Music Festivals - Gender, Race and Sex

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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 2-21

We located each of the bands for rows 2-21 of the attached spreadsheet. We searched the website for information on each band as well as social media to locate information on band leader, cisgender status and LBGT status. In researching the band Aazar, the leader's name was publicly unavailable.

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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 22-41

Of the specified artists and bands, the prevailing demographic is that of cisgender Caucasian males. In total, none were found to be anti-LGBTQ, and 11 artists can be seen to be active supporters of the LGBTQ community. Please refer to the attached spreadsheet for a full depiction of these findings.

Findings

The majority of the requested information could be found through a compilation of press releases, social media profiles, and band websites. Oftentimes, LGBTQ support could be identified through a bands' attendance to relevant events. Please note that many of these resources were found to refer to the LGBTQ community using the popular variant LGBT. One notable artist to highlight is "Against Me!"s Laura Jane Grace, she has recently undergone transitioning and actively expresses her support towards the LGBTQ community.

The only limitation to this research arose in the determination of each artists' race. As this information is usually not explicitly stated, assumptions have been made as to ethnicity using a combination of birth areas and public images. As such, accuracy in this area cannot be superlative.

CONCLUSION

To summarize, the artists and bands listed in rows 22 to 41 of the provided spreadsheet have been examined through a variety of media. Many of these artists could be identified to be active LGBTQ supporters, including many cisgender males.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 42-61

Rows 42-61, columns B-F of the attached spreadsheet have been completed. For bands that are listed on the spreadsheet, the lead singer/vocalist has been identified as the group's leader as their official websites did not explicitly identify the leader. The gender and race of each leader have been identified by visually examining publicly available images of the leader. A general press search was conducted to find evidence if any of the males are not cisgender male. It was assumed that every male is a cisgender male if there are no articles that explicitly stated otherwise.
None of the leaders have taken part in anti-LGBTQ activities. For most of the leaders, there was no evidence that could verify if they are pro- or anti-LGBTQ (N/A). The leaders are considered LGBTQ activists if they have been linked to pro-LGBTQ activities such as producing music to support LGBTQ rights, performing at LGBTQ events, and talking about LGBTQ rights. Please note that sources older than two years have been used to provide evidence to verify if the leaders are pro- or anti-LGBTQ.

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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 62-81

The requested information for each musician listed in rows 62-81 of the attached spreadsheet has been added against their names.

I searched through official websites, official social media pages, and biography pages to locate most of the information regarding race and gender identity. I searched through press articles as well as official social media pages for the musicians to determine if they are activists for the LGBTQ community. Some sources are older than 2016 because they contain biographical information that does not change over time.
I did not find any musicians that were openly against the LGBTQ community, while only two of them were found to be supporting the community. The musicians that are activists, or otherwise support the community, have either openly spoken about their support or shared/posted pro-LGBTQ material on social media. For those that are marked with N/A, I was unable to find any evidence that the musicians either an LGBTQ activist, or openly against the community even after searching through articles, biographies, and social media pages.
You can find the requested information about each musician in rows 62-81 of this spreadsheet.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 82-101

The requested information for each musician listed in rows 82-101 of the attached spreadsheet has been added against their names.
I searched through official websites, official social media pages, and biography pages to locate most of the information regarding race and gender identity. I searched through press articles as well as official social media pages for the musicians to determine if they are activists for the LGBTQ community. Some sources are older than 2016 because they contain biographical information that does not change over time.
I did not find any musicians that were openly against the LGBTQ community, while only six of them were found to be supporting the community including Barns Courtney, Bassnectar, Bat for Lashes, Ben UFO, Benjamin Clementine, and Betty Who. The musicians who are activists, or otherwise support the community, have either openly spoken about their support or shared/posted pro-LGBTQ material on social media. For those that are marked with N/A, I was unable to find any evidence that the musicians either an LGBTQ activist, or openly against the community even after searching through articles, biographies, and social media pages.
You can find the requested information about each musician in rows 82-101 of this spreadsheet.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 102-121

The requested information for each requested musician has been entered into rows 102-121 of this spreadsheet. We searched through official websites and biography pages to locate most of the -information regarding race and gender identity. We searched through press articles as well as official social media pages for the artists to determine if they are activists for the LGBTQ community. Some sources are older than 2016 because they contain biographical information that does not change over time.

