Cosmetic Teledermatology

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Cosmetic Teledermatology

We were unable to find any materials that dealt directly with the request for information on "the shifts in over-the-counter skincare to clinically-driven solutions...." Instead, we found that consumers are using more OTC products that ever before. The five 2019-2020 trends in skincare products that we identified below will illustrate these findings, along with information on prescription medications and natural ingredients.

Helpful Findings

Five Trends in Skin Care Product Marketing and Manufacturing

  • Acne and other skin conditions common to 11-30-year-old people are becoming accepted and are being treated with OTC products as well as with traditional dermatologist-prescribed products. A prescription acne product called Tretinoin is available for patients.
  • Skin technology devices are selling more widely. Personalized skin care, including DNA-based prescribed face care is a sector that has been growing sector since 2015. Research from Forrester reveals that 77 percent of consumers have chosen, recommended or paid more for a personalised service or experience...."
  • According to CosmeticsBusiness.com, "across the industry, microbiome skin care has been declared the next big thing in beauty." Ninety percent of "US millennials say they have tried or would like to try probiotics in facial skin care products"....
  • There is a consumer shift towards skin care that focuses on "specific lifestyle concerns", from "period skin care" to brands that focus on acne, to focus on skin tone, to focus on consumers from 15 to 30, to consumers over 45. For example, "Retinoids, which are topical or oral products related to Vitamin A, are present in many skincare products and treatments" that are used to treat "aging, wrinkles, acne and hyperpigmentation. Retinoids, most commonly known as Retinol, are available by prescription. There are professional-grade Retinol skin care products available in creams, lotions, serums and even some moisturizers."
  • Changes in sunscreen is a trend. Consumers have focused on rising temperatures and ocean-safe ingredients, sun-induced aging and skin cancer, and new regulations that target ingredients allowed and prohibited.

Prescription Skin Care Products Trends

  • "Biologic agents or protein-based drugs are increasingly used in dermatology for treatment of psoriasis ...and other inflammatory skin diseases. Treatment of psoriasis is the largest area of development for dermatological biologics. There are around 10 approved biologics in the dermatological products market to treat moderate to severe psoriasis."
  • "Manufacturers in dermatological products market are also focusing on developing sunscreen products with SPF between 15 and 50 to provide better protection against damaging UV radiation."
  • Scar treatments are in demand. "...[T]he rise in surgical procedures worldwide is driving the demand for scar treatment products...." Manufacturers are "developing silicon gels and mild skin products that can reduce the appearance of the scars."

"Natural" Skin Care Product Ingredients

  • "Consumers should not necessarily assume that an 'organic' or 'natural' ingredient or product would possess greater inherent safety than another chemically identical version of the same ingredient", according to a former FDA Commissioner.
  • In fact, according to experts, certain "natural, organic ingredients used in skincare products can cause significant skin sensitivities that build up over time. Some of them can also be harsh and abrasive on skin." This includes fragrance and essential oils.

Research Strategy

We searched for information on trends in the use of "clinical-grade or prescription skincare products" but found very little. We expanded the search to trends in OTC skincare products and located substantial information on trends in the use of those products. We looked for comparisons of clinical-grade products and OTC products, but did not find any articles. We found one description of three prescription products (Latisse, Nu-Derm, Tretinoin), but no statistics on their use. We looked for surveys of dermatology patients and found information on the surgical procedures that patients obtain from dermatologists, but not on skincare products they purchase from dermatologists.



