Specialty Soy and Grains Market

Part
01
of eleven
Part
01

IP Soybeans and Specialty Grains: Market Size

In recent years, there has been a sudden increase and interest in the production of identity preserved (IP) soybean and specialty grains, which is reflected in the increasing global market share of these foods. This research intends to determine the global market size of IP soybeans and specialty grains and look into the estimated growth of the market in the coming years. The estimated market size as of 2017 for the global IP soybean market is $29 billion.

(IP) Soybean Global Market

  • In 2017, the global production of all soybean (GMO and non-GMO IP) varieties was 341.608 million metric tons.
  • In 2017, the total market size of all soybean (GMO and non-GMO IP) varieties was valued at $146.23 billion, resulting in an estimated price per metric ton of $428.06. ($146.23B/341,608,000=$428.06)
  • By 2025, the total market size of all soybean (GMO and non-GMO IP) varieties is projected to be $215.75 billion, a CAGR of 5% between 2018 and 2025.
  • In 2017, the most recent year available, the global production of only non-GMO IP soybean variety was 67.69 million metric tons. The resulting market size as of 2017 is estimated at $29 billion. ($428.06 x 67,690,000)
  • By 2025, the global production of only non-GMO IP soybean variety is projected to grow to 126.06 million metric tons, a CAGR of 8.10% between 2018 and 2025.

Specialty Grain Global Market

BY SOURCE

  • On the basis of source, the specialty grain market is sub-segmented into barley, wheat, and rye.
  • By source, barley accounted for the maximum share in 2018, due to its characteristic flavor.
  • However, the rye segment is projected to show the fastest growth by 2026, registering a CAGR of 5.9%.

BY FORM

  • On the basis of form, the specialty grain market is sub-segmented into dry and liquid types.
  • By form, dry type accounted for more than half of the specialty grain market share in 2018, due to its higher shelf life. It is expected to retain its market dominance up to 2026.
  • However, the liquid type is projected to show the fastest growth by 2026, registering a CAGR of 5.3%.

BY APPLICATION

  • On the basis of application, the specialty grain market is sub-segmented into dairy and frozen products, alcoholic beverages, non-alcoholic beverages, bakery and confectionery, and others.
  • By application, alcoholic beverages held the highest specialty grain market share in 2018, due to its worldwide popularity and demand. It is expected to retain its market dominance up to 2026.
  • However, the dairy and frozen products segment is projected to show the fastest growth by 2026, registering a CAGR of 5.6%.

BY PRODUCT

  • On the basis of application, the specialty grain market is sub-segmented into caramelized malt and roasted malt, among others.
  • By product type, caramelized malt held the highest specialty grain market share in 2018. It is expected to retain its market dominance up to 2026.
  • However, the others segment is projected to show the fastest growth by 2026, registering a CAGR of 4.9%.

BY REGION

  • On the basis of region, the specialty grain market has been classified into North America (USA, Canada, and Mexico), Europe (UK, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Rest of Europe), Asia-Pacific (China, India, Japan, South Korea, Australia, Rest of Asia-Pacific), and LAMEA (Brazil, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Rest of LAMEA).
  • By region, Europe and North America accounted for the maximum share in the specialty grain market share in 2018, owing to the popularity of malt-based products like beer and malted milk in these markets.
  • Europe is the largest market and is projected to grow at a CAGR of 4.2% during 2019-2026.
  • However, Asia-Pacific is the fastest growing market and is expected to show the highest CAGR growth during 2019-2026 owing to the rise in popularity of malt-based health drinks like Horlicks and Milo.



Part
02
of eleven
Part
02

IP Soybeans and Specialty Grains: Consumer Trends

    IP soybeans and specialty grains are sold at a premium in their markets because of their unique quality and the specific guidelines used for their production. IP soybeans and specialty grains are desirable for their superior sourcing, traceability, and purity and are often used to create high quality soy and other food products for human consumption. Relevant consumer trends in this market include the rising popularity of vegan and vegetarian diets, a growing desire for traceability and transparency in food systems, and increasing popularity and awareness of non-GMO foods.