FINDINGS

We did not find any artists that were openly against that community. The artists that we determined are activists, or otherwise support the LGBTQ community, have either openly spoken about their support, participated in LGBTQ geared performances, or shared and posted pro-LGBTQ material on social media. For those that are marked with N/A, after searching articles, biographies, and social media pages we were still unable to find any evidence that the artist is either an LGBTQ activist, or openly against that community.
In conclusion, you can find the requested information about each artist in rows 102-121 of this spreadsheet.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 122-141

The requested information was provided on the leaders of each of the music acts in rows 122-141 of the attached spreadsheet. These acts included music acts like Blood Orange, Brandy Clark, and Bloc Party. Details on their race, status as an LGBTQ activist, and whether they are a cisgender male were provided. An overview of our findings is provided below along with a methodology.

METHODOLOGY + FINDINGS

In order to identify the requested details, a search was conducted through trusted media sites, social media accounts, event promotions, press releases, and the official websites for each musical act. Information on the race of each artist and whether the artist is a cisgender male or not was readily available.

In row 130 of the spreadsheet, the music act was listed as "Bonnie Milsap." After performing an extensive search, it was assumed that this was a typo and the intended musical artist was "Ronnie Milsap." The details provided in the spreadsheet were sourced with this in mind.

At times, it could not be determined whether a particular music artist was an LGBTQ supporter. This is likely due to the fact that the artist in question had not publicly declared their support for or against the LGBTQ community. While this was often the case, there were a few instances where the related sources indicated that the music artist is a likely supporter of the community. These instances are provided below.

Bobby Bones of Bobby Bones and the Raging Idiots has not labeled himself as an LGBTQ activist. However, when the Orlando nightclub shooting occurred, he posted on Facebook that he was "praying with and for Orlando." While this does imply that Bones is sympathetic toward the community, it does not clearly state that he is an advocate.

Liliana Saumet is the lead singer of Bomba Estéreo, a Colombian duo. Saumet has not indicated whether she is an LGBTQ supporter or not. However, her music partner, Simón Mejía, has voiced his support for gay rights. He has been quoted as saying that "everyone has the right to marry and fall in love with the person they want, regardless of whether they are of the same sex or not." While it cannot be assumed that she share's the same opinions as her music partner, it is a possibility.

In the case of Borgore, there is no record of him declaring his support for the LGBTQ community, however, in a recent interview he did mention that he was working on a "gay pop song." This does not prove that he is an activist but it does offer insight into his views. Without precise details for these examples, each act was marked as "N/A" in the spreadsheet.

On the other hand, it is clear that Boyfriend, a female rapper, is an LGBTQ supporter. She performs at gay pride events and hides her real name while only going by her stage name. Breakbot is also a gay rights supporter. While it is clear that Breakbot is a supporter, the most recent record of this was a Facebook post from 2012. In the post, Breakbot links to an article about fighting for same-sex marriage. While this source is outside of the standard two-year time frame of a Wonder request, it was included for its relevancy.

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, information on the leaders of several music acts was compiled in rows 122-141 of the attached spreadsheet. This information includes details on whether each leader is a cisgender male, whether they are Caucasian, and whether they are an LGBTQ activist or supporter.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 142-161

The requested information for each requested musician has been entered into rows 142-161 of this spreadsheet. We searched through official websites and biography pages to locate most of the information regarding race and gender identity. We searched through press articles as well as official social media pages for the artists to determine if they are activists for the LGBTQ community. Some sources are older than 2016 because they contain biographical information that does not change over time.

Findings

We did not find any artists that were openly against that community. The artists that we determined are activists, or otherwise support the LGBTQ community, have either openly spoken about their support, participated in LGBTQ geared performances, or shared and posted pro-LGBTQ material on social media. For those that are marked with N/A, after searching articles, biographies, and social media pages we were still unable to find any evidence that the artist is either an LGBTQ activist, or openly against that community.

In conclusion, you can find the requested information about each artist in rows 142-161 of this spreadsheet.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 162-181

The requested information was provided on the leaders of each of the music acts in rows 162-181 of the attached spreadsheet. These acts included names like Carrie Underwood, Calvin Harris, and Cashmere Cat. Details on their race, status as an LGBTQ activist, and whether they are a cisgender male were provided. An overview of our findings is provided below along with a methodology.

METHODOLOGY + FINDINGS

In order to find the requested details, a search was conducted through social media accounts, trusted media sites, press releases, event promotions, and the official websites for each musical act. Details were available on each artist as to whether they were a cisgender male or not. The race for each music artist was also readily available.

