How people see innovation in the context of healthcare and hospitals

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Innovation in Healthcare and Hospitals

In the US, innovation in the context of healthcare and hospitals is seen by Americans as change that prioritizes positive health outcomes for patients. More specifically, three unique areas include: (1) providing virtual care and access to remote health coaching; (2) providing access to independent health advocates; and (3) driving overall change through the consumer experience.

PROVIDING VIRTUAL CARE AND ACCESS TO REMOTE HEALTH COACHING

PROVIDING VIRTUAL CARE AND ACCESS TO REMOTE HEALTH COACHING

ADDED VALUE FOR RURAL AMERICA

  • People would like to see "comprehensive care" that integrates virtual specialists with local providers in rural areas.
  • Studies have found that adding virtually connected care to rural America may also have value for retaining rural physicians in more remote areas otherwise cut off from their colleagues.
  • People want to see the potential of technological advances and virtual care hubs to improve the overall health experience of rural Americans embraced.

PROVIDING ACCESS TO INDEPENDENT PATIENT HEALTH ADVOCATES

DRIVING OVERALL CHANGE THROUGH THE PATIENT EXPERIENCE

Research Strategy:

To determine how people see or define innovation in the context of healthcare and hospitals, we focused our research on information available from recent health care surveys, studies, reports and analyses provided by the health agencies of the US government, leading healthcare market consulting agencies, and medical professional organizations and their leaders. We also considered healthcare innovation trends identified in reputable medical news-related articles and websites.

To account for the uniqueness requested, we eliminated areas related to cost-reduction and cost-saving measures, as well as areas commonly identified by policy experts, such as Medicare/Medicaid reform. "Top" expected changes or innovations sought by the average American was determined by looking for dominant commonalities across the available information and then eliminating any area that wasn't corroborated by at least one of the following: (a) a study that explicitly surveyed American patients, or (b) the views of healthcare providers working regularly with patients. We then synthesized these results into the three areas identified in this brief.
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