RFID Chips and Marketing

Part
01
of seven
Part
01

RFID Chips - Current Market Insights (Marketing Perspective)

RFID technology is currently being used for marketing purposes in the retail apparel industry, at events and festivals, and through proximity marketing. Marketing strategies range from providing data on sustainability of clothing items, reinventing the store fitting room experience, easily collecting data from consumers for future marketing campaigns, and marketing to consumers on a continual basis by meeting them where they are.

Retail Apparel

More RFID tags have been purchased for the retail apparel industry than for any other use. Cumulatively through 2018, 26,350 million tags have been used on apparel items. This accounts for 34.4% (26350/76644*100) of the 76,644 million total tags purchased. Although initially the tags were used for purposes of tracking stock and reducing theft, they are now being used for a variety of marketing strategies.

Consumers are becoming much more conscious of the products they are purchasing, and purchasing decisions are influenced by the values of the company producing and selling the products. When customers can learn details about a piece of clothing, such as the composition of the fabric, whether it was produced using sustainable practices, and whether it is fair-labor certified, they are more likely to make a purchase. Burberry is an example of a brand that is using RFID tags to provide information to customers on how items are produced.

A second way that RFID tags are being used in the apparel industry for marketing is in the use of smart fitting rooms. Fixed readers are installed in the fitting rooms, and can be tied into a screen. When the customer tries on an article of clothing with a tag, the screen displays details on how the item was produced and suggestions of other items that would go well with it. RFID tags are also being tied into smart mirrors. The mirror can work as a typical mirror, but can also let the customer see what the item would look like in a different color, or notify the attendant that they need a different size. The tags can even play music that matches the style of clothing being tried on. Retailers can also use the RFID tags to find products that aren't being purchased after being tried on to determine if there are issues with fit or construction. Burberry, Ralph Lauren, Rebecca Minkoff, and Neiman Marcus have all successfully implemented smart fitting rooms in at least some of their stores.

Events/Festivals

While RFID technology at music festivals is not new, some of the ways it is being used is. Initially, RFID technology was used to replace tickets and cash. It allowed attendees to flash a wristband to get in, and then they were able to purchase food, beverages, and merchandise without having to carry a wallet or credit card. Now the technology is being expanded beyond the basics to provide personalized experiences for attendees and marketing opportunities for sponsors. By using RFID enabled bands to encourage attendees to participate in raffles, giveaways and games, sponsors at events are able to collect data on attendees unobtrusively, and can use that data for future marketing campaigns.

When Food & Wine was looking to upgrade the festival experience for attendees, they looked to RFID technology. Attendees were give SavorBands which allowed them to track the foods and beverages they tried at various food festivals and receive recipes from their favorites. This created a connection with the restaurants/chefs who made the food but also allowed for the collection of data. Knowing which dishes were liked the most and which specific attendees accessed the recipes provided invaluable marketing information to the sponsors of the event.

Proximity Marketing

Often marketing takes place in a specific location. Customers read an ad in a magazine, see a post on social media, or are given a flier which often ends up in the garbage. RFID can take proximity, or location-based, marketing to the next level. By giving potential customers an RFID-enabled item that they carry with them, the marketing can follow them as well. Every time the potential customer comes into a specified area, the RFID is automatically scanned and a video, image, or message can be delivered directly to the customer with tremendous personalization.

Two examples of proximity marketing, as well as emotional branding, at work are the Battersea #LookingForYou campaign and the Support Your Marathoner Campaign at the NYC Marathon. Battersea created a campaign where a dog that was looking for a home appeared on screens every time someone carrying a RFID-enable flier came into proximity. This meant that the person would see the same dog following them, the same way it might in reality. After a certain number of times, the person received a message about Battersea.

The NYC Marathon used RFID-enabled race bibs to play personalized support videos from friends and family as they were running the race. This allowed the runners to receive a level of support that was never before possible. Videos of both campaigns in action can be seen here.
Part
02
of seven
Part
02

RFID Chips - Future Market Insights (Marketing Perspective)

Three insights into the future RFID chip market from a marketing perspective are that RFID technology is changing fashion retail marketing, as it's being used to incentivize customers to make extra purchases; RFID gaming is being used for marketing at events; and RFID wristbands are being adopted at events, as they encourage customers to show off a brand and get people talking about it.