Sources
Sources

Quotes
  • "Over-the-counter (OTC) products are vastly different from prescription products. Other than the fact that a doctor does not need to write a prescription for OTC products, manufacturers of OTC products do not have to follow as many rules before offering their products for sale."
  • "The FDA...[is] responsible for protecting the public health by ensuring the safety, efficacy, and security of human drugs, biological products, medical devices, food, and cosmetics. They [sic] do this by regulating the manufacturing, marketing, and distribution of products. There are lists provided by the FDA that explain to companies offering OTC skincare products which ingredients are safe to use. As long as these companies follow the rules for which ingredients they are permitted to use and in what doses they are permitted to use, their products are allowed to be sold to the public."
  • " Prescription products are considered to be “drugs,” because they are designed to treat a medical condition. These conditions can be anything from acne to hyperpigmentation in the skin."
  • "... prescription medications can only be prescribed by a medical doctor. After a prescription is written by a medical professional, only a pharmacy can provide that product to you."
  • "A difference between the two types of skincare is that prescription products have to satisfy many federal rules and regulations in order to be sold. Even after a prescription drug is approved by the FDA, it must pass several clinical trials before it is ever sold for patient use. It’s expensive to do such a large amount of testing which contributes to the high price tags on prescription drugs. "
  • "Because prescription products must go through so much testing before being allowed to be sold, they usually contain stronger ingredients. Not only are the products stronger, they usually contain ingredients that are not yet FDA approved to be sold OTC."
Quotes
  • "The FDA addresses the use of drugs and cosmetics under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, which was enacted in 1938 and has been amended numerous times since then. The text of this act draws a distinction between “cosmetics” and “drugs” that provides relatively definitive guidance on this topic. A cosmetic is defined as a product that is “intended to be rubbed, poured, sprinkled or sprayed on, introduced into, or otherwise applied to the human body ... for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance.” Obviously, many products that are commonly used in medical spas and medical aesthetics fall under this category. Drugs, meanwhile, are “articles (other than food) intended to affect the structure or any function of the body of man or other animals.” Therefore, the legal difference between a cosmetic skincare product and a skincare drug is the product's intended use."
  • "“If you say you're going to eliminate fine lines and wrinkles, that claim—which alters the form and function and structure of the body—is a medical claim and, therefore, that product is considered a drug by the FDA. It has to be approved and regulated, and there's a long process to get through,” explains Rob Trow, CEO of DermaConcepts, the exclusive US distributor of Environ Skin Care. “If you say that the skincare product will improve the appearance or look of fine lines and wrinkles, that's not a medical claim, and therefore it's not a prescription product and can be sold without it.” Drugs must be approved by the FDA, while cosmetics do not need approval, so a few words in a product's description can make an enormous difference for the manufacturer."
  • "The concentrations of certain chemicals and compounds in a product also can determine whether it is a cosmetic or a drug. For example, a product with a 2% concentration of hydroquinone is considered cosmetic, while one with a 4% concentration is considered a prescription drug."
Quotes
  • "Top 5 trends: 1. Pimple power 2. Skin tech 4.0 3. A microbial future 4. Filtered by lifestyle 5. Shaking up sunscreen"
  • "Top 5 skin care countries, value and growth, 2019 China $35.3 B US. $21.6 B Japan. $17.9 B Germany. $5.3 B Brazil. $3.5 B"
  • "Skin care continues to dazzle as one of beauty’s fastest growing categories, but the demands on brands are intensifying just as rapidly. The challenges are numerous, ranging from the need to adapt to the changing perceptions of ingredients to expectations on sustainability as well as addressing diversity and inclusivity, connecting with consumers more closely and demonstrating authenticity and transparency, all while being a brand that makes the consumer’s pulse quicken."
  • "‘Clean’ skin care has been winning over the past year .... Dozens of brands have jumped on the bandwagon to claim a ‘non-toxic’ or ‘chemical-free’ positioning. But equally, the market has been challenged by the lack of clarity as to what constitutes ‘clean’ beauty. "
  • "But as ‘skip-care’ replaced laborious 10-step Korean skin care routines in 2019, and streamlined skin care routines have taken preference, this too has opened up fresh opportunities, as identified by Cosmetics Business in ‘The Conscious Beauty Diet’ trend forecast report."