Vegan and Vegetarian Diets

  • Vegan and vegetarian diets are increasing in popularity, particularly in some developed countries such as the UK and the US. The number of vegans in the UK increased from 150,000 in 2006 to 600,000 in 2018. In the US the number of consumers who identified as vegan grew from 1% to 6% from2014 to 2017. These diets are especially popular among younger consumers with 25% of Americans age 25-34 identifying as vegan or vegetarian.
  • In both the UK and the US the rise in vegan and vegetarian diets has been attributed to three key motivations: personal health, animal welfare, and environmental sustainability.
  • This increase in vegan and vegetarian diets has contributed to a global increase in demand for tofu and other soy-based food products made from IP soybeans which are commonly used as meat and dairy substitutes. This increase in demand is also attributed to growing global population and increasing health consciousness among consumers.
  • Vitasoy is a Chinese company that produces soy food products such as soy milk and tofu that are sold around the world. Vitasoy is a leader of the soy foods industry, with a revenue of $968 million in 2019. Vitasoy appeals to the vegan and vegetarian consumer trend by creating plant-based food products with a focus on nutrition and sustainability. While Vitasoy specifies that it uses only non-GMO soybeans, it does not specify whether these are IP soybeans.
  • A smaller company at the forefront of this trend is Phoenix Bean, "a premier supplier of tofu to the Chicagoland area for more than 30 years." While Phoenix Bean is a relatively small company, it appeals heavily to the vegan and vegetarian trend both because it is small and local and because it focuses on sustainability and nutrition by using only locally sourced, non-GMO, IP soybeans.

Traceability, Sustainability, and Transparency

  • The reign of processed food in the US has passed its peak, and has been replaced by growing interest in the Farm-to-Table food movement. Growth in this movement has led to increased patronization of farmer's markets and locally sourced food retailers and restaurants, as well as growing interest and concern with supply chain sustainability and transparency within food systems.
  • On a more global scale, international companies such as Tyson and the global food and beverage research firm Innova Market Insights both identified increased consumer demand for traceability and transparency in food production as a main consumer trend in 2019.
  • The growing demand for traceability and transparency in food production is especially relevant to soybean producers and producers of IP specialty grains who are encountering increased interest in the traceability provided by the IP system.
  • Soy Canada is a national association that represents members of the Canadian soybean industry from farm to marketplace. Soy Canada has become one of the largest exporters of IP soybeans in part because Canada has one of the best IP soybean systems in the world provided by the Canadian Identity Preserved Recognition System (CIPRS). The CIPRS upholds high quality standards, and provides the ability to trace the soybean back to the farm from which it came.

Increasing Demand for Non-GMO Foods

  • The Non-GMO Project has reported that 50% of consumers surveyed in North America reported that they try to avoid GMOs in their food, and that 92% of American consumers and 88% of Canadian consumers support labeling of products that contain GMOs.
  • In 2016 annual sales of Non-GMO Project Verified products reached $26 billion, and the global market for non-GMO foods is predicted to grow another 16.23% from 2017-2021.
  • The consumer trend towards non-GMO products is driven by environmental and human health concerns related to the use of pesticides and herbicides, and the perception of non-GMO foods as generally healthier and safer than their GMO counterparts.
  • IP soybeans and specialty grains are particularly suited to fit this consumer trend since IP system standards use guidelines for sourcing, growing, and harvesting that prevent contamination between GMO and non-GMO crops.
  • Denofa is a specifically non-GMO soy crushing company located in Norway that makes soybean meal, soybean oil, and lecithin for both food and feed ingredients. Strict laws in Norway state that only non-GMO soybeans can be imported into the country, and because of this Denofa uses only raw materials and soybeans that have been sourced through IP programs and will not be contaminated by GMO products.

Research Strategy

General information on the unique properties and advantages of IP soybeans and specialty grains was used to identify possible consumer trends that would impact this market, such as trends in soy food product consumption and attitudes towards GMO vs non-GMO foods. Reliable news and data sources were identified and combed to find more detailed data on each trend and to identify the driving factors behind each one. Once the trend was identified relevant websites for companies with a particular focus on the market and motivations identified in each trend were searched to provide information about how companies are responding to these trends, and how IP soybeans and specialty grains in particular are being used to adapt to these trends.
Part
03
of eleven
Part
03

IP Soybeans and Specialty Grains: Technology Trends

Biofortification and Genome Editing are two technology trends having great impact on businesses involved in the identity preservation soybeans and specialty grains markets.