1. RFID TECHNOLOGY IS CHANGING THE FASHION RETAIL MARKETING

The fashion retail industry is implementing RFID to transform the customer experience, from walking into the store to fitting rooms, and finally checking out of the store. RFID tags attached to fashion items along with readers and computer screens inside fitting rooms, enable shoppers to learn more about items of interest. The screen shows the customer matching items that they may also want to buy by displaying alternative products, as an incentive for making extra purchases.

THE FUTURE:

In the future, RFID tags along with augmented reality could be used to show customers how certain clothes might look like when they are worn, incentivizing them to buy the products. John Lewis, UK leader in retailing, is piloting two Cisco StyleMe Virtual Fashion Mirrors, which are part of the next-generation technology for engaging consumers, helping them visualize items and interact with products.

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE:

  • At Burberry, RFID tags are included in products, which can connect with shoppers’ mobiles, giving them insight into the production process or recommending ways to wear or used the product.
  • The fashion retailer, Mango, has invested in new smart fitting rooms that make use of RFID. Mango employees can communicate with shoppers with smart mirrors, through which shoppers can ask for different sizes, colors, or additional items.
  • Ralph Lauren also uses these mirrors to offer customers information on additional sizes and colors, and complementary items.
  • Rebecca Minkoff uses RFID in tables and iPads to avoid having customers wait in line to pay.

2. RFID GAMING IS BEING USED FOR MARKETING IN EVENTS

RFID technologies have been used at live sports events for the purpose of engaging assistants in games to win prizes.

THE FUTURE:

In the future, events will play by Generation Z’s rules, as texting is their form of communication, gamification is their learning tool, and social media is their tool for social justice. Event apps have now become necessary to link attendees to content, schedules, social media, networking, and gamification.

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE:

In 2014, at the UEFA Champions League Festival in London, 30,000 event-goers "joined the game" using RFID cards supplied by ID&C to play games and win big prizes. With event sponsor and partner branding, photos of the gaming event were posted in social media. As a result, there were 85,000 RFID activations onsite and over 45 million page impressions online.

3. RFID WRISTBANDS ARE BEING IMPLEMENTED IN EVENTS

Using RFID tags for marketing events enables attendees to share the event or brand with their friends on social media. On the wrist or around the neck, the branded RFID tags attract the interest of consumers and drives them towards an event. RFID technology also allows attendees to enter instant competitions and receive more information by just tapping a wristband.

THE FUTURE:

The use of RFID wristbands for events is here to stay for the future of marketing. Using RFID wristbands will make customers proud to show off a brand and get people talking about it. RFID wristbands will continue to evolve, and in the near future, attendees could be walking around an event wearing their identities on their sleeves, allowing exhibitioners to know the interests of guests and appeal to exactly what they want.

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE:

  • RFID wristbands were used at the Israel Coca-Cola Village party to enable picture and experience sharing via Facebook.
  • RFID wristbands were also used at the Honda Power of Dreams Auto Show, to trigger events around the place, engaging attendees with the brand.
Part
03
of seven
Part
03

RFID Chips - Implementation as Marketing Tools

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chips are currently been implemented as marketing tools globally. Examples of these implementations that exclude industrial or inventory management include: customer tracking throughout their purchase journey, smart fitting rooms, and product information and promotions. Below is a deep dive into these global implementations.

Smart Fitting Rooms

Global implementation of RFID as marketing tools is in the development of smart fitting rooms which promote customer shopping experiences. Smart fitting rooms have smart mirrors which read the RFID tags and using AI, provide customers with information on products that complement the selected product. For example, Marie Claire adopted smart fitting rooms that detect the product the customer is trying on and through the smart mirrors provide different color and size options, as well as, offer examples of matching products. Moreover, the customer has the option of paying for the items through the brand's online app. This implementation has provided a 59% increase in basket size sales and enhanced customer conversions. This smart fitting room concept has also been adopted by other global luxury brands including Neiman Marcus, Ralph Lauren, and Rebecca Minkoff (this brand has credited the technology to a 30% increase in sales volume).

Real-time customer tracking through-out the purchase journey

Another interesting insight on the use of RFID chips as marketing tools is their effectiveness in providing real-time in-store tracking of customers through-out their purchase journey. RFID, when fused with Internet of Things (IoT) allows retailers to track customers and identify which products are selected by which type of customers (age, sex, and race), payment methods selected, and what time these products are bought among other details which retailers are using to enhance their placing, promotions, and pricing leading to better customer experiences, as well as, improved sales volumes. Companies that have used RFID in tracking customers include The Lion'esque Group, Rebecca Minkoff, and Burberry.

