Ornithology Programs at Higher Education Institutes in the United States

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Ornithology Programs at Higher Education Institutes in the United States

We have leveraged the comprehensive source we found in the initial hour of research and have provided, for the list of United States Universities and Colleges contained in the Wilson Ornithological Society guide to graduate studies in ornithology in North America, the names of the University/College, the website link, any other useful links we think might be of interest, 1-2 points of contact for their ornithology programs/departments, along with their email address and phone number. Where we could, and it was available, we prioritized those people whose bio's stated they worked directly with waterfowl.

We want to note that for many of these links we have provided for the contacts, the major research projects that these people are working on are provided, and in some cases, with even more granularity, the links highlight those projects that are specifically about waterfowl. We could not expand upon those, synthesize them, and place them in the spreadsheet, as this would have taken this project completely out of scope, given the fact that we dealt with 69 higher education institutions.

While the entire presentation can be viewed in the custom Google Spreadsheet, we have presented a few highlights below from three universities.

The University of Connecticut, Storrs

  • Chris S. Elphick works in the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Connecticut, Storrs. He specializes in saltmarsh birds, birds in agricultural settings, studies of endangered and introduced waterbirds.
  • Mr. Elphick's email is chris.elphick@uconn.edu and the number at which he can be contacted at is (860)486-4547.
  • Dr. John Barclay is an associate professor in the Department of Natural Resource Management and Engineering at the University of Connecticut, Storrs. He specializes in wildlife management and conservation of waterfowl including work on American Woodcock, Canada Geese, American Kestrel, Ruffed Grouse, and Greater Scaup.
  • He can be reached by phone at (860) 486-0143, by fax at (860) 486-5408, and by email at John.Barclay@uconn.edu.

Dartmouth College

  • Douglas T. Bolger is a professor with the Environmental Studies Program at Dartmouth College. He specializes in conservation biology, population ecology, and habitat requirements of birds, with emphasis on the effects of habitat fragmentation.
  • Mr. Bolger's email is douglas.t.bolger@dartmouth.edu and the phone number to contact him at is 646-1688.

Cornell University

  • Paul W. Sherman worked in (retired, but still active) the section of neurobiology and behavior at Cornell University, specializing in the behavioral ecology of many avian species, the causes and consequences of extra-pair copulations in passerines, and the costs and benefits of extreme brood parasitism (dump nesting) in hole-nesting ducks.
  • He can be reached by email at pws6@cornell.edu.
Sources
Sources