Biofortification

  • Harvesting crops with higher amounts of particular micronutrient than standard crops is biofortification.
  • Biofortification increases nutrient levels during plant growth.
  • Biofortification helps meet the demand for naturally nutritious grains in India.
  • Biofortification is considered a cost-efficient and sustainable way to address micronutrient deficiencies, especially in countries such as Nigeria.
  • Genetic biofortification can help develop iron-enriched grains as a way to address "hidden hunger," the cause of inadequate consumption of necessary micronutrients.
  • Hidden hunger affects around 2 billion people worldwide and 30-40% of it is the result of iron-poor diets.
  • Leading companies in biofortification include Syngenta, HarvestPlus, and Bayer among others.
  • In 2018, the biofortification market was $100.48 million and is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 7.32% to reach $153.53 million by 2024.

Genome Editing

  • Genome editing is a type of genetic modification and the most promising technique of the new breeding technologies (NBT) aimed at addressing the agricultural challenges of extreme climate events, decreased soil fertility, and increasing resistance of plant pests.
  • Genome editing provides advanced biotechnological techniques for the precise and efficient targeting of desirable modification of an organism’s genome.
  • One genome editing technique being employed is CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), a method allowing scientists to change the plant genome and add a desirable trait or functionality.
  • A genome is the complete set of DNA in an organism.
  • Yield10, a leader in genome editing technology, is headquartered in Woburn, MA and has additional agricultural facility with greenhouses in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
  • Yield10 has many traits in development planned for testing alone and in combination with an eye toward improving traits for commercialization.

Research Strategy

A search for businesses using leading technology in the IP soybeans and specialty grains market was undertaken and led to the two trends of biofortification and genome editing. These two trends were chosen for how well they highlight approaches in meeting the growing need for nutrient-rich foods in a world of over 7.5 billion people.


Part
04
of eleven
Part
04

IP Soybeans and Specialty Grains: Producers

Five top producers in the IP soybeans and specialty grains market include Clarkson Grain Company Inc., who engages in producing IP soy and corn food ingredients and has an annual revenue of $40.5 million. Other producers include SB&B Foods Inc., Brushvale Seed, Inc., Soyko International, and Richland IFC, Inc. Full details of the companies are available within the attached spreadsheet.

Clarkson Grain Company Inc.

  • Clarkson Grain Company is a leader in Identity-Preserved non-GMO and organic corn and soy food ingredients.
  • Their unique niche product focus and supply chain management start with fostering relationships with its farmer partners to produce high-quality, consistent specialty soybeans and corns.
  • It is an agricultural producer that specializes in growing, storage and processing of Identity-Preserved, non-GMO and organic corn, soybeans and soy ingredients.
  • Top players were determined by registered members of the Specialty Soya Grains Alliance (SSGA), a national alliance of companies focused on production, processing, and shipping of specialty soya and grains worldwide.
  • According to ZoomInfo, Clarkson's annual revenue stands at $40.5 million as of the fourth quarter of 2019. It has about 165 employees.
  • They produce specialty corn such as identity-preserved white corn — traceable to American farms (both non-GMO & organic). They also produce specialty soy such as identity-preserved soybeans, that are non-GMO and organic.
  • According to its LinkedIn page, some of Clarkson Grain Co Inc. customers are producers of Non-GMO and Organic meat, milk and eggs. Also, they have customers who deal in tortillas, tortilla chips, soy milk, tofu, and miso soup, and similar products.

SB&B Foods Inc.

Brushvale Seed, Inc.

Soyko International

Richland IFC, Inc.




Part
05
of eleven
Part
05

IP Soybeans and Specialty Grains: Processors

Clarkson Grain company, Sunrise Foods International, Grain Place Foods, Rivara S.A and Blue Grass Farms of Ohio are among the top processors in the IP soybeans and specialty grains market. They are all classified as non-GMO project verified companies and details of each can be found in the attached spreadsheet.

Clarkson Grain Company

Sunrise Foods International

  • Sunrise's website address is https://sunrisefoods.ca/
  • The company is based at Saskatchewan, Canada and have modern laboratories to ensure they deliver quality to their customers. They get produce from a wide range of sources and they have customers from across the globe. Though they do both conventional and organic products, they have organic certification and offer services specific to each customer's needs.
  • Sunrise Foods revenue is estimated at $13 million.
  • Their customers are both Canadian and international firms dealing in both conventional and in IP soybean products such as soybean oil and soybean hull pellets.
  • Reports indicate that the company has about 114 employees.
  • Their products include IP soy oil, soy meal, soy hull pellets and soy beans.