In some cases, it was unclear whether some music acts are LGBTQ supporters. This was either a result of limited information, like in the case of the mysterious Carpenter Brut, or there was simply no record of an artist's stance on gay rights. Often, the case was the latter.

However, some sources indicated that it was likely that the artist supported gay rights despite the fact that the artist themselves had not gone on record declaring it. An example of this can be seen with the case of Calvin Harris. While he has not been quoted as being a supporter of LGBTQ rights, he did receive media attention around the subject. When Australia legalized gay marriage, a story broke out. This story alleged that he had made a promise that he would celebrate by remixing a Spice Girls song if gay marriage was legalized in Australia. Harris never responded to these claims.

On the other hand, in the case of Cardi B, while she has not been quoted as being against LGBTQ rights, she has defended people who have made negative statements about the gay community. Her fiance, Offset, wrote a disparaging lyric in one of his songs that stated, "I cannot vibe with queers." When this occurred, Cardi asked fans to educate him. She claimed that they were not against the LGBTQ community and that he was not aware of how his words would be perceived. While this does not indicate that she is pro-gay rights, it does not exactly prove that she is against the gay community either.

Another example can be found with the DJ collective, Cash Cash. While there is no record of this group claiming to be gay rights supporters, it is likely that they are. This is due to the fact that Cash Cash has worked with openly gay musicians and has been featured in gay publications. Cash Cash remixed Troye Sivan's new single and have appeared in Out Magazine. In each of these instances, the musical act was marked as "N/A" since precise details could not be found.

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, information on the leaders of various music acts was compiled in rows 162-181 of the attached spreadsheet. This information includes details such as whether each leader is a cisgender male, whether they are Caucasian, and whether they are an LGBTQ activist or supporter.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 182-201

We located each of the bands for rows 182-201 of the attached spreadsheet. We searched the website for information on each band, as well as their social media accounts, to locate information on the band leader's cisgender status and LBGT status. Race was determined using photographs, plus any relevant information included in media articles. In order to ascertain whether the band leader in question could be considered an LGBTQ activist, we conducted advanced research to find press or other mentions linking this person to LGBTQ activism.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 202-221

The requested information for each bandleader has been entered into rows 202-221 of the attached spreadsheet. Most of the band leaders have not openly expressed their LGBTQ views.

FINDINGS


We found the information needed on band websites and social media accounts. To determine LGBTQ activism, we looked at events the artists either participated or performed in. We also looked at articles depicting their LGBTQ views. Assumptions have been made about race based on birthplaces and pictures. While some of these bandleaders use only stage names, their birth names have also been entered.
Claude Vonstroke was found twice on the spreadsheet. We decided to enter information on this artist once. "N/A" was chosen for the other.
Claptone IMMORTAL LIVE is a show by the artist - Claptone. Information on this artist was already entered. Therefore, "N/A" was selected for the event itself.
In conclusion, the requested information regarding the artists can be found in rows 202-221 of the attached spreadsheet. 
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 222-241

We have provided the requested information for the band/group leaders for each of the acts in rows 222-241 of the attached spreadsheet.
We found all the groups listed in rows 222-241 and provided information for all the leaders of the groups. Where the leader of a group isn't clearly stated on their group website, we assumed the lead singer/vocalist was the leader of the group and provided the requested information for the leader. We were able to find evidence on whether each of the leaders was a cisgender male and if the leader was Caucasian for all the leaders.
For most of the leaders, however, we were unable to find evidence to determine if they supported LGBTQ cause nor oppose the cause, so we entered N/A as instructed. We searched the leaders' social media posts, media reports, interviews they have given, and causes they have supported through their performance to determine if they are an LGBTQ activist or not. We have provided relevant sources in the spreadsheet.
You can access the completed spreadsheet here.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 242-261

As requested, rows 242-261 of the attached spreadsheet have been completed.

Despite searching through iTunes, Spotify and other search techniques, there does not appear to be any band by the name of CVN. Therefore, this row (243) has been filled with all "N/A"s.

For ascertaining whether a person was cisgender male, we first identified them from photos and personal pronouns used in media articles, then did a search as to whether they had identified as transgender or other. None of the artists in question were non-cisgender males, except for female leads Elena Tonra and Grace Martine Tandon.

Race was determined using photographs, plus any relevant information included in media articles.

In order to ascertain whether the band leader in question could be considered an LGBTQ activist, we conducted an advanced research to find press or other mentions linking this person to LGBTQ activism. None in this set were linked to any LGBTQ awareness or activism except for Elena Tonra, Jackson Phillips and Grace Martine Tandon.