PRODUCT INFORMATION AND PROMOTION

RFID chips technology has been used in providing additional product information and promotion details. For example, Burberry incorporates RFID and customers' smartphones to display information regarding the processes used in producing products, as well as, available promotions for products that a customer picks from the shelf. Likewise, Hellmann’s Mayonnaise has a promotion in Sao Paulo whereby shopping carts are fitted with screens and RFID readers which display recipes that utilize Hellman's Mayonnaise with the selected groceries leading to increased sales of the brand's mayonnaise.
Part
04
of seven
Part
04

RFID Chips - Future Implementation as Marketing Tools

The future of RFID chips as marketing tools has not yet been disclosed, but with predictions and expert evaluations, individuals can make very well-informed assumptions of what this will be, in general - not specific to marketing. Research shows that RFID has the ability to streamline production ahead of what is feasible now, increasing efficiency, and accuracy. RFID could be a tool that facilitates individuals to "feed millions and bring health care and aid to those who need it most all around the world."

Methodology

First, we combed through industry reports from authoritative databases like MarketWatch, PPPMag.com, Advanced Mobile Group, and more for studies or insights into the future implementation of RFID chips as marketing tools. Although MarketWatch and PPPMag.com have reports detailing the RFID chips industry such as the market size, the growth rate, challenges, key players, and more - information about the future implementation of the chips in marketing is broadly unavailable. Additionally, the Advance Mobile Group offered a very brief summary of some predictions/speculations and expert evaluations of what the future of RFID chips, in general, could look without attempting to illustrate how it applies to marketing.

To further our approach, we reviewed credible media sites that publish articles about the RFID chips industry for speculations, predictions or expert evaluations, and if possible references to studies wherein the future of the RFID chips in marketing is addressed. These sites include Forbes, bmmagazine.co and StartupGuys.net. We were able to find information on how supermarkets are using RFID chips to supercharge the marketing of products like fries, ketchup, and mayo. That has been achieved by fitting out shopping carts with RFID enabled screens which interact with tags on product shelves. Unfortunately, we could not find any information about how RFID chips will be used in the future as marketing tools.


We also searched through academic journals for the required information on RFID chips. During our search, we came across an RFID journal which publishes the world's leading source of RFID News and Information. We found data regarding how RFID is being adopted in a wide variety of industries, including aircraft manufacturing, consumer electronics, consumer packaged goods, defense, homeland security, and retail. Regrettably, no insights into the future implementation of RFID chips as marketing tools was disclosed.

As a last resort, after searching extensively, we broadened our research in an effort to extrapolate this information. In pursuance, we examined the four global companies (Rebecca Minkoff, Burberry, H&M, and Amazon) identified from the previous request as using RFID chips for marketing. For each, we explored the official website for remarks or comments they might have made regarding the future use of RFID chips as marketing tools. Regrettably, the companies only report how they are currently using the tool; for example, H&M uses RFID chips to give customers a 'friction-free' customer experience while Amazon uses it to give consumers convenience and leisure once they enter their Amazon Go store. We even searched through websites that publish about RFID chips such as Token. "Token is a global provider of advanced RFID solutions that is pioneering a new age of cashless payments, access control and experiential activations at events of all sizes." This source only gave us the current implementations of RFID chips in marketing but not future use.

We believe this information does not exist because RFID in the retail sector is still a new concept. Therefore, researchers, experts, market analyst, etc. have not yet predicted the future implementation of RFID chips as marketing tools.

Key findings

According to research, there are a number of ways grocery retailers will be able to innovate by implementing RFID chip technology successfully. Firstly, retailers will have the privilege for more frequent engagement with customers, by reminding them of the products they regularly purchase.
With the RFID technology, touch points are extended and grocery retailers will be able to apprehend each client’s personal behaviors and preferences more easily. "Paired with omnichannel marketing tactics, this information can be used to better market to individual customers."

The global RFID tags market is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 7.6% during the estimated period of 2017-2023.

In the future retailers will be able to use RFID for both external and in-store advertisement. Tags can be installed on an external advertisement or in-store POS materials which attracted persons can obtain by swiping their mobile phones above them. "This can send personal information about the product they have seen advertised or open up a web page on their browser. It can be used to send detailed product specs, stock availability info, or give them a discount voucher to use in store."