Blue Grass Farms of Ohio

  • Blue Grass Farms of Ohio website address is http://bluegrassfarmsohio.com/

Gain Place Foods

Rivara S.A.


Research Strategy

For this request, we first searched for lists/mentions of lading companies operating within the IP soybeans and specialty grains market globally. We scanned through industry-related reports and articles to find relevant information. Upon gathering some names of players within the industry, we then explored company databases, such as ZoomInfo, Owler, and Hoovers, to locate their annual revenues as many of them did not have publicly available annual reports.

Part
06
of eleven
Part
06

IP Soybeans and Specialty Grains: Shippers

Some of the top shippers in the IP soybeans and specialty grains market include Professional Export Services, Ray-Mont Logistics, Scoular, Double River Forwarding and GlobeRunners Inc. The findings are provided in the attached spreadsheet.

Selected Findings

Research Strategy

In order to identify the top shippers in the IP soybeans and specialty grains market, we searched the public domain and were able to come across the Specialty Soya Grains Alliance (SSGA), an alliance of companies focused on production, processing, and shipping of specialty soy and grains worldwide. We identified the members involved in shipping and chose them as our top companies.
Part
07
of eleven
Part
07

IP Soybeans and Specialty Grains: PRODUCERS, Part 2

All the requested information about Clarkson Grain Company, SB&B Foods, Brushvale Seed, SOYKO International, and Richland IFC is included in the attached spreadsheet. Additionally, a summary of our findings is provided below.

IP Soybean & Specialty Grain Producers

  • Clarkson Grain Company has eight employees.
  • SB&B Foods has seven employees.
  • Brushvale Seed has four employees.
  • SOYKO International has 17 employees.
  • Richland IFC has approximately 20 employees.

Research Strategy

We looked for, but were unable to find, specific names of customers for any of the producers. In looking for that information, we reviewed the companies' websites, social media pages, and checked for any articles that might have mentioned such. However, none of those strategies yielded any information about customer names for any of the producers. Thus, we provided the types of customers each company serves, which we determined through the information on their websites. We found the types of products that each producer provides through the information about that posted on their websites. The employee counts we provided came from the staff pages on the companies' websites, Linkedin, and Bloomberg.
Part
08
of eleven
Part
08

IP Soybeans and Specialty Grains: Processors, Part 2

Five companies that are among the top processors of IP soybean and specialty grain include the Clarkson Grain Company, Sunrise Foods International, Blue Grass Farms, Grain Place Foods, and Rivara S.A. Below is a business overview of each of these companies. The requested information is also available in the attached spreadsheet.

Clarkson Grain Company

  • The company, founded in 1974, is based in Cerro Gordo, Illinois, and is owned by the Clarkson family. The Clarkson Grain Company concentrates on growing, storing, and processing Identity-Preserved, non-GMO (genetically modified organisms) organic certified transitional corn, soybean, and soybean products, while offering unique corn hybrids.
  • The company strictly follows up its farmers and gives them the support they need to ensure they are keeping up with standards, while operating its storage, cleaning, handling, and processing facility. Also, it maintains its processing systems in such a way that the quality of products they receive from their farmer partners is sustained.
  • The Clarkson Grain Company has an estimated annual revenue of $40.5 million.
  • Its customers include food manufacturers, animal feed companies, cosmetics companies, and nutritional supplement companies.
  • The Clarkson Grain Company has between 51-200 employees.
  • The Clarkson Grain Company offers high-protein light or dark-hilum IP soybeans, organic lecithin, non-GMO lecithin, and specialty non-GMO and organic corns.

Sunrise Foods International

  • Sunrise Foods International, founded in 1997, is based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, and has modern laboratories to ensure they deliver quality to their customers. They use both wholly-owned and third-party processing facilities to ensure efficient delivery of clean, sorted, and packaged custom products.
  • They get produce from a wide range of sources and have customers from across the globe. To meet their demands, they have both conventional and organic products. Additionally, they have an organic certification and offer services specific to each customer's needs.
  • Sunrise Foods generates an estimated $13 million annually in revenue.
  • Their customers include agro-food companies, animal feed companies, and consumers.
  • The company has an estimated 144 employees.
  • Their products include certified organic grains and feeds.