In summary, please find all relevant information on the attached spreadsheet.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 262-281

The rows of 262-281 have been updated on the attached spreadsheet. The information was found using news articles, band websites, popular industry publications, band announcements, social media accounts, biographies, and press releases. We located the information on band leaders, cisgender status, race, and any LGBTQ support as well as the accompanying sources.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 282-301

We located each of the bands for rows 282-301 of the attached spreadsheet. We searched news articles, press releases, and the band's websites for information on each band as well as social media and the identified leader's biographies to locate information on band leader's cisgender status, race, and any LGBTQ support.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 302-321

Of the 20 musicians researched for this request—15 of whom are Caucasian—18 are cisgender males whilst 1 is a cisgender female and another identifies as gender neutral.

An extensive search of the public domain revealed that 4 artists are, or could be perceived as, LGBTQ activists by their statements or activities. For example:

—Participating in projects where LGBTQ rights are a focus.
—Promoting inclusiveness in states with transphobic laws.
—Speaking publicly about gender in an affirmative manner.

FINDINGS

Whilst this is a slightly older article published in December 2016, it relates directly to Dua Lipa's views and beliefs on the LGBTI community and desire to promote inclusiveness without being politically heavy-handed.

DuckwrthJared Lee—has made it his focus to celebrate difference and "embrace [...] flaws." He talks about collaborating with Mette Towley and how, as people and artists, they "defy gender norms."

In May 2016, Simon Le Bon of Duran Duran chose to support the North Carolina community, under the "NC Needs You" movement, as an opportunity to oppose transphobic laws introduced by the state.

Durand Jones participated in the collaborative album, "Our First 100 Days," with all proceeds being donated to causes the artists firmly believe in, including "Southerners on New Ground", an LGBTI activist group. Durand Jones & The Indications contribution was the song—Power to the People.

We also note that a further artist, E. Feld, plays at gay venues. Though no public information or statements regarding activism in this area could be found, it could be reasonably presumed that E. Feld is, at least, comfortable with the LGBTQ community.

CONCLUSION

Whilst our search only identified 4 artists active in supporting LGBTQ rights, we found no artist who publicly expressed anti-LGBTQ sentiments. The information on the 20 artists in rows 302 to 321 can be found in the attached spreadsheet.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 322-341

We updated rows 322-341 of the attached spreadsheet with the requested information about 20 band leaders. Only Daniel Lee aka Tablo, leader of Epik High, is not Caucasian. Also, we could not determine Elohim's race, which we will explain below. 11 band leaders are cisgender male and seven can be considered LGBT activists.

METHODOLOGY

COLUMN B
We identified the leaders by searching articles in the industry media and "About" sections on official websites. We found straightforward answers for all of the bands except Eli and Fur. As they are a producer duo, their positions are equal. We included both names in the spreadsheet. Eliza Noble and Jennifur Skillman are both female and Caucasian, and they are not LGBT activists.

Please note that when applicable, we provided both birth names and the ones under which the artists perform.

COLUMN C
We also referenced articles in the music media. We entered "yes" for those band leaders for whom the press uses media pronouns.

COLUMN D
Unless there was a direct statement available in interviews or articles in the music media, we searched for the place of birth on official websites or in the media and analyzed the photos to determine the race. In case of Elohim, we were unable to do it. The artist is very secretive. She does not reveal personal information, and there are few high-quality photos of her face. While it seems that she is Caucasian, there is no sufficient proof, which is why we decided to enter "N/A" in the appropriate cell.

COLUMN E
We entered "yes" for those musicians who gave direct statements of support for the LGBTQ community, performed at large LGBT events, and/or took part in any other LGBTQ initiatives. For the others, we searched for any indications that they do not support LGBTQ. However, we could only convincingly answer "no" for Eminem, who was accused of being homophobic. For the rest of band leaders, we entered "N/A." Please note that Eliot Sumner is often connected with the LGBTQ community, because she identifies herself as gender fluid, but she has never expressed her support.

We tried to gather the requested information from the most recent articles available. However, when it was not available in sources from the last two years, we used older ones, as it is not time-sensitive.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 342-361

I have compiled the requested information on the attached spreadsheet rows 342-361. For each band, I have noted the leader including the additional information requested, however, in some cases there were just names and not bands. Most of the information was contained in their websites. I also sourced some details regarding their biographies from external sources like press releases, celebrity news websites and social media pages to help determine whether these musicians are LGBT activists, including their stance on LGBTQ issues.

