Printer Papers

Part
01
of four
Part
01

Printer Papers: History

The history of printer papers can be traced back to the history of the creation of paper and the creation of the printing press. Paper was first created in CA 3000 in Egypt from papyrus plants; ink came from lamp-black created in China. Cost of typesetting, evolving technology, and the growing demands of digital prints are some reasons for the invention of different printing papers. Continue below for a deep dive into our findings.

HISTORY OF PAPERS

  • In CA 3000, the first paper was produced from papyrus plants in Egypt.
  • The first paper mill was established in 794 in Baghdad (present-day Iraq) during the Abbasid dynasty.
  • In 1690, papermaking was established in America in Philadelphia. That year, the first newspaper was published in Boston in the American colonies — public occurrences, both foreign and domestic.
  • In 1774, paper recycling was invented by jurist Justus Claproth.
  • Papers were initially made from shredding old rags and clothes — increasing demands for papers led to the invention of other types of papers.

HISTORY OF PRINTER PAPERS

  • The history of printer papers can be traced back to the history of the creation of paper and the creation of the printing press. Paper was first created in CA 3000 in Egypt from papyrus plants; ink came from lamp-black created in China.
  • In 1282, watermarks were first used in Italian-made paper.
  • Crosses, ovals, areolas, knots, triangles, 3 hills, and pommee crosses were some watermarks designs in the 13th century.
  • One of the major setbacks of the use of watermarks was associated with its inability to bear dates.
  • In 1757, the woven paper was created, while in 1805, carbon paper was developed.
  • In 1806, Ralph Wedgwood received a patient for the invention of carbon paper — primarily used for printing.
  • In 1851, paper made from wood pulp was developed.
  • Cost of typesetting, evolving technology, and the growing demands of digital prints are some reasons for the invention of different printing papers.
  • In 1855, the term bond paper was used -a durable paper used for documents.
  • Bond paper, gloss coated paper, matt coated paper, silk coated paper, uncoated paper, and watermarked paper are some printing papers.
  • Bond paper are used to print of letterheads, typed reports and envelopes.
  • Gloss coated paper are used in the printing of magazines.
  • Matt coated paper are used to print flyers and leaflets.

HISTORY OF PRINTER PAPERS STANDARD

HISTORY OF PRINTER

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To provide an overview of how the different types of paper came into existence, we began by combing through news, press releases, and credible magazines. To provide an extensive report regarding the history of printing paper, our research team made use of older sources that have reported an in-depth analysis regarding printing papers. We went further to locate why each category of paper was developed. We utilize Printing History reports, BBC News, CSUN reports, Science Direct databases, and others.
Part
02
of four
Part
02

Printer Papers: Characteristics

Many papers created for inkjet printers have a higher brightness since the ink is see-through; this ensures that the "paper doesn’t interfere with the vividness of the printed image" while the ones for laser printers are a bit blurred. One of the similarities is that uncoated paper is typically used in both types of printers, although coated papers can also be used. For the ColorLok seal paper, it is used in both printers and give higher print quality in inkjet. For office papers that can be used in both printers, excellent print quality is noted in laser printers.