Lastly, "RFID chips can be used as a powerful data analysis tool that allows event marketers to learn more about their guests from the moment they purchase tickets online until they leave the event, and even afterward (if there is further interaction with the same buyer). Organizers can become much more aware of the attendance times, purchasing patterns and other behaviors of their clientele."

Part
05
of seven
Part
05

RFID Chips for Marketing - Companies

Radio Frequency Identification Technology has been around for quite some time. However, it has only seen recent success from various retailers that have found ways to integrate the technology to its bottom line marketing. The technology is integrated into loyalty programs, personalization, and "counter-less" shopping. Four global companies are using RFID chips for marketing purposes, and these are Rebecca Minkoff, Burberry, Amazon, and H&M.

Four Global Companies Using RFID Chips for Marketing

Rebecca Minkoff

Rebecca Minkoff is a fashion store that sells all kinds of luxury handbags, footwear, clothing, and accessories. The company is using RFID chips to keep customers loyal to their store.

The company has integrated its loyalty program alongside with its ten limited edition “smart handbags” for spring. The company did this with the use of RFID-enabled tags. Each limited edition bag has an RFID handtag which qualifies the consumer for the loyalty program and the benefits it offers such as private styling sessions, style recommendations, video content, and an invitation to the company’s next fashion show. Additionally, the company is planning to capitalize more into this by expanding the rewards of the loyalty program to third parties. This plan is to incentivize consumers to wear the bag more often and eventually drive brand loyalty. The company is also known to use RFID chips and iPads as a way for their consumers to shop easily within their stores.

Burberry

Burberry is another luxury fashion retailer that is using big data, artificial intelligence, and RFID technology to further its advantage against its competition. It does this by asking the company’s consumers if it can use their data for personalizing product recommendations both online and in store.

Additionally, they are using RFID tags in 500 stores in 50 different countries to communicate with consumer’s mobile phones, giving the consumers different information such as how they were produced and recommendations on how to wear them or how they can be used. CEO Angela Ahrendts commented on the program stating that “walking through our doors is just like walking into our website”.

H&M

Another example in the list of global companies using RFID chips for marketing purposes is the fashion giant H&M. The company turned to technology when it went through years of deteriorating performance in sales. RFID technology is one of the technologies that brought H&M back on the market.

The company is using RFID technology to give customers a “friction-free” customer experience. This “friction-free” customer experience gives consumers recommendations for merchandise that is selected for them through algorithms. This gives customers a faster time to make decisions instead of looking for various products within the store itself. In addition to this, the experience gives the customer the ability to “Scan and Buy”, in where customers can scan an in-store label and check if the item is available in another retail shop or if it is available online. The technology also offers a “Find A Store” feature where they could search for a product they want online and see if there is a physical store nearby where they can buy their selected product.

Amazon

Amazon is no stranger to RFID technology. Amazon is using RFID technology to give consumers convenience and leisure once they enter their Amazon Go store. The technology offers consumers the ability to simply grab an item they want and then leave the store, no checkout counters, no questions asked. The store will then charge the items that the consumer walked out with, to their Amazon account. The receipt for the purchase will also be sent digitally. The shopping experience consumers the feeling like "they are stealing," and consumers explain the experience to be liberating. This customer experience was done through the combination of different technologies such as cameras, RFID, and sensors within the store. RFID tags help the seamless experience by collecting the purchase information of the consumer and sending the virtual bill to the consumer’s Amazon account.
Part
06
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Part
06

RFID Chips for Marketing - Companies Part 2

Four additional global companies using RFID chips for marketing purposes include Ralph Lauren, Neiman Marcus, Lululemon, and Marks & Spencer. As per reports by Chron and Business2Community, the adoption of RFID chips is most prominent among retailers. Chron's report observed that retail businesses place RFID tags on individual products, allowing them to capture a variety of customer marketing information, as well as promote recommended products. Furthermore, Chron's report noted that RFID chips enhance brands to enhance their retail operations.

Please, note that to ensure we provided the required information pertinent to global brands, we only included companies with locations/sales outlets in different parts of the world in this report, which is this case are companies such as Ralph Lauren, Neiman Marcus, Lululemon, and Marks & Spencer.

