Phase 2 Financial Services Innovation Project

Part
01
of 42
Part
01

Conversational Commerce - Rows 2-9

Conversational commerce is a term that was introduced by Uber's Chris Messina in 2015. In an article for Medium, Messina used the phrase to describe the utilization of messaging apps to provide concierge-style services. The requested information has been included in the attached spreadsheet under the Conversational Commerce tab, Rows 2-9.

FINDINGS
A general Google search for the term 'conversational commerce' yields 6,660,000 results, and we found that when filtering by the dates of January 1, 2017–December 31, 2017, the results decreased to 146,000. The number of TechCrunch articles available containing the term 'conversational commerce' is 4,862.

The term 'conversational commerce' reached its peak search index in the United States in November 2016. As of the date of this research (January 13, 2018) the relative index is 63.

CONCLUSION
In conclusion, the phrase 'conversational commerce' was introduced by Chris Messina in 2015 to describe businesses' use of messaging apps to provide individualized, concierge-style services to their consumers. All the information requested regarding the topic of conversational commerce has been included in the attached spreadsheet.

Part
02
of 42
Part
02

Invisible Payments - Rows 2-9

We have updated the relevant rows within the attached spreadsheet as requested. Please see below additional notes regarding our findings.

FINDINGS

Most of the requested information was available via relatively straightforward searches performed through the relevant mediums (TechCrunch, Google, etc.). Our findings are described within the attached spreadsheet. Note that regarding the technology history of invisible payments (rows 2 and 3), we performed custom searches to determine the years that "invisible payments" as related to the mobile payment concepts began appearing in search results and news sources. Also note that there was not enough data available from Google Trends related to the "invisible payments" search term.

CONCLUSION

We have updated the requested invisible payments technology history information within the attached spreadsheet.
Part
03
of 42
Part
03

Distributed Ledger Technology - Rows 2-9

Block chain technology was created to support Bitcoin (which appeared in 2008) and serves as the underlying technology for Distributed Ledger Technology. Bitcoin's inventor is named as Satoshi Nakamoto, likely an alias for one or more people that worked on its creation. While no inventor is named for Distributed Ledger Technology specifically, related technologies and research in digital currencies had been in the works for several decades prior to its debt. Further details on the prominence of Distributed Ledger Technology can be found in the attached spreadsheet.

PROMINENCE

The reputation of Bitcoin changed in or around 2014, at which point it began gaining prominence as viable in financial services. Prior to that time, it was stigmatized by illegal and unregulated behaviors, propelled by the anonymous nature of its users.

The Journal published by the Capco Institute notes that interest in Bitcoin and block chain technologies dates back to 2014, when the Bank of England first published an article about it in their quarterly bulletin.

PATENTS

According to Marshall Gerstein, there were 879 patent filings mentioning the terms "bitcoin, block chain or distributed ledger" from October 31, 2008 to February 16, 2017. These results include both issued patents and published patent applications. However, the search I conducted through the U.S. Patent Office turned up a total of 354 patents. The difference is likely attributable to both the different time frame, and the discrepancy between issued patents and published applications in the pipeline.


CONCLUSION

To wrap up, Distributed Ledger Technology (which uses block chain technology) was founded on or after 2008, the date attributed to the founding of Bitcoin. Bitcoin and associated technologies began gaining prominence in legitimate financial circles about 2013-14. Further details can be found on the attached spreadsheet.





Part
04
of 42
Part
04

Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality - Rows 2-9

An augmented reality/virtual reality device, called the 'Sentorama', was first invented in 1957 by Morton Heilig as a multimedia application tasked to create an interactive theater experience. The invention was subsequently patented in 1962. Nowadays, according to a report by Sonoda and Kobayashi, there are 3111 patented AR/VR devices globally from which 1,714 are in the US. TechCrunch alone contains over 4,058 articles on augmented reality and virtual reality and the total google hits amount to over 3,522,100,000. Moreover, according to Google trends, the peak search index for AR occurred in March 2004, whereas the peak search index for VR occurred on December 2016. When it comes to financial services, 2016 was the year in which financial institutions started talking about the benefits and future implementation of these technologies in the field. All the information can be found in rows 2-9, columns F-I, in the attached spreadsheet.

METHODOLOGY

In order to provide you with information about innovation concerning AR/VR in the financial sector, we searched through trusted media sites, industry reports, and used specific tools such as Google trends and Biznar Deep Web. In order to provide you with the total and recent number of hits in Google, as well as the total number of articles regarding AR/VR in TechCrunch, the following keywords were used:

#augmented reality
#virtual reality
#AR
#VR

The total number of patents were found using the keywords above + "AND patents" which led us to a report by Sonoda and Kobayashi.

CONCLUSION

To wrap it up, all the information regarding AR/VR data points in financial services can be found in rows 2-9, columns F-I, in the attached spreadsheet.
Part
05
of 42
Part
05

Omnichannel - Rows 2-9

Introduction and Methodology

The information requested was all found precompiled by various sources. The Google Trends, search numbers, and amount of Tech Crunch articles were directly available through a repeatable process. However, the data on when omnichannel was first mentioned required some inferences. We found that the first rumblings of the idea occurred in 2010 but the term was coined in 2011. However, the term remained dormant until smartphones made the idea of omnichannel more appealing. By 2014, the first mentions of omnichannel in the financial sector were being reported on by publications.

Conclusion

The requested spreadsheet contains everything asked for in a direct manner. However, if more research is required the sources list contain much more detailed information delving into the omnichannel term.

Part
06
of 42
Part
06

Biometrics - Rows 2-9

Biometrics refers to the measurement and analysis of unique physical or behavioral characteristics (such as fingerprint or voice patterns) used as a means of verifying personal identity." It was first used in 1858 by Sir William Herschel who worked for the Civil Service of India. Each worker’s handprint was recorded on the back of their contracts to verify their identity when claiming their pay. The United States registered 3,079 patents pertaining to biometrics as of 2008. Our findings are detailed in the attached spreadsheet.

Findings

The first documented use of biometrics was in 1858 and was used by Sir William Herschel. While working for the Civil Service of India, he noted a problem with people showing up to claim paychecks that were not theirs. He recorded each employee’s handprint on the back of their contract as a means to verify their identity. It was the first recorded instance of systematic capture of finger and hand images for identification.

The United States registered 3,079 biometric patents as of 2008.

Discussions about using biometrics in the financial sector were first documented in 2002. A large group of savings banks in Germany (the SIZ) decided not to replace personal identification numbers with fingerprints to authenticate ATM withdrawals because of problems with the technology. They discovered through studies that approximately 5-10 people out of 100 would not be able to get their money because of the unreliability of biometrics at the time.