FINDINGS

Most of the artists appear to have positive views regarding the LGBTQ community. In fact, some women bandleaders remain very vocal in championing for the rights of the LGBTQ community. In particular, Florence Welch, during the How Beautiful Tour at the Brooklyn's Barclays Center held a rainbow flag and chanted "Love is love is love is love!" to show support for the LGBT community. On the other hand, Curt Cameruci, commonly known as Flosstradamus, claimed publicly on Twitter that "I am not gay no more...I am delivered."

I have marked "YES" for those artists and bands that support LGBT views, "NO" for those who have openly denounced it and "N/A" for those I could not authenticate whether they have positive or negative views.

To wrap up, you can find the requested information on each band and / or artist on the attached spreadsheet rows 342-361.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 362-381

Rows 362-381, columns B-F of the attached spreadsheet have been completed. For bands that are listed on the spreadsheet, the lead singer/vocalist has been identified as the group's leader if their official websites did not explicitly identify the leader. The gender and race of each leader have been identified by visually examining publicly available images of the leader. A general press search was conducted to find evidence if any of the males are not cisgender male. It was assumed that every male is a cisgender male if there are no articles that explicitly stated otherwise.
None of the leaders have taken part in anti-LGBTQ activities. For most of the leaders, there was no evidence that could verify if they are pro- or anti-LGBTQ (N/A). The leaders are considered LGBTQ activists if they have been linked to pro-LGBTQ activities such as posting pro-LGBTQ messages on social media, voicing support for pro-LGBTQ campaigns, and performing at LGBTQ events. Please note that sources older than two years have been used to provide evidence to verify if the leaders are pro- or anti-LGBTQ.

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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 382-401

The requested information for each bandleader has been entered into rows 382-401 of the attached spreadsheet. More than half of the artists listed are Caucasians. Most of the band leaders have not openly expressed their LGBTQ views.

We found the information needed on band websites and social media accounts. To determine LGBTQ activism, we looked at events the artists either participated or performed in. We also looked at articles depicting their LGBTQ views. Assumptions have been made about race based on birthplaces and pictures. While some of these bandleaders use only stage names, their birth names have also been entered.

In conclusion, the requested information regarding the artists can be found in rows 382-401 of the attached spreadsheet.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 402-421

The requested information for each artist or group leader has been entered into rows 402-421 of the attached spreadsheet. Almost three-quarters of the selected artists or group leaders are Caucasian cisgender males. Most have shown support for LGBTQ rights, and a number of the listed artists are openly gay or bisexual.

METHODOLOGY

We found the information needed on group websites, media interviews, music industry sites and social media accounts. To determine LGBTQ activism, we looked at events the artists performed in, interviews and posts on social media. Assumptions have been made about race based on birthplaces and photographs of the artists.

FINDINGS

The majority of the selected artists and group leaders are cisgender males by a small margin. Most showed support for LGBTQ rights based on online sources, and none were found to be anti-LGBTQ. Several are openly gay or bisexual including Griz, GRYFFIN, Halsey, Hannah Wants and Hayley Kiyoka. Only three did not appear to be Caucasian; Radric Davis AKA Gucci Mane who is black, and Ashley Frangipane AKA Halsey and Hayley Kiyoko who are mixed race. Please refer to rows 402-421 of the attached spreadsheet for full details and sources.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 422-441

We have completed rows 422-441 of your spreadsheet, which covers the following bands:
HEALTH
Helado Negro
Heron Oblivion
Hermitude
Herobust
Hey Marseilles
Hiatus Kaiyote
Highly Suspect
Hinds
Hippie Sabotage
Hippo Campus
Hiss Golden Messenger
HITO
Holly Miranda
Honey Dijon
HONNE
Hot Flash Heat Wave
Hot Since 82
How To Dress Well
Hudson Mohawke

In total, 13 leaders of these bands were found to be cisgender males, 17 were found to be Caucasian, and seven were found to be LBGTQ activists/supporters, while none were found to be anti-LBGTQ.

Methodology

In order to locate these findings, we analyzed each of the bands within their respective section of the spreadsheet. For each band, we first analyzed their band members to identify the leader. For this, we defaulted to the lead singer/lead musician of the band, unless a more prominent leader could be identified, such as a founder of the band.

To determine if the band leaders were cisgender males, we searched through trusted media articles on the music industry and LGBTQ community to determine if there was any existing evidence showing that the band leader was not a cisgender male. For example, a band leader who stated in an interview that they were transgender.