Research Findings

Four additional Global Brands Using RFID Chips for Marketing Purposes

1. NEIMAN MARCUS

Neiman Marcus Group, Inc. is a chain of luxury department stores with headquarters in the USA and locations spread around the globe. Here is a link to the company's website.

Neiman Marcus implemented MemoMi memory mirrors that automatically recognize products worn by a customer through RFID tags. Using this technology, shoppers who are still on the fence on selected items can add virtual accessories to their looks, as well as change different color patterns, without leaving the changing room. Also, at Neiman Marcus' beauty counter, these RFID tag-powered mirrors give shoppers personalized tutorials on makeup and provide details of products used in the tutorial as a recommendation for them to purchase. Hence, the company is able to meld the in-person and online experience for customers, as well as offer a significant level of personalization that builds brand loyalty and drives customers to revisit its stores.

2. RALPH LAUREN

Ralph Lauren is an American corporation that produces mid-range to luxury fashion products. The company is known for clothing, marketing, and distribution of products in 4 categories including apparel, accessories, home, and fragrances. Here is a link to the company's website.

Ralph Lauren uses RFID technology to identify items shoppers take into the fitting room automatically. Then, it provides them with a list of available sizes and colors of the same product, without the shopper asking. Hence, this enables Ralph Lauren to improve the in-store customer experience while also advertising other products to customers in the form of recommendations.

3. Lululemon

Lululemon is a yoga-inspired luxury apparel company for men and women. The company has its headquarters in Canada and locations in the US, Oman, and other parts of the world. Here is a link to Lululemon's website.

Lululemon implemented the "Tyco Retail RFID Fitting Room," which offers customers visibility to item-level inventory in the fitting room and provides additional insight into the company's stockroom and sales floor. The RFID chip helps sales associates better assist customers, as well as identify promotional opportunities to recommend other products and boost sales.

4. Marks & Spencer

Marks & Spencer specializes in selling clothing, luxury home and food products. The company has locations across the globe with its headquarters in London. Here is a link to Marks & Spencer's website.

Marks & Spencer uses RFID chips to improve on-shelf availability, as well as deliver more value to customers by identifying and promoting products shoppers want to buy. This strategic deployment enabled Marks & Spencer to market products that shoppers were more likely to buy directly to them, which helped the company to increase margins and reduce mark-downs.
Part
07
of seven
Part
07

RFID Chips for Marketing-Case Studies

Two case studies of companies that have used RFID chips to solve marketing problems include Adidas and the Battersea Dogs & Cats Home. Adidas used RFID chips to solve a personalization problem, while Battersea Dogs & Cats Home used RFID to solve the issue of geo-targeting. Details of each case study have been presented below.

ADIDAS

Problem: To mark the 30 years anniversary of sponsoring the Boston Marathon, Adidas pledged to make personalized videos for each of the over 30,000 registered runners at the event, with the hopes that these videos were shared across social media. The videos were also going to be available just a few hours after crossing the finish line. A marketing feat of such proportion would require lots of cameras following the over 30,000 participants, as well as plenty of employees to make such feat a reality. However, the crux of the campaign and the major problem was capturing each participant's personalized journey through the course of the race.

Solution: To circumvent the need for multiple cameras and to ensure each participant had a personalized video of their experience and nail down the crux of the campaign, Adidas embedded radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips in racers' bibs. These chips tracked the participants' location and time in lieu of the camera positions and made the videos relevant to each person. The RFID chips were linked with "street mats transmitting ultra-high frequency radio signals via antennae, which would then feed the runners' data to Adidas' teams." The use of RFID chips also ensured only 8 cameras were used by an 18-man crew. The campaign earned Adidas rave reviews on major publications such as Adweek, Entrepreneur and The Drum, while also resonating with the participants. Over 25% of participants shared their video to social media, with 95% video completion rate. The campaign also drove more than 80,000 visitors to Adidas' web properties as well as cause a 1,189% increase in product sales via email.

Battersea Dogs & Cats Home

Problem: Battersea Dogs & Cats Home wanted to increase pet adoption from its animal shelter with the launch of a new campaign — #LookingForYou. The overall idea of the campaign was to mimic the way homeless dogs follow people around. The challenge was in two folds: the first was how to determine when someone was close to a billboard in order to activate the video that mimics the way homeless dogs follow people, and the other was how to ensure the video is targeted at an interested audience.