With extensive research for media prominence, we found a total number of 35 articles “tagged” with the term “Biometric.” 13,800,000 search results show up with the term “Biometrics.” and there were about 4,630,000 search results specifically for 2017.

Conclusion

The use of biometrics was first recorded in 1858 by Sir William Herschel. While working for the Civil Service of India, he recorded the worker's fingerprints on the back of their contracts to verify their identity before payment. As of 2008, the United States registered 3,079 biometric patents. These details, and more, can be found on the attached spreadsheet.

Part
07
of 42
Part
07

Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning - Rows 2-9

As requested, all information is in the attached spreadsheet, as requested. Below you find a deep dive into my findings:

Row 2:
Column F: Artificial Intelligence(AI) was invented in 1956. Machine Learning was invented in 1959.

Column G: The term Artificial Intelligence was coined by computer scientist John McCarthy in 1955. In 1956, McCarthy organized Dartmouth Summer Research Project on Artificial Intelligence, which is now widely recognize as the origin of AI.
"Machine Learning has been around since 1959 when IBM’s own Arthur Samuel coined it".

Column H and I: Sources: "AI, Machine Learning and Deep Learning: Is There Really a Difference?" at Medium.com and "Artificial Intelligence: A Policy-Oriented Introduction" at wilsoncenter.org.

Row 3:
Column F:The year is not specifically stated. However, the Financial Stability Board report titled, "Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Financial Services" states that recent increases in computing power coupled with increases in the availability and quantity of data have resulted in a resurgence of interest in potential applications of artificial intelligence. These applications include medical diagnosis, language translations and are increasingly being used in the financial sector as well.

Column G: There are no exact details however, the above mentioned report states that in 2011 and 2012 major tech companies began to acquire deep learning start-ups and rapidly accelerate deep learning research. Also new is the scale of collection of big data, for example the ability to capture data on the scale of every single credit card transaction or every word on the web. AI and Machine Learning have also been used to feed client data into large algorithms to access credit quality and thus price loan contracts.

Column H/I:"Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Financial Services: Market Developments and Financial Stability Implications" at fsb.org.

Row 4:
Column F: There are 47,132 patents in the US.
Column G: Keywords used:

Row 5:
Column F: Number of articles on TechCrunch: AI: 2690 results and 5882 results for Machine Learning for a total of 8572 results.
Column G: Keywords used: Machine learning, Artificial intelligence, articles
Column H/I: Techcrunch.com

Row 6:
Column F: Number of search result: 245,000,000
Column G: Keywords used: Machine learning or Artificial intelligence
Column H/I: Google

Row 7:
Column F: Number of search results in 2017: 17,700,000
Column G: Keywords used: Machine learning or Artificial intelligence (time specified)
Column H/I: Google
Row 8: Column F: November 2017 (machine learning)
Feb 2004 (artificial intelligence)
Column G: Keywords: machine learning, artificial intelligence, peak search index
Column H/I: Google trends
Row 9:
Column F: AI-62 and Machine Learning-92
Column G: Keywords: machine learning, artificial intelligence, peak search index
Column H/I: Google trends




Part
08
of 42
Part
08

Conversational Commerce - Rows 10-22

We have updated the relevant rows within the attached spreadsheet as requested. Please see below additional notes regarding our findings.

findings

We researched news sources and press releases related to the relevant companies' launches of social media accounts, as "conversational commerce" is defined within the research criteria. Following exhaustive research, we determined that official press releases regarding social media account launches was not available. In order to determine this information, we searched for news releases and examined the companies' Facebook and Twitter pages to determine the dates they joined the social media services. We also located numerous official press releases related to companies' social media efforts which we have outlined in spreadsheet row 22 as required.

conclusion

Most of the relevant companies have produced official press releases regarding their social media accounts. We have defined the earliest social media launch dates as available via public sources within the attached spreadsheet.
Part
09
of 42
Part
09

Invisible Payments - Rows 10-22

OVERVIEW

While the UK was the first country to adopt the contactless technology widely, the first companies to use the technology are US based companies Chase and HSBC. Europe started widely seeing the contactless technology in 2007, and the US did not see wide use until Apple Pay came out in 2011. The information is compiled into the attached spreadsheet in Rows 10-22, columns F-I.

FINDINGS

In researching, we found that invisible payments are frequently referred to as contactless technology at many major banking companies. The UK started the contactless technology trend with Barclays in 2007, and from there the technology took off in Europe with most companies adopting it by 2013. Barclays coming out with their Barclaycard OnePulse forced many merchants to upgrade their payment methods to include this type of technology. One of the last European banks to integrate the technology was Santander in 2014.

In the US the first use of the technology could be seen with Chase and HSBC in 2005, but most merchants could not accept these payments until closer to 2011 in the US. Chase created a system called Blink that used NFC phones to transmit information for contactless payments starting in 2005, but this was replaced by Apple Pay and similar programs in 2011. The rise of Apple Pay in use spurred Synchrony Bank and Intuit to get in on the action. Synchrony partnered with Apple Pay while Intuit tried to create an app. In 2017 the rest of the companies joined in on contactless technology and started reissuing cards to their members with their updated technology.

Simple Bank was the only listed company that had no mention of invisible payments or contactless technology in their press releases or on their website. The attached spreadsheet has links to various press releases documenting when the different competitors first started using contactless technology options.

CONCLUSION

Contactless technology started being widely used in the UK in 2007 and while the US would not see widespread use until Apple Pay comes around even though Chase and HSBC were the first companies to offer this type of technology. By 2011 most European companies had the technology in use on their cards, and as of 2017, there is a major push in the US to integrate the technology everywhere. The information is entered, as requested, into the attached spreadsheet Rows 10-22, Columns F-I.
Part
10
of 42
Part
10

Distributed Ledger Technology - Rows 10-22

In terms of when the 12 banks in rows 10-21 of the "Distributed Ledger Technology" tab of the attached spreadsheet entered the distributed ledger technology space, Barclays entered in 9/2016, American Express in 1/2017, TD Bank in 7/2017, Chase in 2/2016, Citi Bank in 5/2017, Capital One in 10/2016, Wells Fargo in 10/2016, HSBC in 10/2017, Santander in 11/2015, Simple Bank/BBVA Compass in 6/2017, MINT/Intuit in 8/2016, and Synchrony Bank in 10/2016. All requested details, including entry date, description of the press release, and source title have been entered into rows 10-21 on the "Distributed Ledger Technology" tab of the attached spreadsheet. Row 22 shows that all 12 competitors listed in rows 10-21 have made announcements about when they began exploring distributed ledger technology.

