"So You Can Human" Tagline Analysis for Asian Markets

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"So You Can Human" Tagline Analysis for Asian Markets

In advertising, marketers must understand the environment in which they operate. Asia comprises multiple countries, each with its own culture; hence, brands should factor this into consideration. We analyzed the tagline "so you can human" in Asian markets.

CHINESE

  • The Chinese word for humans is 人的(Rén de). In Chinese, ren is associated with words like humanity, goodness, benevolence, and love.

Language differences between Chinese and English

  • Chinese is topic prominent. That means that the topic of a sentence could come before the subject in that sentence.

Conclusion

We found no evidence to suggest that the word human would have a negative impact on the Chinese people. After considering the language differences listed above, we noted that "human" as a verb would remain unchanged, and there would be no misinterpretations in the tagline "so you can human."

JAPANESE

  • The Japanese word for "human" is 人間 (Ningen), which is associated with a mythical sea monster that lives near the icy water in Antarctica.

Language differences between Japanese and English

  • In Japanese sentences, it is allowed to cut more words than in English sentences in what is referred to as an ellipsis. They also often don't use subjects and prepositions.

Conclusion

The relation between "Ningen" and a mythical sea monster might lead to people perceiving the tagline wrongly. We also found out that the Japanese often don't use subjects and prepositions such as "you." The verb, in this case, would remain unchanged - in the simple present tense.

KOREAN

The Korean word for humans is 인간 (ingan). Other possible meanings for 인간 (ingan) include humanity, mankind, and creature.

Language differences between Korean and English

  • Grammatical categories in Korea are not similar to those of English. This often results in Korean learners using a noun or adjective where English would have an adjective or a noun.

Conclusion

There was no evidence to suggest that the tagline "so you can human" would be viewed negatively in Korea. Despite the linguistic differences between Korean and English, we found no other possible meanings to the tagline "so you can human" with a negative impact.

Research Strategy

Firstly, we translated the phrase "so you can human" to the three major Asian languages: Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. We then searched for any social or cultural implications that the phrase would have in the three Asian countries. The linguistic differences between the Asian languages and English were also looked into for any misinterpretations. We then drew a conclusion.
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