Purebred Dog Surrender, Canada

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Purebred Dog Surrender, Canada

In Canada, there were around 542 young, purebred dogs surrendered to shelters in 2015. This number was not available as a definite statistic and thus was triangulated using information publicly available from the Canadian Federation of Humane Societies and K9RescueMe. Statistics provided by these organizations regarding the number of dogs total given up for adoption, and the breakdown of that number as it applies to the age and whether a dog is purebred, were used to calculate the final figure. Data specific to Labrador Retrievers was not available beyond the fact that they are the most popular dog breed in Canada as of 2017. Trending statistics specific to juvenile, purebred dogs were not available; as a result, the majority of the facts and figures provided herein are applicable to the dog population of Canada as a whole. Additionally, statistics regarding purebred dogs who were returned to their breeders were unavailable.

Purebred Dog Surrender in Canada

Roughly 542 purebred, juvenile dogs were surrendered to shelters in Canada by their owners in 2015. This number was determined using statistics available from the Canadian Federation of Humane Societies and K9RescueMe. In total, 10,043 dogs were surrendered for adoption in Canada 2015. Of this number, 18% were classified as juveniles, and between 30%-35% were identified as purebred. Using these figures (and electing to use the lower end of the estimated number of purebred dogs surrendered for adoption), 542 was calculated by using the following equation: 10,043 * .18 * .30 = 542. This number is attributable to several longstanding reasons why an owner might surrender their pet. As it pertains to juvenile dogs specifically, people who might not have the time, money, or patience to properly train puppies will often leave them at shelters if they see no other alternative. Other reasons for dog surrender include dog allergies within a household, and possible aggression.

Statistics available indicate that the general dog population in Canada is on the rise; between 2014 and 2016, the dog population increased from 6.4 million to 7.6 million. This is due in part to the number of dogs being brought into Canada from countries all over the world. In 2013, it was reported that "tens of thousands" of dogs were brought into Canada over a five-year time span. There were no statistics available for how many of these dogs were purebred, juvenile, or both, but the significance of this statistic as it applies to the general increase in dog population is notable.

To examine these statistics on a smaller scale, information from the Hamilton Animal Shelter in Ontario indicates that in the first quarter of 2016, there were 244 dogs total received. Of that number, only 37 dogs were surrendered by their owners. This small number was not broken down by age or whether a dog was purebred. Based on this sample size, it can be presumed that the number of purebred dogs, juvenile dogs, and those that fall into both of those categories tend toward the lower end of the scale as well.

As the dog population has increased, the adoption rate for dogs in shelters has gone up (48% as of 2016); however, the euthanasia rate has also increased slightly, with about 10% of dogs brought into shelters as of 2016 being euthanized (the number of dogs euthanized prior to the increase to 10% was not provided). Presumably, this broad statistic indicates that adoption and euthanasia rates for purebred, juvenile dogs have likely fluctuated similarly — an increase in adoptions, and a slight increase in euthanizations.

Conclusion

In 2015, around 542 young, purebred dogs were surrendered to shelters by their owners. This figure was achieved by calculating the number of dogs total surrendered to shelters in 2015, the percentage of these dogs identified as juveniles, and the percentage that were identified as purebred: 10,043 * .18 * .30 = 542. Over the past five years, the total population of dogs in Canada has increased, and in turn, the adoption rate has increased (as well as the euthanasia rate). Due to the absence of statistics specifically pertaining to juvenile, purebred dog surrender in Canada, it can be assumed based on these general statistics that the percentages of dogs surrendered, adopted, and euthanized fluctuate similarly, with the overall increase in dog population pointing to an increase in each of these categories yearly. Statistics about the number of purebred dogs who were returned to their breeders rather than surrendered to a shelter were not available.
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