People Moving Homes in US

Part
01
of four
Part
01

People Moving Homes in the US - Life Transitions

According to an article by Eve Thompson of Reston Real Estate, a majority of individuals buy and sell homes as a result of a major life event like marriage, birth of a child, new job or illness. Every year, in their Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) of the Current Population Survey (CPS), the U.S. Census Bureau surveys the various reasons people move houses in the US. The survey categorizes the life transitions into four main types: family, job, housing and other. According to the 2016 survey, almost 27.7 percent of individuals moved homes due to family, 20.2 percent due to a job, 42.2 percent due to housing and 10.2 percent due to other reasons.

Family

In the 2016 ASEC survey, the main family-related reasons provided by participants were:

* Change in marital status including marriage and divorce (4.8 percent)
* Desire to establish their own household (12.2 percent)
* Other family-related reasons including moving in with other family members, pregnancy, giving birth to or adopting a baby, taking care of a family member, the death of a family member and the desire to move closer to family (10.5 percent)

job

In the 2016 ASEC survey, the main job-related reasons provided by participants were:

* A new job, job transfer or job relocation (10.8 percent)
* Searching for a job or losing a job (1.5 percent)
* Desire to be closer to the work-place for easier commute (6 percent)
* Retirement and moving into active-adult communities (0.6 percent)
* Other job-related reasons (1.2 percent)

housing

In the 2016 ASEC survey, the main housing-related reasons provided by participants were:

* Desire to own a house instead of renting a house (5.9 percent)
* Desire to own a new or better home or apartment including homes with specific attachments like pools and gardens (17.4 percent)
* Desire to move to a better neighborhood with lower crime rates and better public facilities (3.1 percent)
* Desire for cheaper housing due to financial constraints (8.2 percent)
* Foreclosure or eviction (0.9 percent)
* Other housing-related reasons including completion of the lease period, issues with the landlord, desire to downsize to a smaller house or apartment when children move-out, and searching for housing after being homeless, incarcerated or selling off the previous house (6.7 percent)

other reasons

In the 2016 ASEC survey, the other reasons provided by participants were:

* Entering into or graduating from college (3.2 percent)
* Desire for a change of climate (0.8 percent)
* Personal or familial health reasons (1.8 percent)
* Other reasons including moving in with non-family members like roommates or cohabitors (4.4 percent)

trends in moving houses

* An analysis of the Census Bureau survey by Livability shows that households with median income of $50,000 and above were 17 to 23 percent more likely to move for job-related reasons than households with median income less than $50,000.

* According to the Movers Development report on the moving trends of 2016, the busiest day for moving was Friday and the busiest months were June, July, and August.

* According to the Movers Development report, 25.2 percent individuals relocated to one-bedroom houses and 23.4 percent to two-bedroom houses.

* According to the Movers Development report, the tops states for relocating were California, Florida, Texas, New Jersey and Illinois.

* According to the Movers Development report, the tops cities for relocating were New York City, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles and Miami.

In conclusion, the main reasons people move houses in the US are the desire to move to a better house and the desire to establish their own household.
Part
02
of four
Part
02

People Moving Homes in the US - Problems & Tools

The most identifiable problem faced by people in the process of moving homes in the U.S. is securing a better home. The most probable tool for solving this issue involves using a search directory that enables them to easily find out what they want. Hence, moving persons most likely use websites or relocation apps as tools that make the home search process easier and smoother. However, people moving in the U.S. experience the following common pain points: location, spending time apartment hunting, missing out on available units, fear of getting scammed by online relocation firms, insufficient information on available relocation services providers, convenience of access and available social facilities and amenities. In a bid to solve these pain points the following strategies have been implemented: use of elaborate relocation websites and using a comprehensive search directory.

Reasons of moving in the U.S.

1. Outgrown a place
2. Can no longer afford your rental
3. Ability to afford a luxurious rental
4. Improve a commuting issue
5. Want to be in a bigger neighborhood
6. Inconveniences of an old place
7. Dislike for the current building
8. It feels like a good time to move
9. Dislike for apartment living

MOVING pain points

1. Location

Location is a priority for every renter in the U.S. Moving in the U.S. can be hectic especially where the home is located away from the work place and social facilities and amenities such as hospitals, banks, schools among others. Most suburbs in the U.S. have a desirable appeal, however, the safety and access may make them expensive and not easily affordable. Without the proper guidance, one moving into a home in the U.S. may land a house in a mix of new construction, classic gems or total dumps.

2. Budget constraints

When searching for a house in the U.S. working within a budget might seem tricky where one has no accurate information on the costs involved. Most renters may actually end up with their dream home, but only after coughing up extra money because the house needed a lot of improvements or renovations.

