News Outlet Competitor Analyses (Facebook + YouTube)

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News Outlet Competitor Videos on Facebook Watch

Successful Facebook Watch videos from Mic competitors include NowThis Reports' "Through Our Eyes: Puerto Rico," NowThis Politics' "Who Is Stephen Miller?" and "The Racist History of Cartoons" from Slate. Below you'll find a rundown of my methodology for including these and other videos on the list and the list of videos itself, with publication dates and engagement stats for each.

OVERVIEW

I focused specifically on the new Facebook Watch platform to find the five videos below. However, that raised several challenges. Many Mic competitors don't produce Facebook Watch content, only Facebook videos; Vice, Vox Media, and several others don't have any shows on Facebook Watch.

For those competitors that do produce Watch content, view counts over 10 million are incredibly rare; I only found a few videos that crossed that threshold, only one of which (a NowThis video narrated by Debra Messing) mostly fit the other criteria of your request. Messing herself doesn't appear on camera in that video, but since it had such a high view count I included it in the list anyway. The narrator of Slate's "The Racist History of Cartoons" also doesn't appear on camera, but that video also had one of the higher view counts I found and had the highest share rate of any video I found, at 1.9%.

Low view counts for this kind of content seem like a common issue with Facebook Watch; short, viral content has so far been much more popular than original longform pieces on the platform. Users might also have trouble finding content that isn't directly surfaced by Facebook, as Watch's interface can be "cluttered" and "overlapping."

Share rates above or close to 2% were also very rare, and I wasn't able to find average watch times for any of these videos; it seems like Facebook only surfaces that information for page owners. I included comments and reactions as metrics of success in the place of watch time. Below you'll find the full list of five Facebook Watch videos from Mic competitors with view counts, dates, share rates, and other engagement statistics.

FACEBOOK WATCH VIDEOS

NowThis Reports
November 22, 2017
8.6 million views
1.7% share rate
18,000 reactions
3,000 comments

"Decoded: 5 Poverty Myths Debunked ft. The Liberal Redneck"
MTV Decoded
December 8, 2017
7.6 million views
1.1% share rate
9,400 reactions
884 comments

"Who is Stephen Miller? Narrated by Debra Messing"
NowThis Politics
August 22, 2017
12 million views
0.86% share rate
13,000 reactions
3,600 comments

Slate
October 15, 2017
8.4 million views
1.9% share rate
20,000 reactions
3,700 comments

"How the World Could End: Meltdown Earth"
NowThis
September 8, 2017
5.5 million views
1% share rate
25,000 reactions
2,100 comments

CONCLUSION

I found five examples of successful Facebook Watch content from Mic competitors like NowThis, Slate, and MTV Decoded. While only one of these videos crossed 10 million views and none had share rates over 2%, they were the most successful examples I could find on the Watch platform, where short viral content tends to be more popular than original longform news and feature pieces.
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News Outlet Competitor Videos on YouTube

Five successful videos showing news stories produced by competitors are the following :
1. "See What Happens When a Plane Violates Presidential Airspace", by Today with over 11 million views.
2. "Why No Aquarium has a Great White Shark", by Vox with over 18 million views.
4. "Meet the Dancing 'Backpack Kid' Who Stole Katy Perry's Spotlight", by Inside Edition with over 26.8 million views.
5. "Panther Sneaks Up Behind Man and Then ...", by CNN with over 17.9 million views.
In order to find successful news story videos generated by competitors in YouTube, the following criteria were checked: videos uploaded within the last two years with 10 million views or more, and featuring a clear-voiced reporter narrating the story, who was seen at least once in the video. However, the rest of the criteria, watch time and share rates, were not publicly available. These data can only be retrieved through YouTube Analytics with the authorization of the channel owners. We can just infer that the watch time might be high given the number of likes and dislikes, as compared with the number of views. The huge number of likes and dislikes for each video imply high engagement from the viewers.

SUCCESSFUL COMPETITOR NEWS STORY VIDEOS

The following are the details of the five selected videos of several competitors:
Note that watch rates and share rates can only be accessed by the channel owners so those values are not available.
1. Title: See What Happens When a Plane Violates Presidential Airspace.
• Source: Today
• Date: July 10, 2017
• Number of Views: Over 11 million views
• Likes: 46k
• Dislikes: 12k
2. Title: Why No Aquarium has a Great White Shark
• Source: VOX
• Date: July 8, 2016
• Number of Views: Over 18 million views
• Likes: 187k
• Dislikes: 8k
3. Title: Teacher Hits on Student
• Source: What Would You Do?
• Date: June 25, 2016
• Number of Views: Over 29 million views
• Likes: 112k
• Dislikes: 8k
4. Title: Meet the Dancing 'Backpack Kid' Who Stole Katy Perry's Spotlight
• Source: Inside Edition
• Date: May 22, 2017
• Number of Views: Over 26.8 million views
• Likes: 155k
• Dislikes: 11k
5. Title: Panther Sneaks Up Behind Man and Then ...
• Source: CNN
• Date: June 7, 2016
• Number of Views: Over 17.9 million views
• Likes: 91k
• Dislikes: 16k

CONCLUSION

Videos found in Youtube about news stories released by competitors were as follows: (1)"See What Happens When a Plane Violates Presidential Airspace", by Today with over 11 million views; (2) "Why No Aquarium has a Great White Shark", by Vox with over 18 million views; (3)"Teacher Hits on Student", by What Would You Do?, with over 29 million views; (4) "Meet the Dancing 'Backpack Kid' Who Stole Katy Perry's Spotlight", by Inside Edition with over 26.8 million views; and (5) "Panther Sneaks Up Behind Man and Then ...", by CNN with over 17.9 million views. These competitor videos were selected based on number of views, presence of a narrator, and some form of user engagement.

Sources
Sources