I was unable to find any press releases regarding the entry of Simple Bank into the distributed ledger technology space, but its partner bank, BBVA Compass announced it was entering the space in June 2017, when it joined the "SWIFT gpi blockchain proof of concept" [sic], along with 22 other companies.

All press releases are the earliest available for each bank. Please note that while all banks made announcements about exploring distributed ledger technology, not all press releases were published by the companies themselves. Several, including American Express, TD Bank, HSBC, and Simple Bank/BBVA Compass issued press releases through their partners (Hyperledger, Chamber of Digital Commerce, Finastra, and Swift). In addition, Chase, Capital One, Wells Fargo, and MINT/Intuit announced their entry through third parties, including CCN, Nasdaq, Coindesk, and MarketWired by Nasdaq. I was unable to find the corresponding press releases from the companies themselves.

Conclusion

Of the 12 banks listed in rows 10-21 of the "Distributed Ledger Technology" tab of the spreadsheet, the first one to enter the distributed ledger technology was Santander, when, in November 2015, it issued a challenge to startups and offered a $15,000 prize for creating "innovative applications for using distributed ledger (DL) and blockchain technologies to improve the processes and operation of the banking industry."
Part
11
of 42
Part
11

Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality - Rows 10-22

The requested data for Row 10-22 and Column F-I in the “Augmented Reality/VR” tab has been compiled into the attached spreadsheet. No source provides required data for TD Bank, CHASE, Capital One, and Simple Bank.
FINDINGS
All requested details, including entry date, description of the press release, source title, and source links have been entered into row 10-21 on the “Augmented Reality/VR” tab of the attached spreadsheet. Row 22 shows integrated data of companies who have made announcements about when they began exploring Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality technology. All press releases are the earliest available for each bank. Please note that while the banks who made announcements about exploring Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality, not all press releases were published by the companies themselves. No source provided any press releases or information regarding the entry of TD Bank, Chase, Capital One, and Simple Bank into the Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality space.
CONCLUSION
In conclusion, 7 out of 12 companies have made announcements about their entry into the AR/VR space. While Mint/Intuit didn’t actually adopt this technology so far though, they released an article on their website featuring the future of the latest technologies including Augmented Reality which shows they may implement it in near future.

Part
12
of 42
Part
12

Omnichannel - Rows 10-22

Barclays is the first bank of the 12 that announced its involvement in the omnichannel space, when it "its first flagship Brand concept branch in UK" in December 2009. The most recent bank to enter into the space is Chase, when in October 2017, it announced Finn, its new smartphone app that allows users to open a bank account in areas where Chase does not have branches. Simple Bank has not entered the omnichannel space because it is an online-only bank. All details for the 12 banks have been entered in rows 10-21 of the "Omnichannel" tab of the attached spreadsheet.

Methodology

To determine the earliest date each of the 12 banks has entered the omnichannel space, I searched for press releases and media mentions of each bank's omnichannel activities. In two cases, Wells Fargo and Santander, the press releases came from the banks themselves. American Express' announcement came from its partner in omnichannel technology, Oracle + Netsuite. For all other banks, except Simple Bank, the announcements came from third-party articles.

Simple Bank does not appear to have entered the omnichannel space at all. This is likely because it is an online-only bank, so it intentionally does not have omnichannel functionality. However, its services are available through both website and mobile applications. I did not find any indication that mobile and website apps are considered multichannel, so I did not include a press release for Simple Bank on the spreadsheet.

Based on the research above, 11 of the 12 banks in rows 10-21 have entered the omnichannel space to some degree and have either released announcements to that effect or their activities within the space have been covered by industry articles. This information has been entered in row 22 of the "Omnichannel" tab of the attached spreadsheet.

Conclusion

Of the 12 banks analyzed, only Simple Bank has not entered the omnichannel space, as it is an online-only bank. Barclays made the first omnichannel announcement in December 2009, followed by American Express, Wells Fargo, and TD Bank in 2015; Capital One, Santander, Synchrony Bank, HBSC, and Mint/Intuit in 2016; and Citibank and Chase in 2017.
Part
13
of 42
Part
13

Biometrics - Rows 10-22

We have updated the relevant rows within the attached spreadsheet as requested. Please see below additional notes regarding our findings.

FINDINGS

We researched press releases related to the relevant companies' earliest mentions of biometrics efforts. When press releases related to biometrics were not available, we included news sources related to the companies' biometrics endeavors. Following exhaustive research, we confirmed that there was no public information available related to Mint/Intuit's use of biometrics.

CONCLUSION

Only HSBC and Synchrony have produced official press releases related to biometrics. We have defined the biometrics space entrance dates as available via public sources within the attached spreadsheet.
Part
14
of 42
Part
14

Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning - Rows 10-22

This research provided press release information for competitor banks and their first entrance into the space of artificial intelligence (AI)/machine learning. The banks reviewed include Barclays, American Express, TD Bank, CHASE, CitiBank, Capital One, WellsFargo, HSBC, Santander, Simple Bank, Mint, and Synchrony Bank. The earliest press release related to a company's activities in the AI/machine learning arena was published by Simple Bank in 2010. Nine competitors had relevant press releases. Synchrony Bank, Mint, and Santander released no press statements related to AI or machine learning topics.

Complete details about each press release and all other requested information (e.g., descriptions, source names, dates, and sources) are presented in rows 10-22, columns F-I of the AI/Machine Learning tab within the attached spreadsheet.
Part
15
of 42
Part
15

Conversation Commerce - Rows 23-46

TD Bank, Citi Bank, and Wells Fargo have all made investments in conversational commerce technology and startups. Despite extensive searching, I could not find evidence that any of the other financial institutions mentioned have invested in or acquired companies in this space. As requested, I've populated rows 23 to 46 of the spreadsheet with the relevant information, and you'll also find a brief mention of my findings below.

findings

- TD Bank adopted conversational commerce technology in collaboration with Kasisto.

- Citi Bank invested $2 million in the startup LiveNinja.

- Kasisto graduated from the Wells Fargo Startup Accelerator, and the accelerator also invested $2.25 million in the startup.

conclusion

To wrap up, Wells Fargo, Citi Bank and TD Bank have all made investments in conversational commerce technology and startups.
Part
16
of 42
Part
16

Invisible Payments - Rows 23-46

As requested, all relevant information has been added to the spreadsheet for rows 23-46.