To determine race, we conducted visual analysis of the band leaders to determine if they could be considered Caucasian.

To determine if the band leaders were LGBTQ activists, we looked for any instances where they were expressing positive sentiments towards the LGBTQ community, and also conducted research to explore whether the band leaders were members of the community themselves. We also looked for any instances were the band leaders were expressing anti-LGBTQ sentiments. In doing so, we analyzed trusted media articles, interviews, and social media sites.

CONCLUSION

In closing, we have completed rows 422-441 of the attached spreadsheet.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 442-461

Only seven band leaders in rows 442-461 of the attached spreadsheet have known LGBTQ-related views, with all seven supporting LGBTQ rights. All the requested information for rows 442-461 of the attached spreadsheet has been generated, with the sources below (also compiled in column F).

The majority of the information was found on each band's website, although to determine whether band leaders were cisgender males, I often used interviews that illustrated the use of male pronouns in reference to the leaders. Race was determined by cross-referencing each band leader's place of birth with their photos. If a band leader was not identified by title, the lead singer was selected as the default leader. If there was no lead singer, and a group considered all members equal, I used the person most prominently featured in interviews or on social media as the leader.

To determine whether a band leader is an LGBTQ activist, I searched social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for any evidenice of support or lack thereof. In several cases, media mentions of a leader's pro- or anti-LGBTQ stance were used to determine a leader's activism. It should also be noted that I took a liberal view of "activist" in the research process. For example, leaders who tweeted pro-LGBTQ sentiments were marked as activists, as were those who performed in venues or at events identified as "LGBTQ-friendly."

There is one artist whose stance on LGBTQ issues is unclear. J. Cole, in row 451, was criticized for using homophobic language in his songs. This would indicate he is anti-LGBTQ. However, his explanation for using these words was to "make everyone uncomfortable for the sake of this very conversation," indicating that he wanted to spark a conversation about homophobia and is actually against it. Since his stance is unclear, I have entered "N/A" for row 451, column E.

Please note that in some cases, sources older than 24 months were used to determine an artist's stance on LGBTQ issues or to identify their birthplace.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 462-481

Rows 462-481, columns B-F of the attached spreadsheet have been completed. For bands that are listed on the spreadsheet, the lead singer/vocalist has been identified as the group's leader if their official websites did not explicitly identify the leader. The gender and race of each leader have been identified by visually examining publicly available images of the leader. A general press search was conducted to find evidence if any of the males are not cisgender male. It was assumed that every male is a cisgender male if there are no articles that explicitly stated otherwise.
None of the leaders have taken part in anti-LGBTQ activities. For most of the leaders, there was no evidence that could verify if they are pro- or anti-LGBTQ (N/A). The leaders are considered LGBTQ activists if they have been linked to pro-LGBTQ activities such as working regularly with LGBTQ charities, posting pro-LGBTQ messages on social media, and receiving an award for being an icon in the LGBTQ community. Please note that sources older than two years have been used to provide evidence to verify if the leaders are pro- or anti-LGBTQ.

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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 482-501

The prevailing demographic is that of cisgender Caucasian males. Whilst none of the artists could be identified to be anti-LGBTQ, only 6 artists can be seen to be active supporters of the LGBTQ community. Please refer to the attached spreadsheet for a full depiction of these findings.

FINDINGS

For the large part, the requested information could be found through a compilation of press releases, social media profiles, and band websites. Frequently, an artists' stance on LGBTQ could be identified through a bands' attendance to relevant events. Please note that many of these resources were found to refer to the LGBTQ community using the popular variant LGBT.
The only limitation to this research arose in the determination of each artists' race. As this information is usually not explicitly stated, assumptions have been made as to ethnicity using a combination of birth areas and public images. As such, unfortunately, accuracy in this area cannot be fully assured.

CONCLUSION

To summarize, the artists and bands listed in rows 482 to 501 of the spreadsheet have been examined through a variety of media. Many of these artists could be identified to be active LGBTQ supporters, including multiple that are actively taking action to improve LGBTQ rights.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 502-521

I have filled out rows 502-521 of the attached spreadsheet with the requested information. I sourced most of the information from individual websites, celebrity news websites and news articles published by major media outlets. I also checked social media accounts to ascertain whether these artists actively support LGBT topics or hashtags.

FINDINGS

Row 517 had only one name, i.e., joseph, which made it impossible to triangulate the whole name and then fill out the cell. In this regard, this row has been left blank since a single yet common name is insufficient to point us in the right direction. In spite of this, I found a few examples that show strong gay and lesbian elements in either what the artists say, post on social media or during conversations or interviews.