DIFFERENCES IN THE KINDS OF PAPER USED IN INKJET VS LASER PRINTERS

  • The ink used in inkjet printers soaks into the paper, so the paper needs to be able to allow for this without significant bleeding of the ink. Conversely, the paper used in laser printers and copiers use toners that leave the ink on the surface of the paper.
  • The paper coated for inkjets allows for the heavier ink coverage, while coated papers for laser printers use lighter, engineering copier toner coatings. As an example, using glossy paper created for a laser printer in an inkjet printer would create a printing that smears easily since the ink would not stick to the paper.
  • There are a wide variety of inkjet printers and a huge selection of different types of paper, and therefore, a wide variety of coatings used on the papers for varying printers. Four kinds of inkjet paper coatings include aqueous, eco-solvent, latex, and UV-cure. Interestingly, paper manufacturers sometimes create their own "unique coating formulations for the specific printing requirements of different types of customers".
  • Many papers created for inkjet printers have a higher brightness since the ink is see-through; this ensures that the "paper doesn’t interfere with the vividness of the printed image" while the ones for laser printers are a bit blurred.
  • To help the toner get burned onto the image, laser papers have high brightness and gloss; therefore, it produces a higher resolution on text or images. Laser paper is commonly thick so it can tolerate the heat coming from the rollers.
  • Paper and special media used in laser printers have a higher heat-resistance level than paper created for other types of printers. The paper used in the laser printer also has few coatings, since anything applied to the paper could melt in the printer, ruining the sheet and, potentially, the printer. One example could be a sheet of labels designed for laser printers that have a wax backing paper that is covered, to prevent the wax from melting.
  • The main difference between inkjet and laser papers is the self-weeding capability of laser papers that inkjet papers do not have.
  • A laser heat transfer paper is considered revolutionary due to its self-weeding (or no cutting) capability. With white toner printers available in the market, there are limitless options. Self-weeding papers give the option to design limitless details without the fear of weeding or cutting the design.

SIMILARITIES IN THE KINDS OF PAPER USED IN INKJET VS LASER PRINTERS


THE DIFFERENCE FOR PAPER THAT WORKS IN BOTH

  • Some papers can be used in both types of printers and have special features. These often have a ColorLok seal with "chemical properties that separate the liquid from the colorant in ink, leaving the colorant on the paper’s surface and sucking the liquid away". This helps enhance print quality in inkjet printers, while the lower dust and friction in these papers "extend the life of laser printers".
  • Also, the copy paper may be applied to a diversity of purposes since it is created to withstand the harshness of different printers.
  • For the office papers that can be used in both printers (inkjet and laser), the difference in quality is evident. A laser printer usually generates excellent image quality on any type of paper. Inkjet printers can do a better job when printing on general-purpose paper, although, it may not be the best choice when printing quality needs utmost importance.
Part
03
of four
Part
03

ColorLok

ColorLok technology is used on printer-specific papers. Papers with ColorLok technology can be used with inkjet and laser printers.

COLORLOK PAPERS BEING USED WITH INKJET AND LASER PRINTERS

  • The ColorLok technology is used by paper manufacturers to produce products that offer the “best possible digital prints.”
  • ColorLok-certified papers are not suitable for industrial and commercial printing.
  • They can only be used with inkjet and laser printers in a home or office environment.
  • For both types of printers, papers with ColorLok technology provide benefits such as high reliability, reliable for paper pick, and consistent printing performance.
  • The benefits specific to inkjet printers include bolder black printing, more vivid colors, faster drying, and improved duplex printing.
  • The benefits specific to laser printers include fewer electrical defects for better print quality, longer service life, and print quality protection over the life of the printers.
  • Brands that offer paper products with ColorLok technology in the United States include Antalis, Boise Paper, Copamex, Domtar, HP, International Paper, Mac Papers, Magnum, MultiQue, New England Office Supply, Office Depot, Quill, Sam's Club, Staples, Suzano, Universal, W.B. Mason, and Xerox.
  • The paper types available include inkjet, laser, multipurpose, and recycled.
Part
04
of four
Part
04

Innovations in Print Paper

Three of the most recent innovations in the printer paper industry include interactive paper, synthetic paper, and rewritable paper.

INTERACTIVE PAPER

Overview

Impact

Leading Companies

SYNTHETIC PAPER

Overview

Impact

Leading Companies

  • Ricoh has been successfully implementing synthetic paper into their company, starting with a 50% synthetic paper blend in 2002 and increasing that blend to 70% currently.

REPRINTABLE PAPER

Overview

Impact

  • Reprintable paper impacts the environmental and sustainability problems that come with producing paper products.
  • The reprintable paper can be recycled without first having to be processed at a recycling facility, helping postpone the deforestation of about 35% of worldwide trees.

Leading Companies

  • Xerox is one of the first companies with plans to mass-produce reprintable paper.
  • Their paper lasts 16-24 hours before automatically returning to a blank sheet of paper.
  • The University of California, in collaboration with Wenshou Wang at Shandong University in China, has created a reprintable printer paper that can be printed on up to 80 times and is reaching out to companies about getting this paper into the mass markets.
Sources
Sources