3. Insufficient information

Besides the plethora of relocation websites, a search directory, social media platforms, or blogs and online media ads may provide information for persons moving, but, may prove insufficient and lacking since the various states have varying regulations and the real estate market is dynamic, which can make the home search in America troublesome.

4. Time spent apartment searching/ Hunting

Apartment hunting can be extremely time consuming further delaying the decision to move. Physical location of vacant homes can be tricky in a vast place as in the U.S. Further, the apartment hunting process may prove problematic, especially where communication between an apartment hunter and an owner is harbored by unforeseen communication flaws.

5. Missing out on available units

Timely booking of a house, depending on the location and apartment availability, is a major challenge for most renters. Missing out on available units is a pain point as one has the indecision moment, particularly on finite issues such as the floor plan or the size of the home.

6. Other issues

In addition, various researches reveal that there are other multiple issues that face anyone on the move in America such as;
Fear of being scammed by home marketers both online or physically.
— Implementing the leasing process to completion within a small-time frame.
— Use of outdated technology which may cause delays in digital payments and property management systems.
— People moving for family reasons other than getting married or starting a household.

Solutions or Tools to Home Movers in the U.S.

The following is a comprehensive list of some of the best national rental websites that are available for use in the home hunt in the U.S. Some of these relocation sites in include Apartments.com, Homefinder and ForRent. They provide sufficient information on available units, sizes and costs among other information needed to make a final decision. These apps and rental sites conduct elaborate research on the local rental market reports which allows home buyers or renters to make informed decisions.
Part
03
of four
Part
03

People Moving Homes in the US - Household Numbers

Only 11.2% of Americans relocated during 2016 compared with the 1980s when about 20% of people were moving every year. On the other hand, the average size of relocations has been increasing over the past several years and is forecasted to continue. The number of people that have moved homes in the US during the year 2016-17 have been identified below according to the reasons for relocation.

methodology

According to the previous request, the main reasons that people in the US move homes can be categorized into 4 groups. Namely; family related, employment related, housing related and other reasons. These categories align with the data found from the Census Bureau on the number of people that moved during 2016-17 for this research.

findings

According to the Census Bureau, a total of 34,902,000 people in the US moved from their homes during the period (2016-17). Based on this chart, the highest number people (15,014,000) had moved due to housing related reasons. This is 43% of total movers. 9,738,000 (28%) moved homes due to family related reasons, and for 6,447,000 (18%), it was employment related. The remaining 3,703,000 (11%) had moved due to other reasons. The breakdown of the numbers of each category can be found on this chart from the Census Bureau. This information is summarized below. (rounding off differences remain)

1. family related reasons

Change in marital status -1,786,000
To establish own household -4,023,000
Other family reason- 3,928,000
Total: 9,738,000

2. employment related reasons

New job or job transfer-3,462,000
To look for work or lost job -453,000
To be closer to work/easier commute-1,924,000
Retired -290,000
Other job related reason- 317,000
Total: 6,447,000

3. housing related reasons

Wanted own home, not rent -2,554,000
Wanted new or better home/ apartment-5,576,000
Wanted better neighborhood /less crime-969,000
Wanted cheaper housing-2,895,000
Foreclosure/eviction-373,000
Other housing reason-2,647,000
Total: 15,014,000

4. other reasons

To attend or leave college-1,030,000
Change of climate-184,000
Health reasons-672,000
Natural disaster-91,000
Other reasons-1,726,000
Total: 3,703,000

Sale of houses

There was no information found on the buying and selling of houses that is directly linked with the relocation statistics identified above. However, according to the National Association of Realtors, the number of existing homes sold during 2016 was 5,450,000 and in 2017 it was 5,510,000. As an average, the number of homes sold during 2016-17 was 5,480,000 (5,450,000+5,510,000/2). According to Statista, the number of newly built houses sold during 2016 was 560,000.

conclusion

In conclusion, during the year 2016-17, the largest number of people (43%) had relocated due to housing related reasons. Out of the 15,014,000 that had moved, the most common housing related reason for relocation was to find a new or better home/ apartment. 9,738,000 moved homes due to family related reasons, and for 6,447,00, it was employment related. The remaining 3,703,000 relocated due to other reasons.
Part
04
of four
Part
04

People Moving Homes in the US - Key Characteristics

Among those moving in the U.S., the four main categories in terms of reason for moving are family-related, employment-related, housing-related, and other. Based on my research, I was able to identify key characteristics and demographics of these various groups, including distance of move, homeownership status, income, employment, and socioeconomic factors. You'll find a deep dive of my research below.

family

Among those moving for family-related reasons, almost half moved less than 50 miles, meaning they are likely still within the same county. A quarter moved 50-199 miles, and another quarter moved more than 500 miles. About one-third of this group are homeowners, while two-thirds rent their homes.

