Online laptop purchases Canada

Part
01
of two
Part
01

Demographics - Canadians Purchasing Laptops Online

We were unable to find the requested demographics for Canadians that purchase laptops online. After we expanded our research to include computers and tablets, we were able to find some related information. The demographics of Canadians that purchase computers are single, males, under the age of 30, with an income in the highest quintile.

KEY FINDINGS

  • In Q1 2018, Canadians spent $1,082,000 on information processing equipment.
  • In Q2 2018, Canadians spent $949,000 on information processing equipment.
  • In Q3 2018, Canadians spent $1,203,000 on information processing equipment.
  • In Q4 2018, Canadians spent $1,439,000 on information processing equipment.
  • In Q1 2019, Canadians spent $1,089,000 on information processing equipment.

AGE

  • Canadians under the age of 30 spent $306,000 on computers and $40,000 on tablet computers in 2017, for a total of $346,000.
  • Canadians that are age 30 to 39 spent $197,000 on computers and $72,000 on tablet computers in 2017, for a total of $269,000.
  • Canadians that are age 40 to 54 spent $221,000 on computers and $80,000 on tablet computers in 2017, for a total of $301,000.
  • Canadians that are age 55 to 64 spent $166,000 on computers and $55,000 on tablet computers in 2017, for a total of $221,000.
  • Canadians 65 years old and over spent $97,000 on computers and $35,000 on tablet computers in 2017, for a total of $132,000.
  • The age group that spends the most on computers and tablet computers is 30 and under.

GENDER

Number of males that purchase computers and tablet computers, by age:

Number of females that purchase computers and tablet computers, by age:

EDUCATION LEVEL

  • After extensive research we were unable to find demographics regarding education level.

MARITAL STATUS

Single
Married
Separated
Widowed
  • Age 25-29 5,766
  • Age 20-24 3,876
  • Age 15-19 19
Divorced

INCOME LEVEL

  • In 2017, the lowest quintile before-tax household income of Canadians purchased $112,000 CND worth of computers, and $26,000 CND worth of tablet computers.
  • In 2017, the second quintile before-tax household income of Canadians purchased $105,000 CND worth of computers, and $45,000 CND worth of tablet computers.
  • In 2017, the third quintile before-tax household income of Canadians purchased $178,000 CND worth of computers, and $53,000 CND worth of tablet computers.
  • In 2017, the fourth quintile before-tax household income of Canadians purchased $200,000 CND worth of computers, and $75,000 CND worth of tablet computers.
  • In 2017, the highest quintile before-tax household income of Canadians purchased $322,000 CND worth of computers, and $95,000 CND worth of tablet computers.
  • The highest income quintile purchased the most computers and tablet computers in 2017.

OTHER USEFUL INFORMATION

  • 71% of Canadians say they own a laptop or netbook.
  • Alberta, Canada has the highest percentage of internet use.
  • 59% of Canadians age 25-44 do the most online shopping, with age 16–24 coming in second at 51%.

Research Strategy:

Strategy 1: First, we searched for any demographic information that was published by the Canadian government or other Canadian organizations and was based on laptop purchases online. Some websites we reviewed were Canada Business and Statistics Canada. We found many statistics related to business such as population, regional, and senior demographics. We also saw some statistics related to society & community, children & youth, and languages spoken. Also, the Statistics Canada websites had a multitude of statistics available, so we tried to narrow down our search and isolate the data we required. We did find the amount of money spent by Canadians on information processing equipment (which is defined as computers and other electronic equipment.) From this, we were still not able to find the educational level or any data points that answered the present question, so we were forced to move on.

Strategy 2: For this approach, we looked for any Canadian technology magazines or publications that may have mentioned the demographics of the online customer base of computer manufacturers such as HP, Dell, and Acer. Some websites we reviewed were Laptop Mag, PC Mag, and PC World. The websites listed all sorts of specifications for many laptops but nothing related to the number of units sold or the demographics of their online customers.