METHODOLOGY

Unfortunately, many of the banks have not made public investments in companies that facilitate invisible payments. When I did find record of an investment in invisible payments companies, I ran into difficulty finding the amount of the investment. Press releases and news stories lumped all investors in a particular round into one figure, not identifying how much that specific bank may have invested.

I also looked for internal investments, but my deep dive yielded no results in the public domain, nor did relevant annual reports isolate any specific investment in invisible payment mechanisms. Therefore, despite the best efforts, very little data was available with regard to exact figures of investment in invisible payments.

I was able to find more definitive information regarding acquisitions. Of all the banks listed on the spreadsheet, only Chase had an acquisitions related to invisible payments: WePay and MCX Payments.

conclusion

In conclusion, please find rows 23-46 completed on the attached spreadsheet.

Part
17
of 42
Part
17

Distributed Ledger Technology - Rows 23-46

We have completed rows 23-46, columns F-I of the attached spreadsheet as requested. For rows 23-34, we outlined the amount of money each company has invested in the space, however, most of the companies invested with a group of other investors and the exact amount invested by each company isn't available. In terms of acquisitions, none of the institutions have acquired companies from the distributed ledger or blockchain technology domain. Below you will find more information.

METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS

Distribute ledger is powered by blockchain technology, so we searched for investment and acquisitions made by the listed companies in distributed ledger or blockchain technology. For rows 23-34, we searched for the investment made by each of the listed company in the distributed ledger or blockchain technology space. For companies that have made such investment, we added all the investment made and reported it in column F. However, for the majority of these companies, the exact investment made isn't publicly available so we only reported the total amount raised together with other investors.
For companies we couldn't find any evidence of investment in the space, we assumed that they have not made any such investment and reported zero dollar in column F.
In terms of acquisitions, none of the listed companies have made any acquisition in the space. We confirmed this by searching thoroughly for any report or press release of such acquisition, as well as by researching all the acquisitions made by each company reported by Crunchbase to see if any of the acquired company was in the distributed ledger or blockchain technology space. Our research confirmed that no such acquisition has been made by any of the listed company. We have listed all relevant sources in the spreadsheet. You can access the spreadsheet here.

CONCLUSION

To wrap up, we have completed rows 23-46, columns F-I of the attached spreadsheet as requested.

Part
18
of 42
Part
18

Augmented Reality/VR - Rows 23-46

There is a lingering confusion between augmented reality and virtual reality, but the difference is major and worth clearing up. Augmented reality takes our current environment (reality) and adds something to it while virtual reality transposes the user, bringing him or her elsewhere. There is a growing hunger for AR/VR and the hype has been visible in the investment landscape where “deals exploded by 60% in Q1’17.”
Our research revealed that Barclays Bank, American Express, TD Bank, JP Morgan Chase, Citi Bank, Wells Fargo, HSBC Bank, Santander Bank and Mint/Intuit Bank are interested in the AR/VR space. However, after an extensive research, we determined that the information available is inadequate in showing the amounts invested or whether there have been acquisitions made by the companies. This is that the AR/VR market is dominated by start-ups who are competing for financial assistance and as a result may desist from disclosing investment amounts or acquisition deals which might be viewed “by the market as derisory in comparison to competitors.” Another factor can be the “desire by a previously successful founder to protect their personal brand” after they fail to raise a significant round of funding. Also, there is no single source from company websites, trusted media sites, or industry reports proving that the companies have made acquisitions in the AR/VR space; so we concluded that they hadn't.
As requested, we have completed rows 23-46, columns F-I in the Augmented Reality/VR tab of the provided spreadsheet.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

• According to Goldman Sachs, the industry for augmented and virtual reality will be worth $80 billion by 2025.
• A research carried by CB Insights between 2012 and 2017 concluded that five of the most active investors in the AR/VR space are Rothenberg Ventures, Boost Ventures, Vive X, Venture Realty Fund, and Presence Capital.
• Barclays Bank and JP Morgan Chase are some financial institutions investing in the AR/VR space. Barclays Bank has invested £1.5 million ($2.06 million) in augmented-reality app maker, Blippar and JP Morgan Chase has invested $50 million in Leap Motion, a pioneer in virtual and augmented reality technology.
In conclusion, we have completed rows 23-46, columns F-I in the Augmented Reality/VR tab of the provided spreadsheet. Because of data inadequacy, we could provide the investment amounts of two financial institutions alone: Barclays Bank and JP Morgan Chase. Since there is no single source from company websites, trusted media sites, or industry reports proving that the companies have made acquisitions in the AR/VR space; we concluded that they hadn't.

Part
19
of 42
Part
19

Omnichannel - Rows 23-46

CitiBank, Wells Fargo, Capital One, American Express and HSBC have all invested in the omnichannel retail technology space. Moreover, Intuit and Synchrony Bank have both made acquisitions in this space. As requested, I've populated rows 23 through 46 in the spreadsheet with the relevant information and sources. If no evidence of relevant investments or acquisitions was found, I noted that in column G. You'll find some highlights below.

findings

- Intuit acquired Lettuce for $30 million and Payvment for $7.7 million.

- Synchrony Bank acquired GPShopper for an undisclosed amount.

- Capital One invested in SnapLogic for $40 million.

- HSBC invested in Vizolution for $6.8 million.

- American Express Ventures invested a total of $128 million in multiple omnichannel startups.

- The Wells Fargo Startup Accelerator hosts two omnichannel startups.

conclusion

To wrap up, CitiBank, Wells Fargo, Capital One, American Express and HSBC have all invested in the omnichannel retail technology space. Moreover, Intuit and Synchrony Bank have both made acquisitions in this space.
Part
20
of 42
Part
20

Biometrics - Rows 23-46

For each of the banks listed in rows 23-46 of the biometrics tab of the spreadsheet, we have found how much each company invested within the biometric space. We have also investigated what, if any, acquisitions each company has made within the space.

CONCLUSION

Simple Bank, CitiBank and Wells Fargo have made the biggest financial investments into the area of biometrics out of all the banks investigated. While many banks had made investments in the biometrics space, we found that only American Express had made an acquisition in this area. On December 6, 2016, American Express acquired InAuth, a company focused on biometrics, for an undisclosed amount. All of the statistics have been compiled in the accompanying spreadsheet.
Part
21
of 42
Part
21

AI/Machine Learning - Rows 23-46

FINDINGS
AI and machine learning are new technology and topics and because of this many companies have yet to make major strides in the field. None of the listed banks (Barclays, American Express, TD Bank, Chase, CITI Bank, Capital One, Wells Fargo, HSBC, Santander, Simple Bank, Intuit and Synchrony Bank) have made any investments in AI related companies. They also have not made any acquisitions in the field either. The information is compiled into the attached spreadsheet in Rows 23-46, Columns F-I.
Part
22
of 42
Part
22

Conversational Commerce - Rows 47-82

ARTICLES

The following facts were gathered from a search on Bing for the past year relating to the amount of articles mentioning each company:


Each institution was searched by its proper name as given in the spreadsheet, except for "Chase" the work "bank" was added for the search.