Overall, a quarter of movers (regardless of reason) have household incomes of over $100,000. Moreover, those with incomes over $100,000 moving for family-related reasons are significantly more likely to move to establish their own household than for any other family-related reason. Of those, 25% moved for family-related reasons. Of the remaining 75% of movers, those moving for family-related reasons tend to be lower-income, with a large share having between $10,000 and $50,000 in household income.

Two-thirds of those moving for family-related reasons are civilian employees, and another quarter are not in the labor force. The most common occupation categories among this group are professional, service, and armed forces/not in civilian labor force. The most common industry by far is healthcare and education, followed by armed forces/non-civilian.

Women are slightly more likely than men to move for family-related reasons. In terms of age, they tend to be between 20 and 64. Family-related movers are 56% white, 18% Hispanic or Latino, and 16% black. They tend to have educational attainment between a high school degree and a bachelor's degree, with slightly more having a high school degree or associate's degree. The most common marital status for this group is either married (with spouse present), divorced, or never married.

job

Those moving for job-related reasons are more likely to have a household income above $50,000 than below $50,000. Of those with incomes over $100,000 (which represent 1/4 of movers overall), one-quarter moved for employment-related reasons. Aside from that income group, those moving for this reason tend to be middle-class, with incomes between $30,000 and $100,000.

One-third of this group moved 500 miles or more, while one quarter moved less than 50 miles. One-quarter of this group are homeowners, while three-quarters are renters.

Among those moving for employment, two-thirds are civilian employees, and 20% are not in the labor force. The most common occupation categories in this group are management/business/financial, professional, service, and armed forces/not in labor force. The most common industry by far is healthcare and education, followed by armed forces.

In terms of sex, this group is fairly evenly split between men and women. Those moving for this reason tend to be between ages 25 and 44, and 57% are white, 18% are Hispanic or Latino, and 11% are black. This group is split fairly evenly across all levels of educational attainment, with the exception of those without a high school degree, who presumably would have difficulty finding any kind of employment. Those who are divorced are about half as likely to move for employment than for family- or housing-related reasons.

housing

Of those who moving for housing-related reasons, two-thirds move less than 50 miles, indicating they are just moving to a new home within the same community. Another 15% moved between 50 and 199 miles. Those who stay in the same county are significantly less likely to cite employment-related reasons for moving; they overwhelmingly give housing-related reasons.

Among the quarter of movers with incomes over $100,000, one third moved for housing-related reasons. Besides this group, those moving for this reason were fairly evenly split across income categories.

Two-thirds of this group are civilian employees, and another 25% are not in the labor force. The most common occupations are management/business/financial, professional, service, and armed forces. The most common industries are health care and education, wholesale and retail trade, professional and business services, and leisure and hospitality. Across almost all industries, people were more likely to move for housing-realted reasons than any other - the exceptions are information, agriculture/forestry, and other services.

In terms of sex, this group is fairly evenly split between men and women. Those moving for this reason tend to be between ages 30 and 64, and they are 50% white, 22% hispanic or latino, and 17% black. Many in this group has a high school degree or an associates degree as their highest level of educational attainment. The most likely marital status in this group by far is either married (with spouse present) or never married. This group is also likely to be divorced. Those who are married, with their spouse present are about twice as likely to move for housing reasons than for any other reason; those who have never been married are also more likely to give this reason.

other

Among those who reported moving for reasons other than the previous three, one-third moved less than 50 miles, one-quarter moved between 50 and 199 miles, and another quarter moved more than 500 miles.

This groups tends to be low-income, with the largest numbers in the under-$30,000 income group. The most common industry in this group is education and health services. In terms of sex, this group is fairly evenly split between men and women.

One common alternative reason for moving is to attend or leave college. This was a very commonly given reason for those with less than $10,000 in income. Those with incomes between $50,000 and $59,000 were significantly more likely to move for this reason than other reasons.

Another common reason is for health. This reason is very uncommon for those with incomes between $50,000 and $59,000. However, low-income people are especially likely to move for health reasons. Women are significantly more likely to move for this reason than men. Moreover, those between 45 and 64 years in age are more likely than other age groups to move for this reason.

A change of climate is another commonly cited alternative reason for moving. Almost no one in the $85,000-$99,000 income group gave this reason. On the other hand, those aged between 30 and 64 are more likely than other age groups to give this reason.

conclusion

To wrap up, I've given a detailed characteristic and demographic profile for those in the U.S. moving for the following reasons: family-related, employment-related, housing-related, and other.

Sources
Sources