  • An expanding user base filled with tech-savvy millennials and the improved internet speed and dependability are forging Bahrain's future and forming a positive forecast for the installation of mobile payments and banking.

Values and beliefs

  • Most millennials in Bahrain admit that their Islamic beliefs originate from them being raised through the faith.
  • Most millennials in Bahrain concur that the government must ensure that religious rhetoric does not provoke violence and rancor. They also agree that if TV programs and films violate society's ethical and moral standards, the government must outlaw them.[
  • A reported 31% of millennials in Bahrain believe that religion is most crucial.
  • Around 42% of millennials in Bahrain choose religion as their primary source of personal identity.
  • Nearly one-third (27%) of millennials in Bahrain choose their Arabian heritage as their chief source of personal identity.
  • Almost half (45%) of millennials in Bahrain have a friend or acquaintance who practices a different faith.
  • Up to 93% of millennials in Bahrain agree that “religion is just about beliefs and laws that define the boundaries of right and wrong.”
  • More than two-thirds (88%) of millennials in Bahrain agree that religion is an intimate spiritual matter.
  • The Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center (GFLEC) reported that in 2017, 39% of Bahraini millennials (age 15-34) were financially literate, while for adults, it was 40%.
  • At least 92% of millennials within the GCC region (Oman, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, United Arab Emirates, and Qatar) acknowledge that climate change threatens the world.

Hobbies

Research Strategy:

Our research began by consulting credible sources such as government sites, statistics, and surveys. We visited sites like the Central Statistical Bureau, Statista, Central Intelligence Agency, and YouGov to find demographic variables such as population representation of those between 25-40 years old in Bahrain, including the number of high-income earners. However, this strategy did not yield statistics on those who are 25-40 years old, tech-savvy, high-income earners in Bahrain. On the YouGov site, we found information on millennials in the GCC region (which includes Bahrain) who view climate change as a threat. However, this is not specific to tech-savvy millennials with a high income.
Next, we searched for industry reports from Deloitte, Ipsos, PEW, Kantar, and MarketResearch to look for studies centered on the specified age group in Bahrain. These websites provide global reports, and we assumed they possibly conducted one specific to the Bahrain population, specifically millennials. However, we could not find information about tech-savvy adults with high income in Bahrain. Instead, we found a report from Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center (GFLEC), which displayed the financial literacy among millennials and adults.
Finally, we looked for traditional and digital marketing agencies in Bahrain such as EpaySummit, Winchester-Media, and Perpetualtc, and other similar sites. Marketing companies usually provide fact sheets, an overview, and other marketing publications about specific knowledge in the country they conduct business with. However, there was limited information from such publications. While they do business in the Bahrain, much of the information we came across concerned services offered, list of clients, etc.
Due to the absence of relevant data, we were unable to provide insights on tech-savvy adults with high income in Bahrain. The lack of information was due to the specificity of the target subject criteria.
Part
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Part
04

Sub-Group Demographics - Kuwait 2

After an exhaustive search through several credible sources, it appears that valuable insights on high-income foreigners in Kuwait, including their shopping and online/social media behaviors, is unavailable in the public domain. However, at least two-thirds of Kuwait's population is expatriates.

Other useful insights

  • Around 70% of the total population of Kuwait is made up of expatriates and 60% is Arab (includes expatriates).
  • Kuwait's non-national population consists of Indians (825,000), Egyptians (517,973), Bangladeshis (181,265), Syrians (140,000), Pakistanis (126,000), Filipinos (185,788), Sri Lankans (130,000), Ethiopians (74,000), Jordanians and Palestinians (10,000), Nepalians (62,000), Iranians (50,000), Lebanese (42,000), Indonesians (8,887), Iraqis (16,000), Afghans (15,000), Americans (13,000), and Yemenis (11,000).
  • Distinct measures are now being undertaken to place additional restrictions on the selection of foreign laborers for hire. To support the recruitment of young graduates from the nation, the federal government in Kuwait has developed a strategy to block hiring expatriates below 30 years-of-age possessing college degrees following July 2018. Also, around 44,500 foreign workers operating within the government sector are expected to be replaced by Kuwaiti citizens in the future. Furthermore, the government has taken aim at expatriates' social rights such as rejecting visas for expats’ parents and increasing foreign residents' healthcare fees.
  • According to the Public Authority for Civil Information, for the 144,000 expatriate workers in the public sector, the average monthly salary is KD 691, while those employed in the private sector generate KD 251.
  • According to a study from the Kuwait College of Science and Technology, 68% of people in Kuwait favor online shopping. Additionally, 52% of the services and products bought online are reportedly repeated up to five times each month. More than 60% of consumers favor buying shoes and garments online.
  • In Kuwait, five top high paying occupations include IT Manager, University Professor (Assistant), Doctor/Specialist, Chartered Accountant and Engineer.

Research Strategy:

To identify insights on foreigners/expats with high incomes in Kuwait, we initially searched for white papers, blogs, studies, and surveys published by Inter Nation, Gulf Migration, World Population Review, and Expat, among others. These organizations generally provide an overview of lifestyle in the country. However, the sources merely addressed overall demographics of Kuwait and policies designed for expats, irrespective of income. This strategy did not yield any substantial results pertaining to their online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, demographic data, values and beliefs, attitude towards work, or hobbies.

Next, we searched through studies conducted to describe Kuwaitis as consumers and looked for any segmentation of consumers, including high income foreigners/expats. With this approach, we shifted gear towards marketing perspective of businesses which serve high income consumers in Kuwait. We conducted a deep dive to check social media groups and advertiser perspectives on how they target these customers and if they have any profile of the target shoppers. We referred to sources such as papers published by Oxford Business Group and ResearchGate, highlighting the consumer behavior of Kuwaitis in general. Unfortunately, the sources only shared overall consumer behavior in the country, and the target audience was not defined.

Afterward, we searched for any statistics pertaining to income distribution, lifestyle, prevalence of social media, and other behavioral attributes of expats in Kuwait that could have contributed in finding the relevant insights. We thoroughly scoured through articles and journals published on the aforementioned subjects in local news sources such as Kuwait Times, Arab Times Online, Times Kuwait, and The Arab Weekly, among many others. The majority of the sources discussed recent changes in policies designed for expats to improve the living conditions of Kuwaiti nationals, which are a distinct minority in their own coun­try. Therefore, this particular strategy failed.

We then attempted to broaden the research criteria by looking for information on big employers of foreigners in Asia with the goal of capturing company reports on publications on their employee lifestyle and behavior, which can be extrapolated as insights on high-income foreigners in Kuwait. We reviewed websites such as Cadogantate, GulfTalent, Expacare, Bayt, Hays, NADIA, and others. Nonetheless, most of the recruiting agencies were not segmented country-wise and no common traits could be garnered to identify the required information.

Lastly, we searched for high income professions in Kuwait that mostly hire expats or foreigners. The idea was to triangulate by individually studying the online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, values and beliefs, attitude towards work, and hobbies of the professionals where expats are a majority. While we were able to identify high-income professions in Kuwait in resources published by job portals like Naukri Gulf and 248am, among others, we were unable to determine which of these professions mostly consist of expats/foreigners to attempt further triangulation.

