Make Poverty History

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Make Poverty History

On January 1st, 2005, the "Make Poverty History"(MPH) campaign was launched in the United Kingdom and other parts the world with a unique Vicar of Dibley New Year's Day program introducing the idea of ant revealing why people need to mobilize. Coalition members in the United Kingdom agreed that MPH as a formally structured coalition should last just for one year and within the time frame, MPH evolved into the most significant (biggest) cause-related branding success story throughout history. The campaign had 85% name recognition and sold over 8 million branded white bands. Unfortunately, the MPH campaign has fail to eradicate poverty as implied in its name as a "creation or entrenchment of new classes of poor" continue to occur.

SOME REASONS WHY "MAKE POVERTY HISTORY" CAMPAIGN IS A SUCCESS

  • One of the successes stories of the MPH campaign reveals that the United Kingdom coalition for the "Make Poverty History" campaign rapidly grew, and over 540 organizations were represented. Participation of members of the United Kingdom public eventually exceeded all expectations. Barely after six months, about 87% of the United Kingdoms population was already aware of the campaign.
  • Trade Union Congress publicized the campaign to affiliate members and set formed a special "Trade Union Working Group" required to meet and receive email updates a minimum of once a month during the campaign duration and by summer of 2005, more than 30 unions were MPH Coalition members.
  • Within one year of launch, MPH evolved into the most significant (biggest) cause-related branding success throughout history. The campaign had 85% name recognition and sold over 8 million branded white bands.

REASONS FOR LIMITATIONS IN THE SUCCESS OF THE "MAKE POVERTY HISTORY" CAMPAIGN

  • The mission statement of the MPH campaign matched its name as it aimed to raise awareness and end global poverty. However, the Australian Online Opinion web publication in an article titled "Poor campaigns fail the poor" reveals that the Make Poverty History campaign witnessed some failures because it was "set up for long-term disappointment."
  • The Australian Online Opinion web publication further reveals that poverty is an absolute and at the same time, a relative term — therefore, it will always exist with humanity. Some absolutes of poverty such as particular diseases, immediate famine, barriers to sustainable development, and several circumstances of poor people. However, the fight against poverty, which is also an abstract noun, as seen in the case of the Make Poverty History campaign will always fail.
  • The archived opinion of Ken Burnett, a writer, publisher, and an occasional fundraising consultant reveals that the Make Poverty History campaign did not succeed in "changing political agendas, far less in eradicating poverty."
  • For several residents of non-G8 nations, the Make Poverty History campaign lead to "more immediate disappointments" as there has been a "creation or entrenchment of new classes of poor" even after the campaign.

POVERTY DID NOT END WITH THE "MAKE POVERTY HISTORY" CAMPAIGN

  • A 2017 extreme-poverty report published by Our World In Data reveals that the total population of the world living in extreme poverty, declined from 1.9 billion approximations of 1990 to about 0.73 billion in 2015. However, in Sub-Saharan Africa cases of people living in extreme poverty has increased within the same time frame and Africa currently has the highest number of people living in poverty.
  • Detailed research reveals that extreme poverty still exists and was contrary to the mission statement of Make Poverty History.
  • About 383 million people in Africa currently live in extreme poverty.
  • About 327 million people in Asia currently live in extreme poverty.
  • About 19 million people in South America currently live in extreme poverty.
  • About 13 million people in North America currently live in extreme poverty.
  • About 2.5 million people in Oceania currently live in extreme poverty.
  • About 0.7 million people in Europe currently live in extreme poverty.

METHODOLOGY

Our research team scoured through recent press releases, expert reviews and interviews, and credible media publication such as Forbes among others for analysis on perceived reasons the 'Make Poverty History' Campaign in the UK and Ireland did not have great success. Unfortunately, there was not recent publication with a precompiled report that sufficiently gave the insights required. Since the campaign was launched in 2005, we expanded our scope to look into resources outside the usual 24-month credibility range so as not to miss any vital insight. A Forbes publication on MHC revealed how some people now patronize goods from developing countries due to the impact of the Make Poverty History campaign.

Detailed research through professional association websites including a Trades Union Congress (TUC) web publication failed to uncover precompiled information on perceived reasons the 'Make Poverty History' Campaign in the UK and Ireland did not have great success. However, a triangulation attempt by researching for some recognized/partial achievements of the MHC campaign revealed that barely after six months, about 87% of the United Kingdoms population was already aware of the campaign. We considered this and other similar insights to be some evidence or aspects of the success of the MHC campaign.

Further research through research articles such as scholarly and academic publications such as Research Gate Journals retrospected on the effect of the Make Poverty History campaign on Africa but failed to analyze the reasons the 'Make Poverty History' Campaign in the UK and Ireland did not have great success. We decided to implement another triangulation by attempting to research for the failures or shortcomings of the MHC campaign in the UK and Ireland to determine why it did not have great success. Insights obtained from researching through an Online Opinion web revealed that the Make Poverty History campaign witnessed some failures because it was "set up for long-term disappointment." The publication also went on to explain that the fight against poverty, which is also an abstract noun, as seen in the case of the Make Poverty History campaign will always fail. Another insight obtained from the archived opinion of Ken Burnett, a writer, publisher, and an occasional fundraising consultant revealed that the Make Poverty History campaign did not succeed in "changing political agendas, far less in eradicating poverty." We assumed these insights among others to be some reasons the "Make Poverty History" Campaign in the UK and Ireland did not have great success.