  • "“There will be a refocus on multifunctional, higher quality products that really perform. Less is definitely more in 2020,” says Vaus. Abi Cleeve, founder of skin care brand SkinSense, agrees: “Products offering multi-tiered solutions that save time and money and mitigate environmental impact will find a sustainable audience."
  • "Slow beauty and skip-care has come to the fore, yet it remains a fast-paced category that continually churns out new products. Natural skin care has been booming, while science-led skin care that mimics dermatological results has simultaneously thrived. But the one consistent theme is that skin care, as a category, continues to boom throughout the world."
  • "Brands have also spotted the opportunity to offer more inclusive lines within skin care.... A strong movement to celebrate and support diverse skin types has emerged, with brands including Urban Skin Rx and Virginia Stone creating products for a range of different skin tones."
  • "“More brands are also addressing women over the age of 45, as well as focusing on specific concerns like menopause,” adds Milner-Walker. These include brands such as Perricone MD and Neal’s Yard Remedies, as well as new entries such as SeeMe Beauty, a US skin care line set up by three P&G employees in 2019 for women in their 40s and 50s who are noticing changes in their skin as estrogen levels decline."
  • "Equally, brands are focusing on ‘period skin’ as the feminine care movement comes to the fore with ranges like Amareta offering products for use at different stages through the cycle."
  • "Acne care has also been revisited as the skin positivity movement spurs more brands to hone in on acne acceptance through their campaigns, and the development segment has become a target for high-level innovation from both established beauty brands like Neutrogena and Oriflame and start-ups such as Starface, ZitSticka, Blume and Squish Beauty, as research shows that breakouts and adult acne are becoming increasing concerns for consumers."
  • "Microbiome skin care has blossomed in recent years, and, frequently referred to as skin care’s biggest trend, beauty and personal care heavyweights are ploughing millions into research and new products, while independent brands are also pushing to take a pioneering role in the market. "Our understanding of how ingredients can alter and affect the microbiome has changed the way formulators create skin care products and has additionally encouraged innovation from raw material vendors.”"
  • "As skin care shifts towards taking a more individual and specific approach to responding to consumers’ needs, brands have an opportunity to build a closer relationship with their customers. And this will be a key factor for the future growth of the skin care market."
  • "Trend #1: Pimple power. With 95% of people between the ages of 11 and 30 being affected by acne to some extent, according to the NHS, acne is overwhelmingly normal, and it is now finally being perceived that way too. Thanks to a radical shift in the portrayal of the skin condition on social media and in magazines, acne is “no longer seen as a condition to be airbrushed away,” says Lucie Greene in the Light Years 2020 report."
  • "Trend #2: Skin tech 4.0 Personalisation is the crystal ball of skin care. From skin-analysing mirrors to DNA-based prescribed face care, over the past five years this growing sector has started to shine a light on the possible directions the industry will travel to arrive at the future of skin care. The latest evolution brings personalisation into the home, with skin tech devices that deliver freshly formulated and individually tailored skin care for immediate use – a breakthrough that moves the trend to the next level from both a technological and formulatory perspective. Research from Forrester reveals that 77% of consumers have chosen, recommended or paid more for a personalised service or experience, and Nick Vaus, partner of Free The Birds says that there is “a huge opportunity available to fulfil these consumer needs and desires.”"
  • "Trend #3: A microbial future Across the industry, microbiome skin care has been declared the next big thing in beauty. “I think we can bet that in a couple of years it will be a must-have in beauty,” says Laureline Beauvais, Marketing Director of L’Occitane Group’s personalised skin-tech startup DuoLab. So influential is this industry trend that the skin care market is constantly buzzing with new active ingredients, emerging specialist brands and products, range reformulations, announcements of research partnerships and acquisitions, as indie brands and legacy companies alike take a stake in its future. As many as nine in ten US millennials say they have tried or would like to try probiotics in facial skin care products, according to Mintel. “Yet there still remains a perception gap,” says Vaus."