INNOVATIONS

Many of the financial Institutions that are listed on the spreadsheet have engaged in innovations involving conversational commerce. Most are using chat bots or message bots. Price Waterhouse Cooper provides a very in depth article that is included as a source to this write up. The following are details that are entered into the spreadsheet.

Barclays, American Express, TD Bank, Citibank, Capital One, Wells Fargo, HSBC and Santander all have innovations utilizing bots to interface with customers as part of the customer experience. American Express, TD Bank and Wells Fargo are all using Facebook Messenger as their platform.

Chase is unique in that they are using bots, but not at the customer interface level, but rather for backroom operations like granting IT access and reviewing contracts.

Simple Bank and Mint/Intuit do not have innovations in this area. Searches suggested that Intuit and Synchrony are testing platform and are likely to be involved in the near future.

CONCLUSION

In conclusion the above information has been added to the required spreadsheet.
Part
23
of 42
Part
23

Invisible Payments - Rows 47-70

The companies that have the most mentions on Google are Barclaycard (53), JP Morgan Chase (36), American Express (35), Capital One (19), and Wells Fargo (19). Subsequently, those 5 companies are the ones that have done, or are doing, most of the innovation in the field. Barclays is developing a new method of invisible payment called Grab+Go. Capital One is partnering with Amazon to enable voice-activated payments of credit card bills and mortgages. American express and Wells Fargo have already launched their NFC system of invisible payment. ChasePay utilizes tokenized payments whereas TD Bank has started development on different contactless payment methods. All the information was included in rows 47 – 70, column F — I, of the attached spreadsheet.

METHODOLOGY

In order to fill rows 47-58, a google search that was filtered by past year was conducted. The search string used for each search constituted of "bank name AND invisible payments". For rows 59-70 both invisible payments and contactless payments were used to discern if the company had made any innovations. Sources such as Business Insider and the news part of the individual banks were used to search and identify technologies and innovations in invisible payments.

CONCLUSION

To wrap up, all the information was updated in rows 47 – 70, column
F — I, of the attached spreadsheet.
Part
24
of 42
Part
24

Distributed Ledger Technology - Rows 47-70

I have entered the information requested in the attached spreadsheet. Below are some additional considerations taken into account during our research.

ROWS 47-58:
- "Distributed Ledger" was used as the search string instead of the full "Distributed Ledger Technology", as this will yield the greatest number of results while still staying on topic.
- Barclays - Articles that were found due to mentions of Barclay's former CEO Antony/Anthony Jenkins were excluded as these are more about him than about Barclay's activity.
- Simple Bank - These results required a manual review of each article to confirm that it was actually referring to "Simple Bank" and not just a "simple bank solution," as an example.
- For the Intuit/Mint results - To narrow down the search, "Intuit" was used in the search string in an effort to exclude some material, such as 'Royal Mint' or 'US Mint'. We then manually went through the results to ensure it was the Mint that we were looking for.

ROWS 59-70:
- For these entries, only banks that have successfully performed some form of implementation of distributed ledger technology were included. Simply joining a consortium by looking at the technology was deemed insufficient to be included in the list.





Part
25
of 42
Part
25

Augmented Reality/VR - Rows 47-70

Spreadsheet: AR/VR

In the above spreadsheet, the data for rows 47-70, columns F-I in the Augmented Reality/VR tab has been collected. For rows 47-58, the number of articles has been extracted from the Bing search engine. For rows 59-70, the data has been extracted from the company websites and the articles from trusted media sites like FinExtra.
Part
26
of 42
Part
26

Omnichannel - Rows 47-70

For each of the banks listed in rows 47-70 of the omnichannel tab, we have found how many articles mentioning each company have been published within the last year in relation to omnichannel. We have also investigated what, if any, omnichannel innovations each bank currently has live.

Conclusion

American Express, Barclays, Chase and HSBC had the most articles written about them in reference to omnichannel within the past year. In addition to this, we found that most of these banks did have specific innovations within this domain that are currently live. Examples of products that are currently live are Barclaycard's Smartpay, TD Bank's Transmit Security Solution and Chase's mobile app. All of the statistics have been compiled in the accompanying spreadsheet.
Part
27
of 42
Part
27

Biometrics - Rows 47-70

Of the 12 banks listed in rows 47-58 of the "Biometrics" tab of the attached spreadsheet, Capital One had the most articles about its activity within the biometrics space over the past year, with 197. Chase was second, with 193, and Mint/Intuit was third with 192.

Methodology

To determine how many articles each bank had about their activities in the biometric space within the past year, I used Boolean search strings and Google's search features to identify articles that included information about the individual banks and biometrics. Please note that despite my best efforts to weed out irrelevant articles that included mentions of both a bank and biometrics, it is likely some got past me due to my inability to search all results in an in-depth manner. As such, the numbers in column F, rows 47-58 should be considered estimates only.

The information regarding innovations was gleaned through press releases from the banks themselves and articles from reputable industry publications. The only two banks that have apparently not made any innovations in the biometrics space as yet are Simple Bank and Synchrony Bank. The 10 other banks all have at least one biometrics innovation and the details have been entered in column G for rows 59-70 of the "Biometrics" tab of the attached spreadsheet.

Conclusion

The 12 banks listed in rows 47-58 of the "Biometrics" tab of the attached spreadsheet had an approximate total of 1,850 articles written about their activities in the biometrics space within the last year.
Part
28
of 42
Part
28

AI/Machine Learning - Rows 47-70

For each the banks listed between rows 47-70 in the spreadsheet I have found how many articles have been published within the last year on them in relation to AI/machine learning. I have also investigated what, if any, AI/machine learning innovations each bank currently has live.

Overall, I found that American Express, HSBC, Chase, Citi Bank and Santander had the most articles written about them in reference to AI/machine learning within the past year. In addition to this, I found that most of these banks did not have a specific innovation live in this domain, although most of them had made significant steps towards developing this technology. Examples of products that are currently live are Amex Advance from American Express, and Capital One's Eno chatbot.
Part
29
of 42
Part
29

Conversational Commerce - Rows 71-82

Hello,

Your spreadsheet has been completed as requested.