As a result of the lack of relevant data, we were unable to offer the requested insights on high-income foreigners in Kuwait. According to our research, all the latest sources reveal the need for improving the lifestyle of Kuwaiti nationals, which are a distinct minority in the nation. Any studies/surveys on a public platform that could be used to understand online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, any demographic data, values and beliefs, attitude towards work, and hobbies pertain to the country's overall population and not just the high income expats in country.
Part
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Part
05

Sub-Group Demographics - Saudi Arabia 2

After an exhaustive search of market reports, publications by consulting firms and government parastatals, articles, expert analysis, and articles, details about the online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, demographic data, values and beliefs, attitude towards work, and hobbies of high-income foreigners in Saudi Arabia was limited in the public domain. However, we were able to provide limited information on how much foreigners earn in the country.

DEMOGRAPHIC DATA OF EXPATS WITH HIGH-INCOME IN SAUDI ARABIA

  • European and American expats are usually the high-income earners in Saudi Arabia earning more than 14,000 Saudi riyals monthly.
  • The highest-paid industry in Saudi Arabia is the engineering industry with an annual salary of almost $67,000.
  • "Most westerners and skilled Arabs have highly paid jobs with great benefits and live in plumb housing compounds in luxury apartments or villas with a swimming pool and great facilities."
  • There are only 0.1% of Western expats who are high earners that are based in Saudi Arabia.
  • American and European expats in Saudi Arabia usually live in compounds.
  • Helpful Findings

    GENERAL INSIGHTS ABOUT FOREIGNER/EXPATS IN SAUDI ARABIA

    • According to Business Insider, the average income of foreigners in Saudi Arabia is $99,615.
    • According to The Independent, 70% of expats in think that they earn more in Saudi Arabia compared to their own country.
    • Forty-two percent of expats in Saudi Arabia think that they earn a lot more of what they can think of.
    • Twenty-two percent of expats in Saudi Arabia think that they have high disposable household income more than what they need.
    • Fifteen percent of expats in Saudi Arabia are skilled workers and 85% of them are working in agriculture, cleaning and domestic service.

    Research Strategy:

    To provide the online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, demographic data, values and beliefs, attitude towards work, and hobbies of high-income foreigners in Saudi Arabia, we commenced our research by searching for articles, news reports, journals, and publications. We were expecting to find direct relevant information on the subject matter, as Saudi Arabia is one of the top 10 countries where expat workers are in the demand. We looked through media publications such as Forbes, The New York Times, Business Wire, and Business Insider. Unfortunately, we did not find any related data that could help build a robust answer to this particular query. Our findings revealed that expats are decreasing and nothing, in particular, was related to our query.

    Secondly, we tried to look for any information in government databases like the General Authority for Statistics and the Ministry of Labor and Social Development. We reckoned that maybe from there we could locate relevant statistics and/or information on online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, values and beliefs, attitude towards work, and hobbies about foreigners with high-income in Saudi Arabia. The results of our search only pointed to new taxes that expats are required to pay in Saudi Arabia, as well as other related law and regulation they implement. Unfortunately, there was no information about the statistics and/or information on online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, values and beliefs, attitude towards work, and hobbies about foreigners with high-income in Saudi Arabia.

    Lastly, we attempted to make inferences from multiple sources in order to build a profile of foreigners with high-income in Saudi Arabia. For example, we sought to identify the country or region high-income foreigners in Saudi Arabia belong to and use this to identify their behaviors in the country. Using this approach, we were able to identify that high-income earners in Saudi Arabia are American and European expats. We tried looking for articles that would expound on the behavior of these groups in Saudi Arabia to no avail. However, we found a report behind a paywall, which could provide insights on Americans living in Saudi Arabia. Asides this report, we were unable to locate any relevant information on the online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, demographic data, values and beliefs, attitude towards work, and hobbies of high-income foreigners in Saudi Arabia.

    Part
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    Part
    06

    Sub-Group Demographics - Bahrain 2

    The majority of high-income foreigners are very favorable of their experiences living and working in Bahrain. Friendly people, quality of digital life, high disposable income, and a variety of shopping and leisure activities to enjoy are all reasons for their great satisfaction.

    Demographics

    • Expats in Bahrain have higher earnings than the worldwide average, and twice as many have an annual household income of over $200,000.
    • The majority of high-income foreigners in Bahrain are males.

    Values and Beliefs

    Online/Social Media

    • Bahrain was ranked 12th out of 68 countries for its quality of digital life in an InterNations survey, and Bahrain was highly rated by the majority of expats for the availability to access administrative and government services and to pay without cash online.
    • 80% of expats surveyed were also happy with their access to social media in Bahrain and enjoy using social media to connect with friends and family who are not living in Bahrain.

    Work and Hobbies

    • Most high-income expats working in Bahrain have been recruited outside of the country by an agency or transferred with their company, and many expats gave their overall satisfaction with working in Bahrain the best possible rating, ranking it at the top of the Working Abroad Index.
    • Most high-income foreigners have a higher disposable income working in Bahrain than they would working in their own country, and they enjoy shopping at the many malls and stores in the area that cater to their preferences.
    • Other hobbies of high-income expats in Bahrain include water sports like sailing, boating, and scuba diving.

    Research Strategy

    We first researched statistics and information about high-income foreigners in Bahrain like Gulf Labour Markets and Migration, Expat, and InterNations. We then gathered additional data about their beliefs and behaviors to complete our findings.


    Part
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    Part
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    Sub-Group Demographics - Kuwait 3

    The majority of Kuwaitis strongly follow Kuwaiti cultural practices and remain traditionalists/conservatives and are willing to pay more to support the local product of Kuwait. Unfortunately, no information on the online and social media behaviors, demographics, attitude towards work, and hobbies of traditionalists in Kuwait was available in the public domain. Below is an overview of the information that was available.

    INSIGHTS ON TRADITIONALISTS IN KUWAIT

    Values and Beliefs

    • The majority of Kuwaitis strongly follow Kuwaiti cultural practices and remain traditionalists/conservatives.
    • They believe in praying five times a day and give women no voting rights.
    • Conservatives of Kuwait value male dominance. They believe that homosexual acts, use of alcohol, and live-ins are illegal.

    Shopping Behaviors

    • As per a survey from the International Journal of Business, Marketing, and Decision Sciences, Kuwaiti traditionalists are willing to pay more to support the local products of Kuwait.
    • Similarly, Kuwaiti traditionalists also believe that they need to choose foreign products if local products are not available.

    RELEVANT INSIGHTS ON PEOPLE OVER 50 IN KUWAIT

    Demographic Data

    • Around 8% of the population in Kuwait is composed of people older than 55 years.
    • The percentage of persons older than 50 years who are illiterate is 10-20%.
    • The percentage of Kuwaitis older than 50 years who have attained a primary school education is 8-11 %.
    • Approximately 19-20% of persons older than 50 years in Kuwait have attained a secondary school education.