  • "Trend #4: Filtered by lifestyle Online retailer Cult Beauty has also noticed a consumer shift towards skin care that focuses on specific lifestyle concerns – and a surge of new brands are responding to exactly that. The category has seen a metoric rise in brands focusing on specific concerns, from ‘period skin care’ from brands like Amareta and Faace (see Brand Spotlight) to brands focusing on acne (see Trend 1), and skin tone rather than skin type, such as luxury brand Virginia Stone. Plenaire, for example, was founded by Namrata Kamdar who, having a young daughter, noticed that Gen Z was being largely ignored by retailers, so launched a line dedicated to consumers from the age of 15."
  • "Trend #5: Shaking up sunscreen As the spotlight shines on rising temperatures and ocean-safe ingredients, as consumers grow more knowledgeable about sun-induced ageing and skin cancer, and as product expectations evolve, new opportunities are emerging in sunscreen. As more consumers prioritise sun protection, expect to see a rise in beautifying and sustainable sunscreen solutions that fit seamlessly with a luxurious skin care regime.” protecting the skin from the damaging effects of the sun has become a necessity in even traditionally temperate climates and for extended parts of the year. Changes are also being seen within retail and in new regulations that are being introduced in some parts of the world. “As of 2020, Walgreens will no longer sell sun care products below SPF15. Meanwhile, Hawaii and Key West have banned the sale of sunscreen containing the coral-harming chemicals oxybenzone and octinoxate, with similar bills going through other US states’ legislatures,” says Vaus. Proving your credentials to consumers is key, and Ultrasun took a step ahead earlier this year by becoming the world’s first sun care brand to be awarded the ocean-friendly credential EcoSun Pass. Abi Cleeve, MD of Ultrasun UK, tells Cosmetics Business that this meant “going beyond the absence of four identified ingredients to meet ‘Reef Friendly’ status to address the whole picture from ocean to soil and endocrine considerations”."
Quotes
  • "TRANSPARENT PRICING & THE GROWTH OF ‘MASSTIGE’ BEAUTY MEETS WELLNESS BIG TECH IN BEAUTY INGREDIENT TRANSPARENCY VIRTUAL TRY-ON UNBUNDLING THE SPA & SALON"
  • "Product Development Connected beauty systems proliferate Big beauty incubates its own disruptors, ramps up tech acquisitions A post-Fenty society: expanding the definition of inclusive beauty Beauty goes global…and local Manufacturing Evidence-based skin analysis Beauty starts at the lab … and the farm Beauty manufacturing M&A on the rise The race towards sustainable packaging Pricing & Distribution Beauty pricing becomes transparent Alternative retailers bet on beauty Marketing & Merchandising Beauty further integrates with the wellness economy Big tech and beauty Ingredient transparency trumps clean beauty Customer Experience Virtual try-on becomes point of differentiation for beauty brands Unbundling of the spa & salon continues"
Quotes
  • "Biologic agents or protein-based drugs are increasingly used in dermatology for treatment of psoriasis. These products have also gained traction in the treatment of other inflammatory skin diseases. Treatment of psoriasis is the largest area of development for dermatological biologics. There are around 10 approved biologics in the dermatological products market to treat moderate to severe psoriasis."
  • "With the rise in melanoma cases worldwide, the demand for dermatological products including sunscreen and creams have increased. Manufacturers in dermatological products market are also focusing on developing sunscreen products with SPF between 15 and 50 to provide better protection against damaging UV radiation."
  • "Hence, the rise in surgical procedures worldwide is driving the demand for scar treatment products in dermatological products market. Manufacturers in the dermatological products market are focusing on developing silicon gels and mild skin products that can reduce the appearance of the scars. Moreover, Obesity and sedentary lifestyle are the main causes of stretch marks these days. Rising consciousness among pregnant women highly prone to stretch marks is also driving the demand for various stretch mark products including oil and cream in the dermatological products market worldwide."
Quotes
  • "LATISSE® is the first and only FDA-approved prescription treatment for inadequate or not enough eyelashes, growing them longer, fuller and darker. LATISSE® solution is a growth treatment for lashes. It’s the only FDA-approved treatment clinically proven to grow lashes. And it’s the only lash growth product of its kind available by prescription"
  • "Nu-Derm is the #1 physician-dispensed skincare system, clinically proven to help reduce the signs of skin aging. It is specifically formulated for all skin types to restore beautiful, healthy-looking skin. Recommended with confidence since 1988, the Nu-Derm System has everything you need to begin your transformation."
  • "TRETINOIN A prescription topical treatment for acne vulgaris. Available in 3 strengths of Cream:0.025%, 0.05%, and 0.1%; and one strength of Gel: 0.05%. Valid prescription required. Please see Important Safety Information below and Prescribing Information for Tretinoin Cream and Gel."
Quotes