For example, in 2015 and on twitter, a John Digweed fan tweeted, “Alguien quiere ir conmigo a la estación a ver a John Digweed , por que mis amigos son unos gays” i.e., Someone wants to go with me to the station to see John Digweed, because my friends are gay (Google translation.) Besides, his twitter account also identifies with additional gayish innuendos, and he performs at events often frequented by gay people. Moreover, a conversation published on Noisey notes that prior to his music career, John Doe was involved in poetry performance, and their writings at that time included some gay and lesbian element. In addition, John Maus is a well-known philosopher and an activist of the LGBT agenda, and has a song called “rights for gay.

Others such as Johnny Balik feature instances of gay elements on their twitter accounts. In December 2017, he tweeted “Make the Yuletide gay,” which is a movie about college gay students. Some artists suffer mistaken identity for being gay while no concrete evidence exists to justify those claims. One such victim is Jon John Pardi, who fans are having a hard time understanding his gender orientation. Joseph Capriati is a renowned Dj and reveler famed for deejaying at gay events and parties. While I found no concrete evidence tying Joshua Hedley to pro-LGBT views, I came across one of his Twitter post where he jokes about gay people saying, “Gay people be like lol I'm married.”

In conclusion, you can find the requested information on each band and/or artist on the attached spreadsheet rows 502-521.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 522-541

I have filled out rows 522-541 of the attached spreadsheet with the requested information. Most of the information was contained in their respective websites and celebrity news sites as well. I also used external sources to supplement the information found on individual or group websites. In determining whether these musicians are LGBT activists, or their views regarding LGBTQ issues, I searched across different websites, especially celebrity news sites, and articles posted on reputable media websites.

FINDINGS

It appears that most modern artists have a soft spot for the LGBT community, and openly appreciate the gay people. Female artists appear more vocal than their male counterparts and do not shy away from expressing their pro-LGBT views.

Of all the twenty artists identified in rows 522-541, women celebrities seem more vocal in airing their views regarding the LGBT community. For instance, Julien Baker considers herself a “liberal, gay, young Christian still with deep ties to her native South.” Kacey Musgraves, one of the most outspoken LGBTQ-friendly artist, hopes and dreams of a day when country music shall have an iconic, loud and proud gay artist, ideally, a hero for country music fans.

While Julien and Kacey support LGBT activism, Kailee Morgue, on the other hand shares divergent opinions. On her twitter account, she describes her LGBT themed song about getting lost in the woods and notes, “Medusa makes me this leader of the broken but I’m down with the lesbian shit.” Contrary to both the positive and negative LGBT comments above, Kai Uchis openly talks about the LGBT community but does not reveal whether she supports or opposes them. She acknowledges the fact that she grew knowing and interacting with gay people, and that her parents were open and allowed her to be whatever she wanted.

Male artists, also have differing opinions regarding the LGBT community. For instance, Peter Dreimanis who leads the July Talk band associates himself with the GayCagary magazine and makes pro-LGBT comments that support their views. Moreover, a Daft Punk fan describes the Justice electronic music group as “hella gay,” however, Xavier, Gaspard’s partner in that group acknowledges that besides doing music they hangout a lot together, but that has never seemed gay to them. Interestingly, in a new bonkers South Park game, Kanye West disguises himself as a gay fish attempting to smuggle his mother into heaven.

Unfortunately, some artists have suffered from fears of what people think about them being gay. In particular, Kaytranada has suffered silently over the years not knowing how to break the ice regarding his gender orientation until he told Fader magazine that he is gay, but was scared of how his people will perceive the news and quotes, “we are Haitians and Haitians don’t appreciate gay people at all.” While not all band musicians and solo artists share deep thoughts regarding gayism, some take it to another level often cracking jokes, which is also a form of promoting gayism. For instance, Kaskade, on twitter jokes about gayism and says, “No mum, I’m not gay I just really like wearing your makeup” of all the men artists in rows 522-541, only Justin Jay acknowledges openly that he is not gay and does not go out every night.

In conclusion, you can find the requested information on each band and / or artist on the attached spreadsheet rows 522-541.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 542-561

The rows of 542-561 have been updated on the attached spreadsheet. The information was found using news articles, band websites, popular industry publications, band announcements, social media accounts, biographies, and press releases. We located the information on band leaders, cisgender status, race, and any LGBTQ support as well as the accompanying sources.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 562-581

Of the 20 musicians researched for this request — 18 of whom are Caucasian — 17 are cisgender males and 3 are cisgender females.