    Online/Social Media Behaviors

    Facebook

    • The percentage of Facebook users who fall in the age group 55-64 years is 2.8% and those above 65 years is 1.1%.
    • The percentage of female Facebook users who fall in the age group 55-64 years is 0.7%, whereas 0.4% of women older than 65 use Facebook.
    • The percentage of male Facebook users who fall in the age group 55-64 years is 2.1%, whereas 0.7% of men older than 65 years use Facebook.

    Instagram

    • The percentage of Instagram users who fall in the age group 55-64 years is 1.6% and those older than 65 years is 0.7%.
    • The percentage of female Instagram users in the age group 55-64 years is 0.6%, whereas 0.3% of women older than 65 years use Instagram.
    • The percentage of male Instagram users in the age group 55-64 years is 1.0%, whereas 0.4% of men older than 65 years use Instagram.

    Messenger

    • The percentage of Messenger users in the age group 55-64 years is 2.5% and those above 65 years is 1.0%.
    • The percentage of female Messenger users in the age group 55-64 years is 0.6%, whereas 0.4% of women older than 65 years use Messenger.
    • The percentage of male Messenger users in the age group 55-64 years is 1.9%, whereas 0.6% of men older than 65 years use Messenger.

    Hobbies


    Attitude Towards Work

    • Kuwaitis older than 50 years are interested in working in non-governmental organizations followed by domestic servants and last governmental organizations.
    • Kuwaitis older than 50 years are more interested in working in sales service followed by monitor production and third as regular work professionals.


    RESEARCH STRATEGY

    Initially, we searched for readily available information on traditionalists in Kuwait with respect to their online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, demographic data, values and beliefs, attitude towards work, and hobbies across various media reports, articles, and press releases (such as Kuwait Visa, Every Culture, NCBI, World Atlas, and others) and could find some information on their values but could not find specific insights on the other topics mentioned.

    As there was no readily available information, we looked for information on traditionalists in world data reports and tried to triangulate Kuwait's share of them. Furthermore, we attempted to derive insights on online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, demographic data, values and beliefs, attitude towards work, and hobbies from various surveys, scientific journals, case studies, and GCC reports (such as Euromonitor, KV Tech, The Daily Star, Eshop World); however, most of the information is on traditionalist consumers is general. There was no mention on segmentation of Kuwaitis.

    Because data was scarce, we assumed that data related to the elderly (50+ years) highlights data for traditionalists or conservatives based on their age and we looked for information specific to this age group across various demographic reports (such as Napolean Cat, Trading Economics, The National, Index Mundi, Kuwait Statistical reports). We were able to find details on online/social media behaviors, hobbies, attitude towards work, and demographic data of people over 50-years but could not find anything specific on the shopping behaviors of traditionalists in Kuwait and any information which confirms that 50-year-old persons in Kuwait are traditionalists or conservatives.

    As a last resort, we expanded the scope of search beyond the timeline of 24 months to find any trends or changes in behavior of traditionalists in Kuwait across cultural and historical reports of Kuwait and university publications (in sources such as Researchgate, Sagepub, Carnegie Melon University, English Alarabiya) and found an old survey study on the "Effect of Culture and Traditions on Consumer Behavior in Kuwait," but could not find any relevant data further.



    Part
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    Part
    08

    Sub-Group Demographics - Saudi Arabia 3

    Traditionalists in Saudi Arabia are in a minority and struggle to adjust to the more moderate beliefs of both the majority and of the crown prince who is currently in power. The changing social boundaries of men and women in Saudia Arabia compete against more conservative government policies like internet censorship to reach a balance in a country where traditional conservatives can still feel at home.

    Demographics

    • Saudi Arabians over 54 years old who tend to be more traditional account for less than 10% of the total population.
    • Saudi Arabians who have traditional conservative beliefs are approximately 23% of the total population.

    Values and Beliefs

    • Traditionalists in Saudi Arabia value a strict form of Islam that is modeled after the practices of the prophet Mohammed during the 7th century.
    • Traditionalists in Saudi Arabia have conservative beliefs about the social boundaries of men and women in society and believe that they should not intermingle in public.
    • Traditional conservatives in Saudi Arabia also believe that they are becoming like strangers in their own country.

    Online/Social Media

    • Traditionalists support and adhere to the conservative censorship by the government of online behavior in Saudi Arabia that blocks categories like provocative attire, general news, dating/ social, history, and drugs.
    • Traditionalists in Saudi Arabia are more cautious though in their social media behavior overall due to a loss of influence with the crown prince Mohammed bin Salman.

    Shopping Behaviors

    • Traditionalists in Saudi Arabia are accustomed to haggling when they shop for goods in the many outdoor markets there.
    • Traditionalists also still enjoy shopping in the more modern mall culture of Saudi Arabia that retains many of the conservative social boundaries regarding dress, prayer, and interactions between males and females.

    Work and Hobbies

    Research Strategy

    We first researched statistics and information about traditionalists in Saudi Arabia from multiple credible sources like The Washington Post, National Public Radio, and the Embassy of Saudi Arabia websites, and we included the most recent demographics about this specific group that were publicly available. We then continued our research to learn more about their beliefs and behaviors to complete our findings.
    Part
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    Part
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    Sub-Group Demographics - Bahrain 3

    From research findings, 2.1% of Bahrain's population aged 55-64 use Instagram, whereas 3.1% of Bahrain's population aged 55-64 use Facebook, and 2.7% of Bahrain's population aged 55-64 use Messenger. Additionally, nepotism is viewed very highly and positively in Bahrain, along with loyalty to the family.

    BAHRAIN DEMOGRAPHICS PROFILE 2018

    WORKFORCE

    • 38.2% of population aged 50-54 with no education, are active in the labor force.
    • 38.21% of population aged 55-59 with no education, are active in the labor force.
    • 75.32% of population aged 65-69 with no education, are active in the labor force.

    EDUCATION

    • 5.44% of the population aged 50-54 completed primary schooling.
    • 26.08% of the population aged 50-54 completed secondary schooling.
    • 4.96% of the population aged 55-59 completed primary schooling.
    • 25.37% of the population age 55-59 completed secondary schooling.
    • 2.68% of the population age 65-69 completed primary schooling.
    • 9.88% of the population age 65-69 completed secondary schooling.

    SOCIAL MEDIA BEHAVIORS

    INSTAGRAM
    • 2.1% of Bahrain's population aged 55-64 uses Instagram, whereas 0.9% of Bahrain's population that uses Instagram are 65 years or older.
    • 0.7% of women aged 55-64 use Instagram, whereas 0.3% of women aged 65+ use Instagram.
    • 1.4% of men aged 55-64 use Instagram, whereas 0.6% of men aged 65+ use Instagram.
    FACEBOOK
    • 3.1% of Bahrain's population aged 55-64 uses Facebook, whereas 1.2% of Bahrain's population that uses Facebook are 65 years or older.
    • 0.8% of women aged 55-64 use Facebook, whereas 0.4% of women aged 65+ use Facebook.
    • 2.3% of men of aged 55-64 use Facebook, whereas 0.8% of men aged 65+ use Facebook.
    MESSENGER
    • 2.7% of Bahrain's population aged 55-64 uses Messenger, whereas 1.1% of Bahrain's population that uses Messenger are 65 years or older.
    • 0.8% of women aged 55-64 use Messenger, whereas 0.4% of women aged 65+ use Messenger.
    • 1.9% of men aged 55-64 use Messenger, whereas 0.7% of men aged 65+ use Messenger.

