I need a recent study regarding the "tend and befriend" stress response in women.

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I need a recent study regarding the "tend and befriend" stress response in women.

Hello! Thanks for your request to provide you with a recent study regarding the "tend and befriend" stress response in women. The short version is that I have provided you with 2 scientific case studies about the "tend-and-befriend" response from credible sources published within the last 12 months.

Below you will find a deep dive of my findings.

ELSEVIER Elsevier, founded in 1880, is one of the world's major providers of scientific, technical, and medical information. They published a case study about the "tend and befriend" stress response in women, which was last revised on November of 2016.

Elsevier's case study covered the reactions of 40 participants, 21 female and 19 male, to a cold pressor stress test. All participants were then asked to rate their urge to take care of newly-born infants displayed on 20 short video clips. Half of the babies were crying while the other half were acting normally.

The case study also took note of each participant's skin conductance and salivary cortisol levels. Findings indicate that motivations for taking care of the babies were different depending on the participant's gender. Men were found to be less motivated to take care of the babies than women were, and that men had higher skin conductance afterwards.

The WBHI published an article about their findings from their research about stress. Their research indicates that women report experiencing higher stress levels than men. On a 10-point scale, women scored an average of 5.3 while men scored an average of 4.6. 23% of women were found to experience extreme stress, as opposed to only 16% of men. 45% of women (as opposed to 29% of men) were more likely to attribute their stress with fatigue, 42% (27%) with feeling nervous or anxious, 39% (28%) with feeling sad or depressed, and 34% (20%) with having headaches.

Included in the article were findings about a study that indicate a difference between the initial reactions of men from women. The study details assumptions for why women tend to respond in a tend-or-befriend manner instead of the commonly accepted fight-or-flight. Researchers suggested that this is an evolution of women's traditional role as a caregiver for children, which may have helped them in terms of survival of self and offspring. Considering how women usually had children to take care of, they could not afford to flee, nor were they capable of fighting back successfully. This has led to different development of reactions towards stressors in women.

Studies included in the article also show that 3 stress hormones, cortisol, oxytocin and epinephrine play a big role in whether a person would turn to a fight-or-flight strategy or a tend-or-befriend reaction. For both women and men, stress was found to increase cortisol and epinephrine levels, which in turn raises blood pressure and circulating blood sugar. Cortisol, if left alone, compromises immune system function.

Although women’s and men’s brains were found to both release oxytocin in response to stress, women’s brains release more.

Oxytocin is a substance known to alleviate pain and help one feel good about social interactions. It counters the effects of cortisol and epinephrine, and promotes relaxation and feelings consistent with a tend-and-befriend response.

CONCLUSION
To wrap it up, I have provided you with 2 scientific case studies about the "tend-and-befriend" response from credible sources published within the last 12 months.

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