Please detail the market opportunity for electric vehicle charging points relating to regulations in the UK which have been both proposed or enacted within the past three months as well as those set to go into effect within the next 12 months.

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Please detail the market opportunity for electric vehicle charging points relating to regulations in the UK which have been both proposed or enacted within the past three months as well as those set to go into effect within the next 12 months.

Hello! Thanks for your question about the market opportunity for electric vehicle charging points, as it relates to regulations in the UK that have been proposed or enacted within the past three months as well as those set to go into effect within the next twelve months. The short version is that the UK is facing a problem of air pollution, and its government is working to pass new laws and policies to reduce harmful emissions and to decrease the use of diesel cars. Below you will find a deep dive of my finding.

AIR POLLUTION IN THE UK

Local authorities in the UK have identified at least 717 air quality management areas that do not meet the EU's requirements for pollutant concentration. These areas range from small stretches of road to entire boroughs. The greatest source of pollution is road transport. It affects 86% of air quality areas. The government is working on changes in the law to discourage the most polluting vehicles while encouraging modes of transport that are the least polluting.

GOVERNMENT'S EFFORTS TO RID THE UK OF AIR POLLUTION

Recently, the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan implemented a £10 toxicity "T-Charge" for the oldest and most polluting cars on the city's roads. The new regulation will be enforced on October 23, 2017. Today, over 9,000 Londoners die from long-term exposure to pollutants in the air, and 438 schools in London are in places that exceed the legal air quality levels established by the EU. The Mayor has doubled the funding (£875 million) to be used on this initiative over the next five years. Another £300 million will be used on clean buses.

A scrappage scheme, supported by the government, could take 15,000 Euro 1-5 diesel cars (and Euro 1-3 petrol cars with EVs) off the roads by 2019. This plan would require the help of a £8,000 grant. The plan hopes to reduce nitrogen dioxide levels in the UK. In addition to these changes, diesel vehicles could also face more expensive charges when it comes to Vehicle Excise Duty (VED).

Most of the plans being considered today by authorities focus on a series of Clean Air Zones. These zones would charge some cars--those that fall bellow the minimum emission standards--for entry. The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), has commented that it is preferable for authorities not to charge motorists.

Each of the major parties in the UK has put out a manifesto with respect to the issue of emissions and air pollution. The Labour party wants to make the UK a leading figure in the creation and manufacture of low-emission vehicles. These include models like the Toyota Prius, the Lexus RX, the Toyota C-HR, and the Hyundai Ioniq. It also includes electric cars like the BMW i3, the Nissan Leaf, and Renault Zoe. The Conservative party will focus on research for the development of zero-emission cars. Its 25-year environment plan will work on improving roads. The Lib Dems party plans to establish a Green Transport Act, which will support low-emission cars. The Green Party plans to use incentives to take diesel vehicles off the roads. Plaid Cymru will focus on railways and roads. The SNP will implement a fuel duty regulator to resist the financial burden of filling up a car in the UK.

Since January 1, 2017, London has a law that requires new taxi vehicles to be zero-emission capable. The London Taxi Company (which is owned by the China-based firm Geely) has invested approximately £300 million for a new manufacturing facility and for the development of a London electric taxi. It is also working on a range-extended electric light commercial van.

CRITICISM OF GOVERNMENT

In light of the large amount of evidence against the use of diesel vehicles, the government finds itself pressured to pass a scrappage scheme, but taxing motorists is an unpopular option. Many of the government's proposals are seen as weak and diffident by those in politics and in related industries. Many state that the government's policies are "toothless and woefully inadequate."

A draft plan concerning air pollution is expected to be published soon. It will explain how the government will tackle the high level of air pollution in the UK. There is a feeling in government that a strong policy will have to be launched to persuade people to give up their diesel cars.

CONCLUSION

To wrap it up, the UK is facing a problem of air pollution, and its government is working to pass new laws and policies to reduce harmful emissions and to decrease the use of diesel cars. Thanks for using Wonder! Please let us know if we can help with anything else!
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