    HOBBIES/RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES

    SHOPPING BEHAVIOR

    VALUES AND BELIEFS

    RESEARCH STRATEGY:

    To provide insights on traditionalists in Bahrain, we scoured through media publication and news articles from Indexmundi, Napoleoncat, Gulf News, CNN, BBC, NY Times, The Guardian and studies/survey resources like Pew research, Trading Economics among others. We targeted these sources because they were the most likely to report statistics and/or information on the online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, demographic data, values and beliefs, attitude towards work, and their hobbies of traditionalists in Bahrain.

    Although the above sources revealed a lot of information in regard to the demographics, culture, workforce, economics, and beliefs of traditionalists, they did not highlight the exact age or mention the prevalence of traditionalists or conservatives among them. Instead, the sources presented information by age brackets. Consequently, in alignment with the research criteria, we have presented the information for baby boomers and/or older gen xers i.e. over 50 years old along with insights on traditionalists/conservatives.

    Since the publicly available data was scarce, we assumed that data related to elderly highlights the data for traditionalists/conservatives based on their age and in alignment with the research criteria. Elderly people have been defined with mean age of 72.7 years old and have been included to provide a comprehensive overview on the topic. We have also included a source from 2009 and 2014 as no new study was conducted on the recreational activities or hobbies of traditionalists in Bahrain, values and beliefs of traditionalists in Bahrain that highlighted the sub-demographic.
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    Part
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    Sub-Group Demographics - Bahrain 4

    While the top seven insights on women over the age of 40 in Bahrain could not be determined, 90.9% of all women in Bahrain are employed in services. Additionally, in 2017, 64% of Bahraini women earned a relatively low income, and they are currently occupying 15% of the parliament seats.

    GENERAL INFORMATION ON BAHRAINI WOMEN

    • The life expectancy of women in Bahrain is 76 years old.
    • In Bahrain, women between 45 to 55 years old are considered to be in menopausal age.
    • There are 90.9% of Bahraini women employed in services, 3.4% of Bahraini women are unemployed, and only 44% work in the country.
    • In 2017, 64% of Bahraini women had low-income, 45% had a middle- income, and 53% had high-income.
    • Women occupy 15% of the Bahraini parliamentary seats.
    • 63.7% of Bahraini women reached a secondary level of education, while only 57.1% of men reached the same level.
    • The participation women have in the Bahraini labor market is 44%, while men have 87% of participation.
    • Every 100,000 live births a ratio of 15 Bahraini women die from pregnancy-related causes,
    • According to the Bahraini law, "Women of ethnic minority backgrounds are not included in the laws subjected to Muslim ".
    • About the education, the law also says that "women are given equal opportunity and there are no laws prohibiting girls from attending school."
    • Additionally, the Bahrain law says that it is illegal to deny employment to someone based on the gender, which protects pregnant women during their maternity leave.

    RESEARCH STRATEGY

    We were unable to provide insights from statistics, online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, demographics, values, beliefs, attitude towards work, and hobbies of the women over 40 in Bahrain. However, we provided insights about the Bahraini women as a whole.

    As our first strategy, we tried to locate a direct response to their insights through articles, news reports, journals, magazines, etc. Since Bahrain is an open country, and there is plenty information about their citizens online, we expected to find our information through The Gulf News, Bahrain News Agency, News of Bahrain, The New York Times, The Economist, among others; however, most of the information we found was about movements, campaigns promoting women, and equality rights, but no relevant data about women under the desired age group.

    Our second step was searching through government publications/documentation, and national organizations like the Bahrain Women Association, UNICEF, Bahrain Rights, etc. for insights on Bahraini women and age groups. While we found several laws that protect women and that Bahrainis are pushing for gender equality in their country, we noticed that the age ranges in these documents were too general. So we couldn't breakdown the information they offered based on their ages.

    Finally, we tried to triangulate the requested information by using the opinions of experts and uncovering information relevant to our analysis. To find the information requested, we focused our search on media coverage, interviews, media statements, etc.
    We looked for specialists based in Bahrain from areas like psychology, marketing, demographics, law, etc. Unfortunately, the only available information was about menopause and its impact on women over 45 and insights to Bahraini women in general, but not to the group above 40 years old.

    A reason why this information is not available could be because there are still some parts of the Bahraini law that disregard the rights of women. With this in mind, we think that the studies and statistics about them, particularly from this age group, are limited or not publicly available.
    While we couldn't provide insights on statistics, online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, demographics, values, beliefs, attitude towards work, and their hobbies of women over 40 in Bahrain, we provided insightful information of Bahraini women as a whole.
    Part
    11
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    Part
    11

    Sub-Group Demographics - Saudi Arabia 4

    Only 3% of women ages 55 to 74 had gained higher education, only 15.41% of the female population age 40-44 years have completed primary school, and 16.61% of the female population age 40-44 years have completed secondary school in Saudi Arabia. These and other insights can be found below.

    MARRIAGE

    • Saudi women younger than 50 years can take a foreign husband.
    • A Saudi woman has to be between 30 and 50 years of age if she wants to take a non-Saudi husband.

    WORKFORCE

    • Approximately 27.89% of the female population aged 40-44 years with no education, are active in the labor force.
    • Approximately 27.89% of the female population aged 45-49 years with no education, are active in the labor force.
    • Approximately 51.58% of the female population aged 55-59 years with no education, are active in the labor force.

    EDUCATION

    • The percentage of the female population in the age group 40-44 years who have completed primary school is 15.41%, while those that have completed secondary school is 16.61%.
    • The percentage of the female population in the age group 45-49 years who have completed primary school is 15.4%, while those that have completed secondary school is 16.61%.
    • The percentage of the female population in the age group 50-54 years who have completed primary school is 11.29%, while those that have completed secondary school is 9.58%.
    • The percentage of the female population in the age group 55-59 years who have completed primary school is 11.29%, while those that have completed secondary school is 9.58%.

    HIGHER EDUCATION

    • According to the Pew Research Center, only 3% of women ages 55 to 74 in Saudi Arabia had gained higher education, as compared to 16% of men in the same age group.

    SOCIAL MEDIA

    • The percentage of females in Saudi Arabia that started to use social media at the age of 31 years or above is 6.33%.

    SHOPPING BEHAVIOR

    • According to the research titled "Factors Influencing Saudi Customers' Decisions to Purchase From Online Retailers," 42.9% of females respondents age 36 years or older have a lack of experience in buying online.
    • In the same age group, 33.7% of females respondents reported that they do not trust e-retailers in Saudi Arabia.
    • In the same age group, 4.1% of females respondents reported that they do not have easy and fast access to the Internet.
    • Of the female respondents in the same age group, 59.2% reported that they worry about quality as they cannot inspect the product.
    • Of the female respondents in the same age group, 27.6% reported they lack a mailbox for home.
    • According to the study, 34.7% of females respondents age 36 years or older do not know e-retailers in Saudi Arabia, 38.8% are not comfortable paying online using a credit card, 20.4% do not understand what is communicated if the website (or part of it) is in English, and 43.9% don't trust that personal information will remain private.