Bluegrass Farms

  • The company located in Jeffersonville, Ohio, and was part of the team that initiated the development of mechanisms for independent verification of IP products and was among the first companies to export such products to Japan.
  • It has an ultra-modern processing plant with the capacity to sort grains to attain perfect levels of homogeneity, and the company strictly adheres to IP standards by closely following each step in its operations chain.
  • Blue Grass Farms' revenue is estimated at $5.4 million.
  • Their customers include soy food producers, soy milk producers, and corn food producers.
  • Their products include "certified AOSCA-Identity-Preserved, non-GMO food-grade soybeans, and non-GMO food-grade corn."

Grain Place Foods

  • The company is based in Marquette, Nebraska, and has a history that dates as far back as 1953 when farmer Don Vetter developed an interest in the organic systems of crop productions. It received its organic certification in 1978 and records indicate that most of its staff has worked for the company for over 15 years.
  • Grain Place Foods has an estimated revenue of about $12 million.
  • Grain Place's customers include Whole Foods Market, Lincoln, Open Harvest Natural Foods Co-operative Grocery, and Back Alley Bakery.
  • Grain Place has 60 employees.
  • The company offers all organic and non-GMO grains and rolled grains.

Rivara S.A.

  • Rivara is one of the top processors and suppliers of non-GMO products in Argentina, and the company's revenue amounts to more than $49 million.
  • It supplies millions of liters of IP corn and soy products to the United States each year. It is among the non-GMO verified project companies and products from such companies have a seal that makes them highly trusted by consumers.
  • Its customers include dealers of IP soybean oil and IP soybean whole grain, as well as consumers of soy scones and sandwiches.
  • Rivara had around 120 employees.
  • The company's products include non-GMO soybean, organic soybean oil, animal feed, and specialty grains.
Part
09
of eleven
Part
09

IP Soybeans and Specialty Grains: Shippers, Part 2

While Professional Export Services offers ocean freight, heavy equipment, roll on-roll off and custom shipping projects, Ray-Mont Logistics offers ocean freight forwarding and terminal operations, and Scoular offers risk management services, transportation and logistics, processing, sourcing and transportation of commodities. The business overview for these and other IP soybean and specialty grain shippers have been entered in the attached spreadsheet.

Selected Findings

Part
10
of eleven
Part
10

IP Soybeans and Specialty Grains: SE Asia Importers

Even after extensive research, the major importers of specialty grains in Southeast Asia other than Cargill Vietnam Limited could not be identified. The major importers of IP soybeans in Southeast Asia include BULOG, Cargill Vietnam, and the Thai Feed Mill Association. More information on the topic has been presented below, along with an outline of the research strategy.

Major Importers of IP Soybeans in Southeast Asia

1. Cargill Vietnam Limited.

  • Here is the link to the website of Cargill Vietnam Limited.
  • Cargill Vietnam Limited is a US-established company that was established in Vietnam in 1995. The areas of business that the company covers in Vietnam are food and beverage ingredients (including non-GMO soybeans), animal nutrition, grain and oil seeds, metals, and aqua macro feed ingredients.
  • The company claims to be one of the largest importers of proteins (including soybeans) and specialty grains in Vietnam, based on the increasing volume of its products. They are also the largest domestic supplier of soybeans in Vietnam.

2. BULOG, Indonesia

  • Here is the link to the website of BULOG.
  • BULOG stands for the Bureau of Logistics. It is headquartered in Jakarta, Indonesia.
  • It is a state-owned company that is heavily invested in food logistics. The company is involved in many businesses, including "logistics / warehousing, surveying and eradication of pests, the provision of plastic sacks, transportation businesses, trading of food commodities and retail businesses."
  • BULOG is the largest importer of all types of soybeans and food grains in Indonesia. Since it is the major importer in Indonesia, the Ministry of Agriculture in Indonesia had considered a draft regulation in 2018 to restrict soybean imports in the country by making BULOG the only soybean importer of Indonesia.

3. The Thai Feed Mill Association

  • Here is the link to the website of the Thai Feed Mill Association.
  • The Thai Feed Mill Association is one of the six associations that are allowed to import soybeans by the government of Thailand. The association primarily imports soybeans for preparing healthy meals for livestock, such as pigs, fish, and chicken.
  • The vision of the association is to make the livestock business in Thailand completely sustainable.