One note, nearly all the companies I searched for didn't have any positions with "conversational" in their title, so I expanded my search to "chat", which is what you see for most entries in the spreadsheet. I considered also using the term "social" or "social media"; however, this resulted in too many items that were simple communications versus actual conversational commerce.

Capital One is the only company that had titles with "conversational", with 5 people with "conversational" in their title, and an additional 15 with "chat".

Thank you.


Part
30
of 42
Part
30

Invisible Payments - Rows 71-82

Information regarding the total number of employees on LinkedIn at the provided financial institutions that had keywords related to invisible payments has been provided on the attached spreadsheet. Below you will find a general overview of each institution and the total number of employees with related keywords in their titles on LinkedIn.

Invisible Payment Employee Counts

Searches were completed by going to the financial institution's home page on LinkedIn. From there, by clicking on the employees related to the business, searches were narrowed using the following keywords related to invisible payments: invisible, cardless, contactless, wallet, digital payment, online payment. The following financial institutions are numbered based on the row that they can be found on the attached spreadsheet, and the number different of employees for each keyword are as follows:

71. Barclays — 8 total employees
Wallet — 1 employee
Contactless — 3 employees
Digital Payment — 3 employees
Online Payment — 1 employee

72. American Express — 16 total employees
Contactless — 5 employees
Digital Payment — 6 employees
Wallet — 5 employees

73. TD Bank — 1 total employee
Wallet — 1 employee

74. Chase — 1 total employee
Digital Payment — 1 employee

75. Citi Bank — 8 total employees
Wallet — 2 employees
Digital Payment — 6 employees

76. Capital One — 4 total employees
Digital Payment — 2 employees
Wallet — 2 employees

77. Wells Fargo — 8 total employees
Wallet — 7 employees
Digital Payment — 1 employee

78. HSBC — 6 total employees
Wallet — 2 employees
Digital Payment — 4 employees

79. Santander — 0 total employees
There were no employees with any keywords related to invisible payments.

80. Simple Bank — 0 total employees
There were no employees with any keywords related to invisible payments.

81. Mint/Intuit — 0 total employees
There were no employees with any keywords related to invisible payments.

82. Synchrony Bank — 2 total employees
Digital Payment — 2 employees

Conclusion

Note that the financial institutions on the spreadsheet had very few employees with keywords in their titles related to invisible payments, in comparison to the company size and total number of employees. For companies that had no employees with keywords, links to their LinkedIn pages have been provided. Links for each keyword under each financial institution have been listed under row Column J in the spreadsheet.
Part
31
of 42
Part
31

Distributed Ledger Technology - Rows 71-82

As requested, rows 71-82, columns F-I of the "Distributed Ledger Technology" tab in the attached spreadsheet have been completed.

FINDINGS

By using the keywords "database", "blockchain", and "distributed" we were able to estimate the number of people working at the listed companies with domain related keywords in their title. We found that the keywords used always generated results. However, some companies would only yield results for one of the three keywords used, others would only yield results for two of the three keywords, while the majority of companies generated results with all three keywords. As a result, we were able to provide links to two or three LinkedIn profiles of the listed companies below.

1. Barclays
Database - 81
Blockchain - 5
Distributed - 6

2. American Express
Database - 76
Blockchain - 5
Distributed - 4

3. TD Bank
Database - 82
Blockchain - 7
Distributed - 2

4. Chase
Database - 28
Blockchain - NA
Distributed - NA

5. Citi Bank
Database -291
Blockchain - 3
Distributed - 43

6. Capital One
Database - 78
Blockchain - 3
Distributed - 8

7. Wells Fargo
Database - 915
Blockchain - 1
Distributed - 26

8. HSBC
Database - 160
Blockchain - 6
Distributed - 26

9. Santander
Database - 15
Blockchain - NA
Distributed - 1

10. Simple Bank
Database - NA
Blockchain - 1
Distributed - NA

11. Mint/Intuit
Database - 42
Blockchain - 1
Distributed - NA

12. Synchrony Bank
Database - 7
Blockchain - NA
Distributed - NA

We have provided the total number of profiles that contain one or more of the keywords as well as links to two or three LinkedIn profiles of the listed companies.

Conclusion

The estimated number of people working at the listed companies in rows 71-82, columns F-I of the "Distributed Ledger Technology" tab are available in the attached spreadsheet.
Part
32
of 42
Part
32

Augmented Reality/VR - Rows 71-82

Only employees at Capital One and Wells Fargo have the keywords “Augmented Reality,” “Virtual Reality,” or “VR” in their profiles. Rows 71-82 in the Augmented Reality/VR tab of the attached spreadsheet have been completed. Below, I will present the methodology and the findings.

METHODOLOGY

Only employees with the keywords “Augmented Reality,” “Virtual Reality,” or “VR” in their profiles were included in the final calculation. Searches with “AR” revealed that employees with “AR” in their title are in departments that deal with “accounts receivable” or “account reconciliation” instead of “augmented reality.” The only exception is Wells Fargo’s Andriy Fedorchuk (AR/VR Developer), who has also appeared in the search for “VR” in the title. Thus employees with “AR” in their profile were not included in the total calculation. Please also note that as there is only a showcase page for Mint, the employees’ profiles for Intuit were utilized for this research.

CAPITAL ONE

There are two Capital One employees with the keywords Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality/VR in their profiles. Nicholas Angel is a Sr. Creative Director, Digital Design at Capital One and also a VR UX Consultant at Against Gravity. Tommy Rayburn is a Principal User Experience Designer at Capital One and also a VR Interaction Designer at Richmond VR Consulting.

WELLS FARGO

There is one Wells Fargo employee with the keywords Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality/VR in his profile. Andriy Fedorchuk is an AR/VR Developer, Innovation Group Wells Fargo. Before joining Wells Fargo, he was a Unity VR Developer at Toyota Info Technology Center Co., Ltd. from Jan 2016 – Apr 2017 and Unity Designer/VR Developer at PlayStation from Sep 2015 – Sep 2016.

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, rows 71-82 in the Augmented Reality/VR tab of the attached spreadsheet have been completed. Only employees at Capital One and Wells Fargo have the keywords “Augmented Reality,” “Virtual Reality,” or “VR” in their profiles.