    TRAVEL

    • By the end of August 2019, Saudi women above the age of 21 will be allowed to travel alone without any male guardians.
    • Women aged 21 and above can get a passport issued or renew their passports and travel outside Saudi Arabia without permission.

    RESEARCH STRATEGY

    To provide at least seven insights on women over 40 in Saudi Arabia, we scoured through media publications and news articles (such as those from the Gulf News, CNN, BBC, NY Times, The Guardian), and studies and surveys (like those from Pew Research, Trading Economics, among others). These sources were used as prima facie as they are most likely to report statistics and/or information on online or social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, demographics, values and beliefs, attitudes towards work, and hobbies. Though the above sources revealed a lot about women, women's rights, and demographics, many publications did not highlight the exact age, instead presented the information by age brackets. We, therefore, assumed that any data on women that highlights information or statistics on women over 40 (like age 36 and above, ages 21 and above, ages 30-50) was relevant to the request and was included to provide a comprehensive overview on the topic. We included a source from 2011 as no more recent study was conducted on the "Factors Influencing Saudi Customers’ Decisions to Purchase From Online Retailers in Saudi Arabia" that highlighted women by age.


    Part
    12
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    Part
    12

    Sub-Group Demographics - Kuwait 4

    There are 1,681,395 women in Kuwait over the age of 40. Of that number, 716,638 are Kuwaiti, and 964,757 are non-Kuwaiti.

    SUB-GROUP DEMOGRAPHICS — KUWAIT 4

    DEMOGRAPHIC DATA

    • There are 1,681,395 women in Kuwait over the age of 40. Of that number, 716,638 are Kuwaiti, and 964,757 are non-Kuwaiti.
    • There are 148,255 women in Kuwait between the ages of 40 and 44.
    • There are 113,277 women in Kuwait between the ages of 45 and 49.
    • There are 80,318 women in Kuwait between the ages of 50 and 54.
    • There are 52,362 women in Kuwait between the ages of 55 and 59.
    • There are 34,096 women in Kuwait between the ages of 60 and 64.
    • There are 49,295 women in Kuwait above the age of 65.
    • Ninety-five percent of women above the age of 15 are literate.

    ONLINE/SOCIAL MEDIA BEHAVIORS

    • In Kuwait, there are 870,000 monthly active female Facebook users; 684,000 monthly active female Instagram users; 420,000 monthly active female Twitter users; 907,500 monthly active female Snapchat users; and 144,000 females registered on LinkedIn.
    • The presence of 4.14 million internet users in Kuwait implies 98% penetration.
    • There are 3.9 million active social media users in Kuwait, which implies 92% penetration. YouTube, Google, and Facebook generate a significant percentage of Kuwait's web traffic. Eighteen percent of women in Kuwait have a credit card, and 38% make online transactions.

    RESEARCH STRATEGY

    We began our investigation with an inquiry into reports, surveys, and statistical databases (e.g., Statistical Reports, internation.org, Central Statistical Bureau of Kuwait, and expat.com) as well as business intelligence sites (e.g., oxfordbusinessgroup.com) and regional news sites (e.g., news.kuwaittimes.net, arabtimesonline.com, middeleastmonitor.com, timeskuwait.com, and thearabweekly.com). This avenue of research yielded the demographic data of Kuwaiti women over the age of 40. However, we were unable to locate detailed information on this demographic group's online/social media behaviors, shopping patterns, values and beliefs, attitudes towards work, and hobbies.

    We first sought the data in the statistical and demographic databases. However, our search yielded only demographic data. There was little to no information on the demographic cohort's behaviors. Our next step was a closer examination of the business intelligence sites. However, this source only provided general consumer behavior and no information for the target group. Our third step was to probe the regional news sites with the expectation of finding some clues to the group's behavior through local information. However, these sites were mostly concerned with shifts in the local political environment and rights gains made by women. Finally, we expanded our search with the hope of finding any information related to what was requested. This strategy yielded some information on online and social media behaviors, but the data were not for the specified age demographic. We have included the data in this report for the sake of completeness.

    We can only conclude that the information (if it does exist) is so specific that it is not widely available.
    Part
    13
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    Part
    13

    Sub-Group Demographics -the Middle East 1

    After an extensive search, the research team was unable to find information on women over 40 in the Middle East in terms of their online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, demographic data (income, location, employment, and/or level of education), values and beliefs, attitude towards work, and their hobbies. This is because women in the Middle East are not outgoing and they have been asked to give preference to their household work. Thus, their ambition towards education and career is very restricted. We have however, listed some useful findings below based on our research.

    SHOPPING BEHAVIORS:

    • Forty-three percent of the Middle East consumers buy products at nearby stores; 86% of the Middle East consumers are active online entertainment users; and 13% of the Middle East consumer are likely to order groceries online.

    DEMOGRAPHIC:

    • Women in the Middle East are better educated than ever before, but they are still held back by discriminatory laws.
    • Women in the Middle East are not very active in their career because of the barriers to their employment.
    • Women on the Middle East do not have the right to make decisions, pursue professions, travel, marry, divorce, inherit or access wealth.
    • The employment outlook for women in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) differs dramatically across countries, classes, and communities with only 24% employed, which is much lower than the 60% across OECD countries.
    • According to a study conducted by U.N. Women agency and Promundo, two-thirds of Middle Eastern Men think women belong at home.
    • Two-thirds to three-quarters of the men surveyed believe a woman's primary role should be caring for the household.
    • Women in the Middle East face a significant level of domestic violence and sexual harassment. Thus, they are not allowed to work and have an opportunity to explore their hobbies.

    INTERNET USERS



    RESEARCH STRATEGY:

    Strategy #1:

    We started off our search by looking at the Reports and Studies in sources such as Pew Research, Nielsen Data Research, and Research Report presented by PWC on the Middle Eastern Region specific to behavior of Women who are above age 40 years. The sources enumerated the information for Middle East consumers, but there was no separate information available for men and women nor was any age specific information available for women.

    Next, we looked through media articles and news in sources such as globalcitizen.org, gulfnews.com and carnegiecouncil.org. The objective was to check any information on women behavior across all age groups with specific focus on age above 40. But the sources showed that women in the Middle East are better educated than ever before, but legal and social barriers are hampering their access to jobs and careers. The employment outlook for women in the Middle East differs dramatically and thus they don’t have any desire to study and pursue higher level of education.

    Strategy #2:

    As there was no precompiled information available, we opted to go the triangulation route. We scoured for the information through social media groups and forums on the advertiser’s perspective on how do they target their customers and whether they have any profile of the target customers. So the same information can be triangulated for women over 40 in the Middle East. We looked through sources such as istizada.com, adweek.com and mediavataarme.com. The sources mentioned that Facebook has removed multiple pages, groups and accounts in the Middle East but there was no mention of the online and social media behaviors of the gender wise information in the Middle East region.