Solution: To solve this conundrum, the company shared leaflets that were embedded with RFID chips/tags and synced with RFID smart billboards. Once people holding the leaflets pass any of the RFID smart billboards, the billboards begin to show a video of a dog following them. The emotional engagement of the dog following the target audience "generated a heightened awareness of re-homing Battersea Dogs & Cats Home dogs." In the year the campaign was launched, the Battersea Dogs & Cats Home re-homed more than 3,000 dogs.
Sources
Sources

From Part 01
Quotes
  • "Data suggests that customers are more likely to buy when they can see information about sustainability and composition, and such data can be linked to an RFID supplier tag offering data about its manufacture. For example, provide a copy of certification via an opted-in phone notification regarding whether a product is made of 100 percent organic Egyptian cotton, is fair labor-certified and so forth."
Quotes
  • "In 2015, the company announced that their investment in personalized customer management programs had resulted in a 50% increase in repeat custom."
Quotes
  • "The idea of smart fitting rooms is being popularized among retailers for a long time now. Media has been speaking about the first concepts of using interactive screens and augmented reality to simplify the fitting process since 2010. But really viable cases appeared only a few years ago."
Quotes
  • "Lollapalooza, Bonnaroo and many other music festivals have now adopted the use of RFID (Radio-Frequency Identification) wristbands. To keep it simple, these tech-savvy wristbands include a chip (Micro not potato) that allow fans to efficiently enter the festival, make cashless purchases (Super dangerous when alcohol is involved), and connect with other attendees using proximity technology, which allows you to track and directly communicate with attendees through social media via your mobile device."
From Part 04
Quotes
  • "RFID can be seen as similar to a bar code system. However, instead of using an optical scanner to read the bars, it uses radio waves to read data from small chips, known as tags. This more advanced technology enables it to have far more applications and offer many more benefits than a bar code system is capable of."
Quotes
  • " RFID has the potential to streamline production beyond what is available today, increasing efficiency, and accuracy. In part this could create a better more intuitive way of living for everyone in the world. In a larger scale RFID could be a tool that enables us to feed millions and bring health care and aide to those who need it most all around the world."
From Part 05
Quotes
  • "..luxury fashion retailer Rebecca Minkoff launched a collection of 10 limited-edition smart handbags in time for spring. Each “connected” bag comes equipped with a RFID-enabled handtag that qualifies the owner for the company’s loyalty program and unlocks exclusive perks like private styling sessions, style recommendations, video content, and an invitation to the brand’s next fashion show."
Quotes
  • "Products in their 500 stores spread across 50 countries are also fitted with RFID tags which can communicate with shoppers’ mobiles, giving information about how items were produced or recommendations on how they can be worn or used."
Quotes
  • "Burberry is a global luxury brand with a distinctly British attitude, renowned for extraordinary creativity and tireless innovation. "
Quotes
  • "Today, Rebecca Minkoff is a global brand with a wide range of apparel, handbags, footwear, jewelry and accessories (including tech) as well as men’s accessories under the label Uri Minkoff. "
Quotes
  • "H&M is already offering personalized recommendations for online shoppers, but it will soon bring that capability to its brick-and-mortar stores through RFID technology. When they are in the store, customers can explore suggestions for merchandise selected for them by algorithms. "
Quotes
  • "the womenswear store Hennes opened in Västerås, Sweden. Today, the H&M group is a global fashion and design company with 47 markets of 71 markets offering both store and online shopping."
From Part 06
Quotes
  • "Retail business owners can use remote scanners to read RFID tags placed on individual products, enabling them to record a variety of information, including quantities of various stock items and their precise locations."
  • "RFID tags carry unique product numbers. If consumers pay for goods with a credit, debit or shopper’s discount card, retailers can link the purchases to the recorded RFID data and use that marketing information to map out individual consumers’ movements through a store. This sort of data can help a retail store make improvements, for example, by helping to optimize a store’s layout to match typical consumer behaviors."
Quotes
  • "As RFID is rapidly gaining adoption within the retail industry across the globe, it is one of the key technologies being applied to help enhance a retailer’s operations."
Quotes
  • "The retailer also implemented the Tyco Retail RFID Fitting Room, which offers visibility to item-level inventory in the fitting room with additional insight into the stockroom and sales floor. This helps sales associates better assist customers, monitor the area to combat shrink, enable fitting room merchandising and promotional opportunities, and boost sales."