Research Strategy

Since IP soybeans and specialty grain products are studied together by the Specialty Soy and Grains Alliance (SSGA), we started the research by looking through its website. We were able to understand the related market from the website. Thereafter, we started searching for information related to the import of IP soybeans and specialty grains in Southeast Asia. An article on US SOY identified Indonesia, Vietnam, and Thailand as the leading importers of identity-preserved (IP) soybeans in Southeast Asia. However, the article did not provide information on the specialty grains market. We researched some more articles on World Grain, Country Guide, SSGA, and more to corroborate the information on the article. After researching the specialty grains industry of Southeast Asia across multiple credible databases, including Nikkei, Research Gate, and SSGA, we were able to understand that there is very little information related to the specialty grains industry of Southeast Asia in the public database. Therefore, we decided to present the major importers of IP soybeans and specialty grains products in Southeast Asia separately.

Since the major importers of IP soybeans in Southeast Asia were Indonesia, Thailand, and Vietnam, we decided to present the major importing companies and associations from these countries for the research. Based on the size of the company and the volume of its import activities, we were able to identify Cargill Vietnam Limited as a major importer of IP soybeans in Southeast Asia. Thereafter, we searched for large importers in Indonesia. We found out that a state-owned company called BULOG is the largest importer and distributor of food items, such as grains and soybeans, in Indonesia. Since it is the largest importer in Indonesia and Indonesia is the largest importer from Southeast Asia, we decided to include BULOG as a major importer. Similarly, since there are only six importing associations in Thailand and Thailand is one of the major importers from Southeast Asia, we decided to use one of the six associations as a major importer. However, five of the six associations that import soybeans into Thailand don't have their own website. Therefore, we decided to include the Thai Feed Mill Association as a major importer. The association had its own website, and we were able to gather more information from it.

BULOG and the Thai Feed Mill Association had not specified if they import IP soybeans on their respective websites. Therefore, we tried searching for more major companies. We searched for the major importers in Singapore, Malaysia, and the Philippines. However, we were only able to find general statistics. We did not find any information related to the specific importers in the countries. We also searched across global reports on Research Gate and USDA; however, those reports only provided information, such as the volume of import activities and the export activities in those countries. We also dug into the articles written on the import activities of Southeast Asia that were related to IP soybeans on databases, such as SSGA, World Grain, and Nikkei. We were only able to find the results that we had already found. Since BULOG and the Thai Feed Mill Association are the largest soybean importers in their respective countries and the two countries are the largest importers of IP soybeans in Southeast Asia, we assumed that both BULOG and the Thai Feed Mill Association also import IP soybeans.

Thereafter, we shifted our focus towards identifying the major importers of specialty grains in Southeast Asia. We started by searching for directly available information across reports and articles on credible databases, such as Research Gate, SSGA, USDA, and World Grain. We were able to find many statistics related to specialty grains and their uses in the liquor industry. However, no information related to the major importers in Southeast Asia could be garnered. We then tried to find the major importers of the specialty grains in the individual countries in Southeast Asia. We were not able to find any companies that export these products even after looking across multiple reports, articles, and news pieces. We were only able to find some general statistics and news related to the specialty grains market and its growth in the region.

We also tried to triangulate the result by searching for the major exporters that export to Southeast Asia. We searched across statistical and report-related databases, such as Words Top Exports, SE ASIA, and USDA, to identify the major exporters. Our goal was to find the companies in Southeast Asia that imported these specialty grains products. We'd assume those specific companies to be the major importers. However, we were only able to find the global statistics that were not specific to Southeast Asia. Therefore, our attempt at triangulation also proved to be futile. We also tried going through older databases and reports. This strategy also did not work as we did not find any additional information. Everything we found while going through older sources had already been found using the aforementioned strategies.

Therefore, we were not able to present the major importers of specialty grains products in Southeast Asia. The reason why the information is unavailable could be the lack of enough influence of the specialty grains market in the specified region. During the course of the research, we were able to identify that one of the three companies that import IP soybeans (Cargill) also imports specialty grains. Therefore, we were able to identify one major importer of specialty grains products in Southeast Asia. In this way, our research was completed.