    Strategy #3:

    We subsequently broaden the search by expanding the age and looked for any information available for 25+ age category or 30-50 age category so the same information can be used as a proxy for the women above 40 in sources such as Middle East specific Reports like carnegiecouncil.org, hbr.org and zdnet.com. The sources mentioned the behavior of Middle East consumers towards social media and online shopping but not specific to women over 25 years of age. Thus, this strategy proved futile.

    We also looked at the Global and Asian surveys which might have a section covering the Middle East Region or have any information regarding online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, demographic data etc. in sources such as arabiangazette.com, ResearchGate and Weforum.org. but the reports mentioned the trends in social media usage across the Middle East and North Africa with no focus on women across this region.
    Part
    14
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    Part
    14

    Sub-Group Demographics -the Middle East 2

    The silent generation or the traditionalists are least likely to engage with social media and digital technologies. Approximately 83% of elders aged 65 and above in the Middle East consider themselves religious person.

    HELPFUL FINDINGS

    EDUCATION

    • 32% of Males in the silent generation aged 72 and older are graduates, 22% have some college degree, 30% have a high school diploma, 8% are educated lower than the 9th grade.
    • 22% of Females in the silent generation aged 72 and older are graduates, 23% have some college degree, 38% have a high school diploma, 8% are educated lower than the 9th grade.

    ATTITUDE TOWARDS WORK

    • According to a survey by FlexJobs, 65% of older workers say the primary reasons they work is to pay for necessities.
    • In the same survey, 56% said they enjoy working, 53% want to save for retirement, 44% want to pay off their debt and 44% wants to travel.
    • 71% of older workers would be more loyal to an employer if they had flexible work options.
    • 14% of older workers identified with the computer & IT field, 13% medical & health as relevant career categories, and 21% may take up working in the education category.

    ONLINE/SOCIAL MEDIA BEHAVIORS

    • The silent generation or the traditionalists are least likely to engage with social media and digital technologies.
    • 46% of the silent generation believe that the internet has had a positive impact on their social lives.

    DEMOGRAPHIC DATA

    • Estimated population of the Middle East as of 2019 is 258,356,867.
    • Internet penetration rate among the population in the Middle East is estimated at 67.2%.

    VALUES AND BELIEFS

    • The Tunisian government plan to make inheritance and marriage rules fairer to women unnerves Muslim traditionalists.
    • According to a study, the young population of the Middle East is less likely to be identified as religious compared to the elders.
    • Approximately 83% of elders aged 65 and above in the Middle East consider themselves as a “religious person.”

    SHOPPING BEHAVIORS

    • Brands should target the silent generation or the traditionalists with innovation that can add convenience to their lives.
    • The impact of the smart & connected mega-trend on purchasing decisions among the silent generation in 2018 influenced 10% food, 11% non-alcoholic drinks, 8% alcoholic drinks, 12% personal care and 18% household care.

    HOBBIES

    • Men in the Middle East like to spend time at clubs, coffee houses, sporting events; including soccer, chess, backgammon, cards, and smoking.
    • Women in the Middle East tend to spend time dancing and gossiping with other women.

    RESEARCH STRATEGY

    Owning to the lack of publicly available data for the region, your research team was unable to provide insights on traditionalists in the Middle East. We have provided insights on traditionalists in general based on their online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, and demographic data (income, location, employment, and/or level of education), values and beliefs, attitude towards work and their hobbies.

    We began by looking for pre-compiled data on insights on traditionalists in the Middle East i.e. their online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, and demographic data, values and beliefs, attitude towards work, and their hobbies through industry report sites Forbes, PwC, Nielsen, Inc, Research Gate, GlobalData, among others. The idea was to locate any study/survey conducted on the demographics and psychographics of the traditionalists in the Middle East but all data available for country-focused and region-wise compilation was not available. We also scoured through industry serve and databases like Pew Research, Statista, World Atlas, World Population Review. Unfortunately, these also provided country-wise information or had combined information on the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Hence, this strategy failed to yield any fruitful results.

    Next, we moved tried to triangulate the data. For this, we tried to identify the insights on traditionalists in the world and the share of Middle Eastern traditionalists among them. We found multiple data points and insights focused on America and/or globally but the share of Middle Eastern traditionalists among them was not available to identify the statistics/insights for the region only. This strategy also failed to yield any result.
    Then, we tried to identify the answer by looking for alternate data points, for this we scoured the data for the Middle East region by age i.e. for people born before 1945. The idea here was to identify the information by age and classify their behaviors similar to the traditionalists. We found multiple insights but again the age was not mentioned which made it difficult to ascertain for the traditionalists alone.

    We expanded the research in alignment with the industry jargon mentioned in the research criteria and looked for information for conservatives and/or baby boomers, older gen Xers (over 50 years old) those tend to be traditionalists. We used the similar search path as mentioned above for these generations and age groups but again failed to provide any insights for traditionalists in the Middle East as most data available is by country and not by the region. Hence, this strategy also proved futile.
    Part
    15
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    Part
    15

    Sub-Group Demographics -the Middle East 3

    Foreigners in the Middle East tend to use WhatsApp and Facebook more, compared to other social media sites. Additionally, 46% of these foreigners believe that they are earning more while working in the Middle East, in comparison to working in their home country. However, insights about high-income foreigners in the Middle East is not available in the public domain. This is attributed to the fact that there is little to no information specific to high-income earning foreigners living in the Middle East.

    Relevant insights on foreigners/Residents in the Middle East

    Demographics:

    • As of 2016, 54 million international immigrants are living in the Middle East, with no further segmentation on income level.
    • 48.1% of the Middle Eastern population is international immigrants.
    • Foreigners in the Middle East are from diversified ethnic groups such as Filipinos, Jews, Hindus, Bengalis, Egyptians, Greeks, Sri Lankans, Sikhs, and Pakistanis.
    • The major religions of Middle Eastern foreigners are Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
    • The majority of international immigrants in the Middle East are males.
    • Online/social media behaviors:
    • The internet penetration in the Middle Eastern region is high (67.2%) when compared to the rest of the world (56.5%).
    • The percentage of social media use in the Middle East is as follows: Whatsapp (75%), Facebook (71%), Instagram (42%), YouTube (59%), Snapchat (31%), and Twitter (28%). However, no data can be found that is specific to the social media use of high-income foreigners in the Middle East.

    Shopping behaviors:

    • Around 55% of Middle Eastern shoppers are more focused on savings while shopping.
    • 35% of Middle Eastern shoppers are opting for preferred brands over cheap brands.
    • 54% of Middle Eastern shoppers do not show any brand loyalty.

    Values and beliefs:

    • 46% of foreigners in the Middle East believe that they are earning more than they would in their respective home countries.

    Work Attitude:

    • 22% of foreigners claim that they save nothing from their monthly salary whereas 27% of them save less than 5% of their salary. Furthermore, 20% of foreigners save 21% to 30% of monthly salary.

    Hobbies:

    Research Strategy

    Information on insights on high-income foreigners in the Middle East is not available in the public domain. There is limited information specific to foreigners in the Middle East to triangulate insights about high-income foreigners in the Middle East.

