Overactive Bladder Disease

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Overactive Bladder Disease

Key Takeaways

  • By 2012, the prevalence of overactive bladder (OAB) in the United States was 23.2%.
  • Three main hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathophysiology of OAB. These are the urothelium-based hypothesis, the neurogenic hypothesis, and the myogenic hypothesis.
  • Treatments that were first approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1972 are still used as a treatment for OAB. However, other drugs and therapeutic options have emerged since, and new drugs are currently being developed.

Introduction

Overactive bladder (OAB) is considered a prevalent condition worldwide and in the United States. The etiology of this condition is not fully understood; however, three different mechanisms have been proposed to explain its pathophysiology. Numerous treatments have emerged during the past two decades, including anticholinergic drugs and combination therapy, which has led to an update on treatment guidelines. Additional information can be found in the attached presentation.

Overview of Overactive Bladder

  • According to a study, the prevalence of OAB among women in the United States was 30%.
  • The pathophysiology of OAB is not entirely understood. However, the three hypotheses that have been proposed involve the urothelium-based mechanism, a myogenic mechanism, and a neurogenic mechanism. These could all be present at the same time.
  • Oxybutynin was one of the first drugs approved for the treatment of OAB. For over two decades, it was the gold standard in OAB treatment.

Research Strategy

For this research on overactive bladder, we leveraged the most reputable sources of information that were available in the public domain, including papers published by academic journals such as Current Bladder Dysfunction Reports, Research and Reports in Urology, as well as data published by the American Urological Association. While we aimed for epidemiological data from the last five years we were unable to find recent surveys, polls, and cohort studies in the United States. We searched through reputable scientific journals, census data, press reports, and epidemiological reports. Due to the lack of data, we expanded our search until we epidemiology data for the United States that had been published during the last decade.
Sources
Sources