Part
33
of 42
Part
33

Omnichannel - Rows 71-82

I have completed rows 71-82, columns F-I of the attached spreadsheet as requested. Five of the companies in rows 71-82 do not have any employee with the keyword "omnichannel" (or "omni-channel" or "omni channel") in his/her LinkedIn profile. You can access the full details in the attached spreadsheet.
METHODOLOGY
For each company in the rows 71-82, I searched LinkedIn to find the number of employees with the keyword "omnichannel"/"omni-channel"/"omni channel" in their profile. I refined the search to only show employees currently working at each company of interest. I then added up the total number of such employees and presented the total in the spreadsheet as requested. I also provided links to 2-3 LinkedIn Profiles of such employees in column G of the spreadsheet, where more than one of such profiles exist. I have provided the sources I used in column I of the spreadsheet. You can access the full information here.
CONCLUSION
To wrap up, I have completed rows 71-82, columns F-I of the attached spreadsheet as requested.
Part
34
of 42
Part
34

Biometrics - Rows 71-82

Only employees at Barclays and Citi Bank have the keyword “Biometrics” in their profiles/title. Rows 71-82 in the Biometrics tab of the attached spreadsheet have been completed. Please note that as there is only a showcase page for Mint, the employees’ profiles from Intuit were utilized for this research. Below, I will present the summary of the findings.

BARCLAYS

There are three Barclays employees with the keyword “Biometrics” in their profiles. They are Stuart McElney, VP, Head of Biometrics, Helen Hazel, Voice Biometrics and Direct Call Adoption Manager, and Steven Dunn, Voice Biometrics Support Analyst.

CITI BANK

There are two Citi Bank employees with the keyword “Biometrics” in their profiles. They are Jianguo Wang, SVP, Biometrics Program Leader and Craig Montero, Assistant Vice President, Global IVR, and Voice Biometrics Design.

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, rows 71-82 in the Biometrics tab of the attached spreadsheet have been completed. Only employees at Barclays and Citi Bank have the keyword “Biometrics” in their profiles/title.

Part
35
of 42
Part
35

AI/Machine Learning - Rows 71-82

There are 75 Capital One employees with the keywords Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning in their profiles. There are no Simple Bank (Simple Finance) employees with the keywords Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning in their profiles. Rows 71-82 of the attached spreadsheet has been completed. Below, I will present the summary of the findings.

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS

1. Barclays
Total: 3
Artificial Intelligence: 0
Machine Learning: 3
2. American Express
Total: 19
Artificial Intelligence: 4
Machine Learning: 15
3. TD Bank
Total: 9
Artificial Intelligence: 3
Machine Learning: 6
4. Chase (JPMorgan Chase)
Total: 21
Artificial Intelligence: 2
Machine Learning: 19
5. Citi Bank
Total: 19
Artificial Intelligence: 2
Machine Learning: 17
6. Capital One
Total: 75
Artificial Intelligence: 2
Machine Learning: 73
7. Wells Fargo
Total: 26
Artificial Intelligence: 17
Machine Learning: 9
8. HSBC
Total: 11
Artificial Intelligence: 5
Machine Learning: 6
9. Santander
Total: 2
Artificial Intelligence: 1
Machine Learning: 1
10. Simple Bank (Simple Finance)
Total: 0
Artificial Intelligence: 0
Machine Learning: 0
11. Mint/Intuit
Total: 10 (Intuit employees have been provided as Mint has a showcase page only)
Artificial Intelligence: 3
Machine Learning: 7 (exclude duplicates in AI search)
12. Synchrony Bank (Synchrony Financial)
Total: 2
Artificial Intelligence: 0
Machine Learning: 2

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, rows 71-82 of the attached spreadsheet has been completed. Capital One has the most number of employees (75) with the keywords Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning in their profiles.

Part
36
of 42
Part
36

Conversational Commerce - Rows 83-91

Hello, and thank you for your request about information regarding conversational commerce. Per your request, we have searched for and entered the data contained in rows 83-91 on the attached spreadsheet.

The short answer is that conversational commerce is a fast growing area, with at least 7 start-ups created in 2016/17 alone.

However, it was difficult to find information about both the amount of money invested in this emerging sector in 2016/17, and the number of deals/IPOs/acquisitions. We found at least one, with ReplyYes (one of the more well-known companies providing this service) raising $6.5 million in this period.

It appears consumers may be a little dubious about the technology in this early stage, with less than half of those surveyed saying they would use a chatbot-based conversational commerce service. There are also concerns around the ability of the chatbots to respond like a human being, provide the right information, empathy, and the machine learning processes at their core to be manipulated.
There also appears to be a lack of regulatory oversight from FINRA, CFPB and the FCC.
Part
37
of 42
Part
37

Invisible Payments - Rows 83-91

The complete details of my research have been orgainzed and summarized in the attached spreadsheet. I have completed Rows 83-91, as per your request. I hope that you find this useful.

Key findings included that the industry as a whole processed $9.8 billion in invisible payments in 2017, with 4 million consumers using checkout apps. Although there was no specific investment in invisible payments for 2016, global investments in Fintech rose 10% to 23.2 billion USD. There was no published information regarding the number of consumers that have adopted invisible payments, nor for specific number of acquisitions world-wide. However, I was able to find that the highest usage of digital wallets is with Walmart Pay (5.95%), followed by Apple Pay (5.7%) and Samsung Pay (3.03%).

I hope that you find this helpful!
Part
38
of 42
Part
38

Distributed Ledger Technology - Rows 83-91

We have updated the relevant rows within the attached spreadsheet as requested. Please see below additional notes regarding our findings.

FINDINGS

The majority of the information requested was located by direct searches performed through the relevant industry archives (SAP, FINRA, CFPB, etc.) and official government cites (FCC.gov). Note that in the case of rows 90 and 91, thorough searches were conducted on both CFPB and FCC sites and returned no official mention of Distributed Ledger Technology or Blockchain. A search of non-official sources returned information regarding a letter penned July 21, 2016, by 22 United States Senators and sent to CPFB director Richard Cordray and other official regulatory agency heads. According to a coindesk.com report, the letter reportedly stated that the senators were looking for guidance to "better understand the way US regulators oversee FinTech and their relationships with federally regulated financial institutions". There does not appear to have been any official response to the letter and no reference or notation of the request was found in a subsequent search of the CFPB site.

CONCLUSION

We have updated the requested Distributed Ledger Technology information within the attached spreadsheet.
Part
39
of 42
Part
39

Augmented Reality/VR - Rows 83-91

Augmented Reality (AR) and Video Reality (VR) entertainment technology is becoming very successful financially with a total of $11.4 billion dollars worldwide. The questions regarding investment trends, consumer issues, and existing legislation are answered on Row 83 through Row 91 in the attached spreadsheet. There is a brief summary of each question here as well.

Investment trends

Row 83: The number of VC Interest startups was 1,092 found with the keywords augmented reality startups. The title of the source was Angel List.