    Initially, the research team searched for information about the insights of high-income foreigners in the Middle East-related to their online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, demographic data, values and beliefs, attitude towards work, and their hobbies. The team leveraged foreigner surveys, reports, and expat forums. These sources include PRI.org, expat forums, Pew Research, the International Labour Organization, ILO, Statista, and others. Most of the information found from the given sources was specific to the natives of the Middle East and foreigners in general. No information could be found specific to high-income foreigners in the Middle East.

    The research team then decided to take a different approach and searched for reports about the online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, demographic data, values and beliefs, attitude towards work, and hobbies of the residents of the Middle East. This search was meant to garner any segmented information on foreigners based on which the team can further extrapolate to high-income foreigners in the Middle East. The research team looked into various Middle Eastern statistical reports and articles such as Gulfnews, Decorum, Go-Gulf, Annahar, and others. However, specific segmentation on foreigners in Middle east could not be found, as most of the information is based on the countries within the Middle East and not Middle east as a whole.

    The research team then decided to look for information for the big employers of foreigners in the Middle East. The team idealized that by capturing company reports on different publications about employee lifestyle and behavior, some insights can then be found on high-income foreigners in the Middle East. The team leveraged websites such as Cadogantate, GulfTalent, Expacare, Bayt, Hays, NADIA, and others. However, most of the recruiting agencies are listed by countries and not as a whole.
    Part
    16
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    Part
    16

    Sub-Group Demographics -the Middle East 4

    Insights on tech-savvy adults with high income in the Middle East include their desire to stay connected, support sustainability, their proficiency at becoming leaders, maintaining brand loyalty, developing business ideas, focusing on their social life, and building their own businesses.

    USING THE INTERNET/SOCIAL MEDIA TO INVEST/STAY CONNECTED

    • Fintech solutions, as well as robo-advisors, are attractive to tech-savvy Millennials that are high-income earners because of the level of convenience they provide.
    • However, when they become uncertain about investments, they'd rather make their own decisions instead of using fintech solutions or robo-advisors.
    • They are more inclined to get their information online through apps, social media (e.g. YouTube, WhatsApp, Facebook), as well as webinars.
    • The growth in terms of watch time for Millennial entrepreneurs (including tech-savvy Millennials that are high-income earners) in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has a 60% increase year-on-year and for mobile watch time, a 90% increase year-on-year.
    • In MENA, 97% of Millennials use the internet, 94% have one or more social media account(s), 54% always try to use technology, and 51% are always online.
    • These figures provide an estimate that the majority of the MENA Millennials are tech-savvy and tend to use technologies or browse the internet.
    • The tech-savvy Millennials with high income in the Middle East focus on technologies for "basic savings products, equities, and property," as well as investments.

    MAINTAINING LOYALTY TO ONE BRAND

    • They are more interested in deals that are flexible, 35% like to stay updated with their brands and 64% like to see better deals.
    • Millennial entrepreneurs tend to be more loyal to one brand when shopping.
    • Middle Eastern Millennials spend a lot while traveling (twice that of Europe) and the most globally.
    • Their purchase decisions (64%) are influenced by branded videos on social media.
    • In the case of purchasing real estate (e.g. house), Millennials pay close attention to customer reviews, and research using smartphones, social media, and other online networks.
    • 43% of Millennials use food delivery apps, 40% use ride-hailing apps, and 20% use wearables.
    • Ecommerce shopping is done through websites (43%), in the store (43%), social media (27%), and mobile apps (24%).
    • Middle Eastern Millennials tend to keep tabs on brands for better deals while also using social media to help them make decisions about purchasing.
    • Since the majority of tech-savvy Millennials with a high income in the Middle East are also estimated to be active on social media, they may also be staying updates with brands or using social media to make purchasing decisions.

    DEVELOPING BUSINESS IDEAS

    SUPPORTING SUSTAINABILITY

    BUILDING THEIR OWN BUSINESSES

    • Tech-savvy Millennials with high income are appreciative of hard work.
    • This helps them to be seen as "top entrepreneurs amongst their peers globally."
    • Success is seen as a result of their hard work and is not taken for granted by the tech-savvy Millennials with high income.
    • They (Millennial entrepreneurs) tend to work 2.5 hours more than Millennials globally, amounting to 12.5 hours daily.
    • 63% have access to working in family businesses but only 23% actually do so as shareholders or executives.
    • They have a preference to build their own companies rather than to take up a post in their family's business.
    • This suggests that tech-savvy Millennials with high income prefer to see the fruits of their own labor rather than to accept those already provided or available through their family's business.

    FOCUSING ON SOCIAL LIFE

    • Millennials in the Middle East enjoy traveling and spending a lot while doing so.
    • They spend a lot of time on social media.
    • They also like to exercise and use apps to help them keep track of their progress (36%).
    • Other hobbies include volunteering, dining out, outdoor activities, and spending time with family and friends.
    • Given that most MENA Millennials are tech-savvy and tend to use technologies, this may be one of their hobbies as well.
    • Middle Eastern Millennials spend the most when traveling so it also suggests that those that are digitally savvy and can easily book their flights and are more likely to be able to afford this, may also like traveling.

    BECOMING LEADERS

    • Female Millennials who are also tech-savvy and earning high incomes are now increasingly assuming leadership roles and effecting changes in the Middle East.
    • Arab Millennials are increasingly becoming more interested in and taking leadership roles and responsibilities.
    • They believe the private sector has the strongest influence on society while non-governmental organizations have the least influence.
    • 53% believe in stability over democracy and 67% believe Arab leaders should focus more on improving citizens' privacy rights.
    • These figures suggest that MENA Millennials are more interested in becoming leaders that make a difference for the citizens.
    • This is also an attraction and purpose for the female Millennials who are also tech-savvy and earning high incomes, becoming leaders.


    RESEARCH STRATEGY

    Our initial searches for insights on tech-savvy adults with a high income in the Middle East showed that tech-savvy Millennials have higher-paying, tax-free jobs, accumulating a bigger share of their family's wealth. They are "top entrepreneurs amongst their peers globally," using fintech solutions and robo-advisors. Since we could find no statistics to qualify these findings, we continued our research.

    We were able to identify several sources that provided statistics about Millennials in the Middle East and North Africa. There were statistics relating to mobile watch time, internet use including social media, brand loyalty when shopping, hobbies such as traveling, the age they become entrepreneurs, their perspective on leadership, and more. However, there were no statistics that spoke directly to the sub-group that are both tech-savvy and high-income earners.

    To provide insights on this sub-group which seemingly has limited information pre-compiled about them, we combined the information gathered from the sources specific to the sub-group and those for the general MENA Millennial population which had information about online/social media behaviors, shopping behaviors, any demographic data, values and beliefs, attitude towards work, and their hobbies.

