I need an assessment of the challenges cities have preparing to manage autonomous vehicles and integrating services to meet the needs of the "smart city". Vendor references to include Sensys Network.

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I need an assessment of the challenges cities have preparing to manage autonomous vehicles and integrating services to meet the needs of the "smart city". Vendor references to include Sensys Network.

Hello! Thanks for requesting an assessment of the challenges cities face in preparing to manage autonomous vehicles (AV) and in integrating services to meet the needs of the "smart city."
The short version is that cities will need to spend on sensors and technology to cover the infrastructure needed for AVs. It is also a possibility that AVs will affect the budget of cities, since human error will diminish on the roads, and there will be fewer infractions. Integrating various services of smart cities will also be costly. Below you will find a deep dive of my findings.


CHALLENGES CITIES FACE IN PREPARING TO MANAGE AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES (AV)

Many cities do not have the time, funding and knowledge to address the challenges and opportunities of the disruptive environment that autonomous vehicles have introduced. According to Postscapes the three main needs of smart cities are sensors, networks, and engagement. It is important that cities open up to the work of qualified citizens and private sector groups. In this way cities will benefit from a combination of knowledge and from cross-industry funding, testing, piloting, and resources.

According to a report by the University of Washington, AVs will affect Seattle's budget. These cars will not run red lights, overstay at parking meters, or speed down highways. The Guardian states that many cities are funded on human error. This money is then used to fund public safety, libraries, parks, firefighters, police and more. Traffic fines account for 2.6% of this city's operating fund. Seattle will have to find new ways to make up for this loss of revenue. A suggestion from the report states that the city could introduce a mileage tax or an AV registration tax. Ken Strobeck, an executive from the League of Arizona Cities and Towns, disagrees with this argument. He states that money from traffic tickets and DUIs are not a significant source of revenue. The laws are there to promote safety and not to make money.

With the advent of AV, cities will have to install many sensors in streetlights and road bends, and a centralized processing platform will be needed to control all this data. Private enterprises may help fund some of these investments, but tax payers will have to help support these changes. Pike Research states that from 2012 to 2020, $117 billion will be invested in smart city infrastructure throughout the world. Of this amount, $31.2 billion will go to technology for the infrastructure of smart transport solutions.

AVs will provide cities with many benefits like better parking, smarter security, efficient lighting, and better traffic flow. But unifying all these different standards will be costly for cities. For cities to be succesfull in implementing these changes, they need to have a strategy that fosters collaboration across many individual verticals.

If self-driving cars become very popular, fewer people will use public transportation options that are more traffic-efficient. Consequently, AVs could lead to very long commutes. Because autonomous vehicles will be problematic for traffic in cities, authorities must have long-term plans about their transit systems. It is important for them to know whether they will redesign their entire transit system or just introduce some changes to the old infrastructure.

SENSYS NETWORK AND STREETLINE

In 2015, Sensys Network partnered with Verizon to offer a new service that would provide public transportation entities a high level of precision, signal optimization, congestion mitigation, performance reporting, and high-resolutions. Verizon’s Intelligent Traffic Management Service is seeking to change the way public entities manage and obtain data. This will help improve traffic, reduce delay, decrease greenhouse gas emissions, and decrease fuel consumption. Their service provides a large group of cloud-based programs to help agencies see where they are underperfoming, and it helps them improve. In the U.S. they have over $300,000 signalized intersections.

Streetline is a company that will be leading the transformation of many cities into "smart cities." Its Hybrid Smart Parking Platform uses existing parking data of the city to provide real-time parking guidance throughout the area.

CONCLUSION To wrap it up, cities will need to spend on sensors and technology to cover the infrastructure needed for AVs. It is also a possibility that AVs will affect the budget of cities, since human error will diminish on the roads, and there will be fewer infractions. Integrating various services of smart cities will also be costly. Thanks for using Wonder! Please let us know if we can help with anything else!
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