Part
11
of eleven
Part
11

IP Soybeans and Specialty Grains: North Asia Importers

Out of five significant importers of IP soybeans and specialty grains in north Asia identified from Korea, only one has a website, and it is not English-translated. In as much as there was a shortage of information on these importers, the way they are involved in the IP soybean and specialty grains market were illustrated by specifying their imports for these products. Some major importers are Korea Food Industry Association, Korea Soybean Foodstuffs Association, and Korea Jang Cooperative.

Overview

Major Importers of IP Soybeans and Specialty Grains

  • The major importer is the Korea Food Industry Association (KFIA) and it has a website. The KFIA is set up to "to promote the development of the food industry and the improvement of food sanitation; thus, contributing to the profit among food manufacturing industries and the enhancement of the health of the people." Under KORUS FTA IP Soybeans Quota Allocation, it imported 4,188 Metric Tons (MT) in 2018 and has a 4,267 MT allocation for 2019.
  • Another major importer listed under the KORUS FTA is Korea Soybean Foodstuffs Association, and it has no website listed anywhere. According to the name, it is assumed that it is an association of soybean foodstuffs company in Korea. With an allocation of 2,427 MT for 2019, it imported 2,068 MT in 2018, and its place of business is situated at "#302, 55, Gangnam-Daero 152-GIL, Gangnam-GU, Seoul, South Korea."
  • One other major importer is Korea Jang Cooperative, but no website was found anywhere for this importer. This importer is listed under the food and beverage industry, and the contact person is Mr In Sang Jo. It imported 5,362 MT in 2018 and has an allocation of 5,545 MT in 2019.
  • The Korea Bean Sprouts Association is another major importer listed under the KORUS FTA, and like many others, it has no website. While it accounted for 3,042 MT in 2018, its 2019 allocation was 2,819 MT. Its 2019 list of IP soybeans and specialty grains imports include non-GMO soybeans for sprouting.
  • Korea Federation of Tofu Coop. (KFTC) is also a major importer listed under the KORUS FTA, but it has no website. The importer holds the most massive volume of imports in 2018 (9,829 MT), along with the highest amount of allocation in 2019 (10,032 MT).

Research Strategy

We began our findings by trying to identify the major importers of IP soybeans and specialty grains, with a focus on Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. The intent was to pick at least one major importer from these three north Asian countries. But after combing through different platforms that could provide insights on this information, and without positive results, we settled for the major importers of IP soybeans and specialty grains from Korea.

Although there are other significant importers of soybeans in Korea, like the TTET Union Corporation, only the importers listed under the KORUS FTA were specific importers of IP soybeans and specialty grains. Unfortunately, out of the five mentioned in our findings, only one has a website, and it is not English-translated. After identifying each importer, we attempted to obtain their websites using their names in search portals, but it yielded no results. In our next attempt, we tried company directories such as Newmaker and TradeAtlas. There were no websites mentioned or listed on these platforms. What we found there was other information like importer's brief overview and importer's address.

Our last attempt took us to a market-intelligence platform like Panjiva, where research is carried out on suppliers, importers, and competitors. Although we found some sensitive information (like the bill of lading) of the importer on this platform, there was no mention of the website. We concluded that these importers do not have registered websites.

Even though there was inadequate information on these major importers, we were able to illustrate how they are involved in the IP soybean and specialty grains market by specifying their imports for 2018 and their allocation for 2019. From their import activities in 2018, it was seen that almost all the importers exhausted their allocations.
Sources
Sources

From Part 02
Quotes
  • "Phoenix Bean has been a premier supplier of tofu to the Chicagoland area for more than 30 years."
From Part 04
Quotes
  • "SSGA is a national alliance of companies focused on production, processing, and shipping of specialty soya and grains worldwide. Its mission is to provide resources that communicate the quality, diversity, and availability of their products."
From Part 11
Quotes
  • "to promote the development of food industry and the improvement of food sanitation, thus to contribute to the profit among food manufacturing industries and the enhancement of the health of the people."
Quotes
  • "KORUS FTA IP Soybeans Quota Allocation and Imports per Processor Association"
Quotes
  • "supports stronger trade relationships between Korean buyers and U.S. soybean suppliers."
  • "Korea purchased 25,000 tonnes of identity-preserved soybeans intended for food use from the U.S. in 2015 duty-free."
Quotes
  • "#302, 55, Gangnam-Daero 152-GIL, Gangnam-GU, Seoul, South Korea."