Row 84: In 2017, there were $11.4 billion dollars spent on AR/VR products and services. IDC-Worldwide Spending on A/VR was the source.

Row 85: There were 199 deals/IPO/Acquisitions found in 2016-2017. VR had 52% of them and AR had 22%. CBInsights and TechAcute were two of the sources used. There were 21 "Major AR and VR Acquisitions" in the past 12 Months from TechAcute:

1. 3DPhy.com Acquired by PropTiger (11-Aug-16)
2. Secret Location Acquired by Entertainment One (18-Aug-16)
3. Kid Neon Images Acquired by Deloitte (19-Sep-16)
4. Turnspace Acquired by HomeAway (19-Sep-16)
5. BioLucid Acquired by Sharecare (29-Sep-16)
6. Nozon Acquired by Starbreeze (25-Oct-16)
7. VOKE Acquired by Intel (3-Nov-16)
8. Grue Games Acquired by Seismic Games (15-Nov-16)
9. Cimagine Media Acquired by Snap Inc. (25-Dec-16)
10. Impulsonic Acquired by Valve Software (12-Jan-17)
11. Amazon (HK) Acquired by Fireswirl Technologies (3-Feb-17)
12. Dacuda Acquired by Magic Leap (20-Feb-17)
13. gestigon Acquired by Valeo (13-Mar-17)
14. Arrow VR Acquired by Imperium Media (11-Apr-17)
15. Into the VR World Acquired by AppSwarm Inc. (13-Apr-17)
16. XPerception Acquired by Baidu (13-Apr-17)
17. Saiyan Productions Acquired by Imperium Media (10-May-17)
18. Owlchemy Labs Acquired by Google (10-May-17)
19. VRB Acquired by Samsung Electronics (16-Jun-17)
20. Pericept Acquired by ClearEdge3D (6-Jul-17)
21. SpaceView Acquired by Atheer (12-Jul-17)

Consumer information

Row 86: Approval. The percentage of consumers who are excited to adopt this technology is 71% of generation Z and 58% of millennial people like VR technology. Touchstone Research was the source of this information.

Row 87: Feedback. Consumer feedback was 79% of first-time users seek to experience VR again. 81% already use VR according to Touchstone Research.

Row 88: The top five consumer concerns were found in DesignNews. They think that VR needs to be cheaper because it is too expensive for most consumers. Good content needs to be expanded. The challenge is to make VR more mobile and less tethered for the public. People want 5G speed for faster wireless communication. Cybersecurity should be emphasized more for VR use based on consumer concerns.

Legislation

Row 89-91: There was no existing legislation found in the FINRA Institute, the CFPB Consumer Finance Protection Bureau, or the FCC Federal Communications Commission.

Conclusion

Results show that people are extremely interested in the Augmented and Virtual Reality entertainment. The total spend for AR/VR was $11.4 billion dollars worldwide. Please refer to the attached spreadsheet to see the entire body of work you requested.
Part
40
of 42
Part
40

Omnichannel - Rows 83-91

According to industry reports and consumer surveys, omnichannel retail is important to investors, retailers and consumers. Significant investments have been made by venture capitalists into startups in this space in the past two years. Consumers strongly support omnichannel retail, and demand a higher-quality omnichannel experience. Still, there are some concerns and challenges preventing omnichannel from being fully-realized by all retailers. As requested, I've filled in all the relevant details in rows 83 to 91 of the spreadsheet, and I've also mentioned the highlights below.

findings


- Total investment in this space was approximately $800 million in 2016 in 170 deals.

- 70% of consumers feel it’s important for retailers to offer an omnichannel experience; however, only 50% feel satisfied with the omnichannel experience from their favorite retailer.

- Concerns about omnichannel include technological barriers, synchronizing and integrating data, ensuring customer engagement across all channels, avoiding channel conflicts, and avoiding gaps.

- Omnichannel is not mentioned by FINRA, CFPB, or FCC.

conclusion

To wrap up, I've populated the spreadsheet with details on investments in omnichannel retail, consumer feedback on the omnichannel experience, concerns and challenges in this space, and regulatory oversight.
Part
41
of 42
Part
41

Biometrics - Rows 83-91

The complete details of my research findings have been organized and summarized in the attached spreadsheet. I have completed rows 83-91, as per you request.

KEY FINDINGS

There are 125 different biometric startups on AngelList, with 545 investors. I was unable to find a total number for all investments in the industry, but I did find that the biometrics industry was worth $12 billion USD in 2016, with a 20% CAGR. In regards to consumer adoption, 38% of consumers use fingerprint recognition
15% of consumers use voice recognition and 11% of consumers use facial recognition. 86% of consumers reported that they would be excited to adopt biometrics. False acceptance rate, false rejection rate, privacy, cost, ease of integration, original capture of biometrics and user acceptance rates are the key concerns with biometrics.

Biometrics appeared in ten articles in FINRA and one article in FCC. IT did not appear in CFPB.

In conclusion, rows 83-91 in the Biometrics tab of the attached spreadsheet have been completed. I hope that you find this helpful!







Part
42
of 42
Part
42

AI/Machine Learning - Rows 83-91

All relevant findings pertaining to AI/Machine Learning have been entered in rows 83 to 91, columns F to I in the attached spreadsheet, as per direct instructions.

SUMMARY

— There were 260 AI startups in 2016.
— Between $26 billion and $39 billion was invested in the domain of AI in 2016.
107 deals were recorded in the 12 months from Q3 2016 to Q2 2017. A list of all publicly available information on these deals can be found in the attached spreadsheet.
— With regard to consumer interest, 87% are interested in AI technology. Within this area, 27% of consumers are very interested in using AI technology, 31% are interested in trying it out, possibly just once, out of curiosity, 29% are willing to try it and would continue use if it works well.
—According to PwC, 67% of consumers surveyed believe that AI technology will assist with solving complex problems that modern society is faced with. Additionally, with regard to impact on day-to-day life, 58% of consumers believe that AI assistants used as a tutor would be their choice of use, while 22% said that a medical AI assistant, used in place of a doctor, would be their first choice.
— The top 5 concerns regarding AI technology, according to Google, are:
1. Negative side effects
2. Reward hacking
3. Scalable oversight
4. Safe exploration
5. Robustness to distributional shift
— AI is mentioned in FINRA.
— AI in not mentioned in CFPB but machine learning is.
— AI is mentioned in FCC.

CONCLUSION

As per your request, all relevant findings relating to AI and Machine Learning have been entered into the attached spreadsheet in rows 83 to 91, columns F to I.
Sources
Sources

From Part 17
From Part 23
From Part 25
From Part 27