Non-commercialized aerosolized drugs

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Non-commercialized aerosolized drugs

While there is no pre-existing information to fully answer your question, we've used the available data to pull together key findings: Pharmaceutical companies consider clinical trial data to be proprietary information and neither they nor any third party are motivated to provide lists of "failed" drugs that have not gone to market. Neither could this information be collated from the FDA's official sites. Consequently, we are unable to compile a list of aerosolized chemotherapy drugs and biologics from public sources.
Below you'll find an outline of our research methodology to better understand why information you've requested is publicly unavailable, as well as a deep dive into our findings.
METHODOLOGY
We began our search with the FDA itself, reasoning that it might have a list of drugs which were never approved and therefore would not have gone to the market. However, the FDA does not publish such a list, though it does have a list of non-approved drugs that it had to take action to remove from the market. This is not within the scope of the question and so we did not pursue this list further. However, the FDA's site did lead us to the official Clinical Trials website, which we attempted to search by narrowing the field to terminated, suspended, and withdrawn trials for chemotherapy and biologics. However, the trials listed proved to be mostly for drug cocktails and other mixed therapies. Where single drugs were tested, we were unable to find any examples of aerosolized chemotherapy or biologic drugs that had not been brought to market.
We next conducted a general search for examples of aerosolized chemotherapy or biologic drugs via Google's Scholar database. On the chemo side, we found several studies such as a 2012 paper proposing the use of inhaled chemotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer as well as a 2016 study of using aerosolized nanocarriers for the same. On the biologic side, we found for example the abstract of a 2016 paper discussing "barriers to pulmonary delivery of biologics." These and other papers we found to be either written at a very high level and were not useful in identifying drugs that had not come to the market by name or company.
Finally, we conducted a wide-reaching search for articles (whether peer-reviewed, industry, or even common interest) discussing cutting-edge medications (as our research into the scholarly material available suggested) which had for whatever reason not come to market. Despite a thorough search, we were unable to find a public source that provided a list of drugs that had not been brought to the marketplace.
USEFUL FINDINGS
According to a 2013 paper, aerosolized chemotherapy "was first used more than 30 years ago," but "the safety concerns of these studies were not thoroughly investigated and different results regarding the same drug formulations have been reported." The paper goes on to describe the damage caused by aerosolizing chemotherapy agents to the lungs and airway. It discusses in detail several chemotherapy drugs: 5-fluorouracil, Taxanes, Bevacizumab, Doxorubicin, Gemcitabine, and Nitro-camptothecine (aka 9-NC). Of these, 5-fluorouracil was tested 30 years ago and so is outside of the scope of this question, and the others have all been released to the market (for example, Gemcitabine).
The only chemo drug of the above that we cannot find evidence was released to the market (unless under a different name, which we could not rule out from the available public data) is Nitro-camptothecine. However, Nitro-camptothecine was created sometime before January 2000, and so is out of scope, and we have been unable to determine from the available study abstract the other data requested for the project spreadsheet.
On the front of aerosolized biologics, we discovered the aforementioned abstract of a 2016 paper which suggests that there have been recently approved products in this area, but that there are significant barriers to developing this type of pharmaceutical. This initially gave us high hopes of finding examples of biologics that hadn't made the cut. However, as in the case of aerosolized chemo treatments, we were unable to locate examples of studies of specific biologics that had not come to market in the public sphere.
BARRIERS TO SUCCESS
We hypothesize that pharmaceutical companies have no motivation to publish lists of their "failed" products. After all, we would argue, even a product that is not suitable for the market today might with further refinement and testing become suitable in the future, and so there is no reason to give away potentially valuable information about them. We did some digging and found that indeed, outside of Europe "clinical trial data is considered to be proprietary information, which allows pharmaceutical companies to conceal important data from the public domain." Since the extent of that privacy is outside of the scope of this question, we did not pursue further. However, this provided us with the context to why our search attempts proved so fruitless.
CONCLUSION
Due to pharmaceutical companies having a vested interest in not releasing information about drugs that they have not, for whatever reason, brought to market, we were unable to compile a list of non-commercialized aerosolized chemotherapy or biologic pharmaceuticals as requested. Consequently, we are unable to complete the project spreadsheet.
Sources
Sources