Strategy 3: Next, we reviewed the home websites of HP, Dell, and Acer. We hoped to find some type of investor presentation or other publication that talked about the demographics of their Canadian online laptop customers. We found multiple press releases, news articles, and financial data, but nothing talked about their online Canadian customer demographics.

Strategy 4: Since we were unable to find the information specifically for Canadians that purchased laptops online, we decided to expand our research parameters. We were able to find many statistics on computers and computer devices that were not related to purchasing them online. We reviewed some infographics and other statistic tables that mentioned purchasing computers in Canada. The information we found by expanding is included above. All information was found on the Canadian Statistic website. Although this strategy found some useful information, we only found multiple statistics that talked about computers in general. None of the data specified online vs. brick & mortar. We also couldn’t find any information on marital status or educational level.

Strategy 5: Since we were not able to find anything using the previous strategy, we tried to use some data we found to triangulate some data points needed to full answer this request. Since we identified that Alberta, Canada has the highest percentage of internet usage, we assumed they would also be more likely to make online purchases, and as such we attempted to use the demographics of the city as a proxy that we could use to identify the possible gender, marital status, and education level of Canadians that purchase laptops online. We were able to find a breakdown by gender, but nothing related to marital status or education level. Since we were unable to triangulate, we listed the information we found while researching.

Part
02
of two
Part
02

Canadians Purchasing Laptops Online - Research Timeframe

Canadian online buyers care even more heavily about generous return policies than they do about pricing or brand names and more than three quarters of them make their final purchases from Amazon. Unfortunately, we were unable to resolve a clear picture, using publicly accessible information sources, of the amount of time Canadian online laptop buyers take in making their purchase.

RELEVANT INSIGHTS

Drivers and Facts

  • Factors which influence the Online purchase decisions of Canadians are easy return policy (49 percent,) Price and promotions (34 percent,) Brand(18 percent,) Product features (18 percent,) Online reviews (14 percent,) influences and recommendations (6 percent,) Newest trends (5 percent,) and Complementary products (2 percent.)
  • Around 48 percent of Canadians prefer to buy computers and electronics online.
  • 77 percent of online shoppers in Canada purchase from Amazon.
  • Canadians in British Columbia spend the most at around $3,368 online annually, whereas households in Atlantic spend the least at around $2,340 online annually. Unfortunately, details on time spent on purchasing electronics/laptops not specified.

Time Spent

  • As of 2015, According to Canada Government, Canadians spend 30 minutes on purchasing daily, but this stat is not specific to online laptop purchases.
  • Per Statista, In 2018, Canadians spend 40.5 hours per week Online.

LAPTOP BRANDS:

FREQUENCY:

  • Per the Canada post, Canadians are shopping more frequently, and 36 percent of Online consumers purchase 2-6 purchases annually.

DEMOGRAPHICS:


Research Strategy

Initially, we started looking for information on the average time taken for a Canadian consumer to make an online laptop purchase in Canada online consumer reports, articles, press and government releases such as KPMG, Deloitte, PWC, McKinsey, Consumer Reports, 150.statcan.gc.c among others. This yielded a wealth of information on factors influencing Canadian consumers' online purchases, but nothing specific to the amount of time spent on purchasing laptops in particular.

We tried a different approach by researching top Laptop manufacturing companies with large web presences, however, we ran into difficulty isolating Canadian customers while looking at online sales data. Acer, HP, Apple, Dell, Asus, and Lenovo produce significant online consumer survey reports but fail to segment that data in a manner useful for this request and offer little insight on the number of time customers take to make their decisions.

As a final strategy, we expanded the scope of search beyond the normal limit of sources published within the last 24 month. We looked at a number of possible sources such as GlobalNews.ca, Opstart.ca, VPL.ca Ofcom.org, cira.ca, Imrg.org, and others, but no new useful insights emerged.

In the course of our research, a number of broader facts emerged relating to the generational, geographic, and overall online spending patterns of Canadians. These findings have been detailed above in the hope that they may provide some insight into the online shopping habits of Canadians.
Sources
Sources