    We then used the information collected to conduct triangulations where applicable and provided a synthesized view of tech-savvy adults with high income in the Middle East. However, this is not a full representation of the sub-group in its entirety.
    Sources
    Sources

    From Part 02
    Quotes
    • "The research—commissioned by Snapchat in partnership with business intelligence firm Cassandra—comes at a time when millennials (those aged 18-34 years old) have more than $3 trillion of disposable income globally, with their spending power predicted to grow to 33% of all consumer spending over the next decade. Around 27% of the Saudi population are millennials."
    Quotes
    • "Positive economic sentiment among millennials is at its lowest in the six years of the report, with only 26 per cent of respondents saying they expect the economic situations in their countries to improve in the coming year. That figure has never been lower than 40 per cent and stood at 45 per cent in the past two years. In comparison, 45 per cent of Saudi millennials think the economic situation will progress"
    Quotes
    • "This statistic depicts the results of a survey on the average online shopping spending of Millennials in Saudi Arabia during the last time they shopped online, by category, as of 2015. During the survey period, Millennials in Saudi Arabia spent an average of 744 U.S. dollars on business travel during the last time they shopped online."
    Quotes
    • "It may be of no surprise that the majority of YouTube viewers in the Middle East are youth, some of the most tech-savvy and digital consumers in the world. 80 percent of Saudi millennials visit YouTube once a day, according to a recent report by YouTube revealing that Saudi Arabia ranked among the top countries in terms of watchtime per capita."
    From Part 06
    Quotes
    • "Manama in Bahrain has been rated the best city in the world to emigrate to, in a newly published global survey. The city scored particularly highly in the survey’s “getting settled index”, with respondents saying they found it easy to get by without speaking Arabic and make new friends, and a welcoming attitude among local people to foreign residents. Expats in Bahrain also reported higher earnings than the worldwide average, with twice as many (11 per cent) reporting an annual household income of over $200,000 (€170,000)."
    • "I soon realised most expats were in the same boat as me and were eager to meet new people and forge friendships."
    Quotes
    • "Most expats working in Bahrain have either been recruited outside the country, normally by a headhunter or via an agency, or have been transferred by their company. Nearly all expatriates working in Bahrain are on a fixed-term contract. "
    Quotes
    • "Many respondents in Bahrain give overall job satisfaction the best possible rating, pushing the Gulf State to the top of the Working Abroad Index. "
    • " Over four in five respondents generally agree that it is not difficult to get used to the local culture (81%), feel at home in it (84%), and to settle down in Bahrain (81%). In the words of one Indian expat in Bahrain: “The people here are very friendly, and everyone can adjust easily.” The friendly attitude towards foreign residents, 91% rate this factor positively! "
    Quotes
    • "Thanks to Bahrain's many islands, water sports are very popular with expats and locals, including fishing, sailing and boating, and scuba diving. "
    Quotes
    • "Rated the best country for expats in 2018, Bahrain also performs well in the new Digital Life subcategory (12th out of 68 countries). It receives its best rating with regard to the availability of administrative or government online services (7th out of 68), with 84% of expats rating this positively and to pay without cash in Bahrain. For unrestricted access to online services (e.g. social media): 80% of respondents say they are happy."
    From Part 08
    Quotes
    • "Saudi Arabia’s most conservative Islamists are reeling from a loss of influence that has left them confused about their place in a country where they once wielded much clout. Long a swaggering force, these conservatives now tiptoe on social media outlets like Twitter. In mosques and at community gatherings, they reluctantly criticize recent changes they stridently oppose, such as the easing of social boundaries between men and women."
    • "The architect of their turmoil is Mohammed bin Salman, Saudi Arabia’s young and hard-charging crown prince. His vows to modernize the country have included curbing the influence of the conservatives, who adhere to a strict form of Islam they say is modeled on the way it was practiced during the time of the prophet Muhammad in the 7th century and the generations that immediately followed. Speaking after a recent evening gathering of like-minded Saudis at a relative’s home, he fretted that he and his fellows were condemned to become like the Amish in the United States, sequestered from a permissive society because of their strict views. “It’s like we’re becoming strangers.”"
    Quotes
    • "Traditionally, Saudi women’s lives have centered on their chores and household affairs, whereas Saudi men have been the breadwinners. The last few years have witnessed the emergence of Saudi women who are entering paid employment and consequently facing challenges related to the existing traditional, cultural and religious values. "
    Quotes
    • "Omar's routine is a gentle dig at the religious establishment. Much of what was forbidden in Saudi Arabia — cinema, music, theater, women driving — is suddenly acceptable. In fact, the Saudi government is encouraging it. But for many Saudis, their whole way of life — their whole belief system — is being upended."
    Quotes
    • "The people of the Arabian Peninsula have enjoyed sports for thousands of years, including horse and camel racing, falconry and hunting with hounds."
    Quotes
    • "The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has a very strong mall culture. Malls in the conservative kingdom serve as climatic sanctuaries for its residents and visitors – somewhere to seek shelter, food, and drink from the severe extremities of the outside weather. Every mall has its own set of rules which apply to all visitors in addition to the rules and laws of the conservative country."
    Quotes
    • "The Saudi government’s censorship apparatus relies on a black list of URLs and the aforementioned software that filters for content by topic. Saudi Arabia, has been known to use the American-owned SmartFilter, which contains over 90 categories to be used for blocking. Examples of these categories are: provocative attire, general news, dating/ social, history, drugs."
    • "Despite Saudi government’s censorship efforts appearing rather transparent, issues with controlling larger platforms such as YouTube and Twitter have led the government to rely on clandestine efforts to control the Internet. "
    Quotes
    • "Saudi Arabia will continue to wrestle with the heavy legacies of its past – balancing the requirements of progress, modernisation and a diminishing rentier economy with the demands of its conservative support base (estimated to be 23 percent of the national population). "
    Quotes
    • "Saudi Arabia’s malls may be filled with many of the same shops found in their Western counterparts, but the country’s most unique shopping experiences are found in Saudi Arabia’s souqs. These traditional outdoor markets are the best places in the country to find handmade Saudi souvenirs like ornately decorated swords and daggers, incense and holders, and jewelry. Many Souq al-Thumairi vendors speak English, and haggling, like at all other Saudi souqs, is mandatory."
    From Part 13
    Quotes
    • "The region also has the lowest proportion of women entrepreneurs, according to an OECD report which examines barriers to their employment in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia"
    Quotes
    • "While many governments focus on job-creation schemes, young women are often at a particular disadvantage, as such schemes rarely take into account gender diversity when structuring incentives for investment or industry growth. "
    • "More closely aligning education with labor market needs, and encouraging young women to study growing fields, could reduce the impact of this skills gap."
    From Part 15
    Quotes
    • "The Middle East has many different ethnic groups sprawled across its countries, including Arabs, Bengalis, Egyptians, Filipinos, Jews, Hindus, Greeks, Sri Lankans, Sikhs and Pakistanis, just to name a few."
    • " Many major religions originated in this region, and those religions include Christianity, Judaism and Islam, among other religious beliefs that have been formed there. Islam is the most practiced religion across the region, although this can vary by country. Lebanon, for example, has over 40% of people that follow Christianity."
    Quotes
    • "Favorite male pastimes in the Middle East include soccer, chess, backgammon, cards, and smoking nargilla (a large, often-communal, pipe). Though most females in the Middle East tend to spend their evenings at home or in a supervised dorm, when women do congregate, the conversation is lively with gossip and outburst of dance and laughter. "
    • "Also know that few women exercise, let alone play competitive sports. Although this trend is changing and some females now frequent sports gyms, the change is occurring slowly and isn't appreciated by everyone."