Is there any research/data I can reference to support the following assumption – When shopping online for an expensive ("big ticket") item, people may research the item from their mobile device, but they tend to make the actual purchase from a lap...

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Is there any research/data I can reference to support the following assumption – When shopping online for an expensive ("big ticket") item, people may research the item from their mobile device, but they tend to make the actual purchase from a laptop/desktop. Or, in other words, for expensive items, is there a correlation between which device people use and how they close they are to making a purchase?

There are several pieces of research and data that directly and indirectly show that although people research expensive items with mobile devices, they tend to make the actual purchase with a desktop device. About 37% of mobile users switched to desktop to make a purchase. In general, more than 70% of items are purchased with a desktop, and this chart from Comscore shows that consumers prefer making more expensive digital purchase with their desktop. Below, you will find more details.

FINDINGS

We found several data that show that the assumption that when people are looking to purchase expensive items online, they may research the item from their mobile device, but they tend to make the actual purchase from a laptop/desktop is correct.
A survey by Appsee showed that 37% of mobile users said that they switched to a desktop to make the purchase. Although mobile usage is on the increase, "people still tend to switch to desktops to complete their transaction", especially for more expensive items where customers are more comfortable with desktops for making such purchase online. For instance, although 75% of people went online via a mobile device, 70% of people bought cars via their desktops, compared to 36% of people who did with their mobile device. For Insurance, 70% of people purchased with a desktop, compared to 37% that did with a mobile device. Even for an item such as mobile phones, although 63% of people researched with a mobile, only 52% of people purchased with a mobile phone. On the other hand, although 59% of people researched mobile phones with their desktop, 63% of people bought mobile phones with their desktop.
According to Marketing Chart, "data from comScore supports what may be an intuitive point about e-commerce purchases: mobile purchases tend to be higher for relatively cheap and low consideration products such as video games, movies, and digital content, and lower for more expensive categories such as computer hardware." The Comscore chart clearly shows that people preferred to make more expensive purchases via desktop.
In general, "conversion rates are still highest offline, with 82% of customers choosing to purchase in store, 45% on their home desktop or tablet and only 17% on mobile phone." The number slightly improved in the first quarter of 2016, with mobile device accounting for 19% of all digital purchases, with desktop accounting for 81%.
For e-commerce, conversion rate and add-to-cart rate for mobile devices is much lower compared to that of desktop devices. The add-to-cart rate is 8.52% for desktop devices, 8.58% for tablet devices, and 4.70% for smartphones. In terms of conversion, desktop tops with 2.78%, followed by tablets with 2.42%, while smartphone conversion rate is just 0.80%.
Monetate’s data reveals that conversion in the US is 3.73% on desktop and 1.14% on a smartphone, while in the UK, desktop users convert at a rate of 5.15% versus 2.52% on smartphone. About 90% of US users switch between various devices to complete a purchase.
The reason customers are more comfortable making purchases on larger screens like that of desktop and tablet is that navigation is less cumbersome and because of security. According to eMarketer, "32% of global mobile users refrain from purchasing on mobile due to concerns over data privacy, while 31% are worried about security issues."

CONCLUSION

To wrap up, data from several researches show that although people use mobile to research expensive products online, they tend to switch to desktop computers for the actual purchase, especially for more expensive items.
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Sources