Finally, we researched through global poverty statistics to verify with available data if the Make Poverty History campaign succeeded in ending poverty. Insights obtained through Our World In Data web and accredited the World Bank reveals that extreme poverty continues to thrive in certain parts of the world including Africa (Congo, Nigeria), and Asia (India), etc. We assumed this to be an indication that the Make Poverty History campaign may not be considered a complete success since it has not succeeded in ending poverty historically as the campaign name and mission statement suggests.
Sources
Sources

Quotes
  • "Make Poverty History (MPH) is staging a worldwide campaign. Its mission statement matches its name as it aims to raise awareness about global poverty and make concrete policy changes in various nations’ governments and in intergovernmental organizations. The various national Make Poverty History campaigns are part of a larger international campaign called Global Call to Action Against Poverty, a worldwide alliance committed to making world leaders live up to their promises and ending global poverty."
  • "The Admirable Aims of Make Poverty History In comparison to other aid organizations that may struggle trying to apply single, cure-all strategies on a universal scale, MPH has experienced such widespread success because each participating country can focus its national campaign on different issues within the broader topic of alleviating global poverty. Despite these slight variations, however, all countries generally focus on issues such as aid, trade, and justice that are relevant to the UN’s eight Millennium Development Goals. Besides alleviating global poverty, MPH also aims to reduce the corruption that plagues many developing countries’ governments and prevents foreign aid from reaching the poorest members of society. For example, the British MPH campaign is a coalition of charities, religious organizations, trade unions, and celebrities whose campaign slogans include “trade justice,” “drop the debt,” and “more and better aid.”"
  • "The call for “trade justice” demands a global trade system that does not allow half of the world’s population to live on less than $2 USD per day. This aspect of the campaign seeks to prevent the wealthiest countries and individuals from reaping all of the trade benefits at the expense of the impoverished. Meanwhile, the “drop the debt” aspect of the campaign suggests canceling unpayable debt of the world’s poorest countries without cutting these countries off to the prospect of future aid. This includes creating a fair and transparent international process to ensure that human needs take priority over debt repayments ."
Quotes
  • "The ambitious proposition explicit in the Make Poverty History campaign may not yet have succeeded in changing political agendas, far less in eradicating poverty. But it has certainly captured the public’s hearts and minds."
  • "In record time Make Poverty History has become a bigger brand than all the individual charities and development agencies put together. After less than one year it has evolved into the biggest cause-related branding success ever, with 85 per cent name recognition and more than 8 million white bands sold."
  • "Archived opinions from Ken Burnett, writer, publisher and occasional fundraising consultant."
Quotes
  • "Make Poverty History was always going to be a campaign set up for long-term disappointment. Poverty is both an absolute and a relative term - it will always be with us. We can tackle some of the absolutes: immediate famine, particular diseases, barriers to sustainable development and the circumstances of the poor. But we will always lose a fight against an abstract noun. Now even the abstraction of poverty has been blown away for a while, and terrorism has returned as the abstract noun du jour. For those of us who live in non-G8 nations, Make Poverty History is a campaign leading to much more immediate disappointment. The hard slog of addressing the Australian Government’s contribution to global poverty, and the creation or entrenchment of new classes of poor in Australia is one with which overseas aid agencies are still to re-engage."
Quotes
  • "Make Poverty History was launched in the UK and around the world on 1st January 2005 with a special Vicar of Dibley New Year's Day programme introducing the idea of forthcoming July rally in Edinburgh and why people need to mobilise."
  • "The UK coalition rapidly grew, representing over 540 organisations, and the massive participation of the UK public exceeded all expectations. After just six months, 87% of the UK population had heard about the campaign."
  • "In order to coordinate trade union activities and disseminate information, the TUC set about heavily publicising the campaign to its affiliates and set up a special 'Trade Union Working Group' which met and received email updates at least once a month. By the summer, over 30 unions had become MPH Coalition members. In July, when the UK hosted the G8 summit, an astonishing 225,000 people rallied in Edinburgh to demand the G8 leaders Make Poverty History. The day before, millions around the world wore white bands and lobbied their own governments in solidarity with the global poor. The G8 achieved a measure of success, particularly in the areas of aid and debt but these did not go far enough and there was no movement on trade justice, nor workers rights - the two most crucial areas for trade unionists."
  • "On 10 September, people from all over the world - Bangladesh to Spain, the Congo to New York and El Salvador to Japan gave their voices to ask world leaders to 'Wake Up to Poverty' on white band day II. View images from events around the world "
  • "However, despite including good references to the importance of decent work and workers rights, Make Poverty History was very disappointed in the outcome of the UN Summit for the world's poor. In early December, the future prospects of millions of people in the developing and developed world was in the hands of a gathering of trade ministers when the crucial World Trade Organisation Ministerial took place in Hong Kong. Trade unionists joined other campaigners in lobbying our Government to play their role in bringing an end to poverty through fairer trade rules and respecting workers' rights and the environment at the WTO. The WTO outcomes were less inspiring with multilateral negotiations just about kept going but no mention of issues of key concern to trade unionists such as the impact of trade agreements on employment and labour standards and some 'progress' that if left unchecked could have a devastating impact on industry in the global south"