  • "Retinoids, which are topical or oral products related to Vitamin A, are present in many skincare products and treatments. The functionality of this ingredient is used to treat aging, wrinkles, acne and hyperpigmentation. Retinoids, most commonly known as Retinol, are available by prescription. There are professional-grade Retinol skin care products available in creams, lotions, serums and even some moisturizers. Retinoids, an anti-aging miracle for skin, have the ability to repair photodamaged skin, encourage collagen production, and smooth fine lines and wrinkles by encouraging cellular turnover."
  • ""
Quotes
  • "Consumers are becoming more concerned to avoid parabens as an ingredient from their skin care products. With the growth of organic products, synthetic compounds like propylparaben and butylparaben are not considered to be safe to be used. Just 35% of beauty products contain parabens, down nearly 7 points over the last two year"
  • "Competitive Landscape The global organic skin care product market is highly fragmented. L’Oreal leads the skincare product market, followed by Unilever, Procter & Gamble, Johnson & Johnson, Estee Lauder, Beiersdorf and other companies. The major organic skin care brands vary slightly from the overall cosmetic industry mainly because top brands such as Procter & Gamble (P&G), Unilever and Johnson & Johnson have very limited presence in the organic and natural product domain. "
Quotes
  • "Dr. Linda M. Katz, director of the Food and Drug Administration's Office of Cosmetics and Colors stated that "Consumers should not necessarily assume that an 'organic' or 'natural' ingredient or product would possess greater inherent safety than another chemically identical version of the same ingredient. In fact, 'natural' ingredients may be harder to preserve against… contamination and growth than synthetic versions" (Source: New York Times, November 1, 2007)."
  • "Many natural, organic ingredients used in skincare products can cause significant skin sensitivities that build up over time. Some of them can also be harsh and abrasive on skin. "
  • "All fragrance, whether synthetic or natural, causes trouble for skin. Essential oils may be good for your nose, but they’re a serious problem for your skin."
  • "All of the following common natural ingredients can be a problem for skin in one way or the other. Alcohol Allspice Almond extract Angelica Arnica Balm mint oil Balsam Basil Bergamot Cinnamon Citrus juices or oils Clove Clover blossom Coriander oil Cottonseed oil Cypress Fennel Fir needle Geranium oil Grapefruit Ground up nuts Horsetail Lavender oil Lemon Lemon balm Lemongrass Lime Marjoram Oak bark Papaya Peppermint Rose Rosemary Sage Thyme Witch hazel Wintergreen Ylang ylang "
  • "Since the list of problematic natural ingredients is so long, you may be wondering what are the best natural ingredients for skin. There are many! Here are the top ones that have only beneficial properties and none of the bad: Clays Chamomile Bisabolol Seaweed Kaolin Amino acids Ceramides Hyaluronic acid Grapes Green tea Chocolate Licorice Oats Soy Willow Herb Coconut oil Safflower oil Canola oil Shea butter Honey Mica Olive oil Sunflower Oil Argan oil Carnauba wax Meadowfoam Rice Bran oil Turmeric Rosa canina Fruit oil Palm oil Omega fatty acids Corn oil Glycerin Lecithin Aloe vera Jojoba oil Pomegranate Algae extracts Sea whip extract Feverfew extract Bearberry Mulberry White tea Cocoa butter Sesame oil Borage oil Ubiquinone Acai oil Vitamin E Vitamin B3 Goji Berry Coffeeberry extract Evening Primrose oil Tamanu Oil Curcumins Silybum marianum extract "
  • "Be sure to look for opaque, non-jar packaging that minimizes exposure to these elements. Then you’ll be getting the most benefit from the natural, organic ingredients that can truly help you get (and keep) the skin you want."
Quotes
  • "1. Clean Beauty, for Better or Worse, Is Sticking Around 2. CBD Beauty Is Getting Even Bigger in 2020 3. Sustainable, or Green, Beauty Will Remain on Trend 4. Skin Care Will Get Even More Personalized, Thanks to Technology 5. Noninvasive Aesthetics Will Become More Widely Available"
Quotes
  • "Over-the-counter (OTC) topical products commonly are discussed during dermatology encounters. Unsurprisingly, dermatologists recommend OTC topical formulations at the highest rate of all medical specialists.1,2"
  • "Many OTC products are categorized as drugs, including topical steroids, antimicrobials, and sunscreens.3 Most of these products previously were available by prescription and became available OTC after sufficient postmarketing safety information.4 "
  • " the safety of chemical sunscreens is being re-evaluated in light of recent data demonstrating serum levels in humans above the FDA limit for drugs exempt from further testing for carcinogenicity and reproductive and developmental effects.6-8"
Quotes
  • "For seven years running, dermatologists rank as the number one influencer among 15 factors that impact consumers' decisions to have a cosmetic procedure. Consumers also rated dermatologists as the top resource for skin care product decisions and physician of choice in five of 10 treatment categories including injectable wrinkle-relaxers; soft-tissue fillers; laser / light therapy for skin redness, tone and scars; vein treatments; and tattoo removal."