An extensive search of the public domain revealed 3 of the artists are supportive of the LGBTQ community as evidenced by public statements.

FINDINGS

Kristian Bush posted a simple Tweet in support of the same sex marriage ruling by the US Supreme Court in 2015.

Lady Gaga — Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta — is well-known for her support of the LGBTQ community and is not shy about discussing this, and her own sexuality, in television interviews. We also note that Lady Gaga is popular within the LGBTQ community as is Lana Del Ray — Elizabeth Grant — who has also featured lesbian story lines in her music though we have not found any public statements openly indicating her support of the community.

Randy Blythe, lead singer of the band Lamb of God, is a proud supporter of Danica Roem as a both a person and a politician, who is the first openly trans person elected to any state legislature in the United States.

CONCLUSION

Whilst our search only identified 3 artists who have made public statements in support of the LGBTQ community, we found no artist who publicly expressed anti-LGBTQ sentiments. The information on the 20 artists in rows 562 to 581 can be found in the attached spreadsheet.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 582-601

The rows of 582-601 have been updated on the attached spreadsheet. The information was found using news articles, band websites, popular industry publications, band announcements, social media accounts, biographies, and press releases. We located the information on band leaders, cisgender status, race, and any LGBTQ support as well as the accompanying sources. While the majority of the sources are from the past two years, there are a couple of older sources that needed to be used to identify band members or activists status such as Las Ligas Menores which yielded few results due to the need to be translated.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 602-621

Of the specified artists and bands, female artists are the prevailing demographic. In total, none were found to be anti-LGBTQ, and half of the 20 total artists can be seen to be active supporters of the LGBTQ community. Please refer to the spreadsheet for a full overview of these findings.

FINDINGS

The majority of the requested information could be found through a compilation of press releases, social media profiles, and band websites. Oftentimes, LGBTQ support could be identified through a bands' attendance to relevant events. Please note that many of these resources were found to refer to the LGBTQ community using the popular variant LGBT.
The only limitation to this research arose in the determination of each artists' race. As this information is usually not explicitly stated, assumptions have been made as to race using a combination of birth areas and public images. As such, accuracy in this area cannot be superlative.

CONCLUSION

To summarize, the artists and bands listed in rows 602 to 621 of the provided spreadsheet have been examined through a variety of different resources. Many of these artists could be identified to be active LGBTQ supporters, including both cisgender males and female artists.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 622-641

We've completed rows 622-641 of the attached spreadsheet with information on bands including Los Lobos, Loudpvck, Lush, and several others. Read on for some additional notes!

FINDINGS

In cases where the bandleader wasn't identified explicitly, we've included the name of the lead singer as bandleader. We determined each bandleader's gender and race by reading interviews and biographies, and by assuming based on photographs of each individual where gender and race weren't clear from interviews. Finally, we conducted a news and social media search for each bandleader to determine their gender identity and LGBTQ activism history; unless a male bandleader was explicitly identified in these sources as transgender, we marked him as a cisgender male. Please note that while Wonder generally prefers to use sources that are less than two years old, in some cases, artist bios or information confirming their LGBTQ activist status are older than that; we've used these sources where necessary.

None of the bandleaders in these rows had any apparent history of anti-LGBTQ activity that we could find; several had no evidence of an opinion either way. A few of the artists in this section have performed at Pride or other LGBTQ events, and Luke Bryan's song "Most People Are Good" has LGBTQ-affirming lyrics. Still others, including LP and Lucy Dacus, are LGBTQ artists themselves.

CONCLUSION

The name, race, gender identity, and LGBTQ activism status for the bandleaders in rows 622-641 has been added to the attached spreadsheet.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 642-661

Of the 20 musicians researched for this request—16 of whom are Caucasian—16 are cisgender males and 4 are cisgender females.

An extensive search of the public domain revealed that 5 are, or could be perceived as, LGBTQ activists or supporters by their statements or activities. For example:

—Writing music that supports equality for all.
—Making activism their life focus.
—Speaking publicly in support of the LGBTQ community.
—An artist whose music has "helped [others] come out as gay".

FINDINGS

Macklemore collaborated with Ryan Lewis on a song about "love, respect and equality for all"—Same Love—which has been used in same sex marriage campaigns around the globe since it was published in 2012.

Malcolm London is a complex man who has been in the public eye as often for his activism as his art. The LGBTQ community is not the only issue he is passionate about and his activism is boots on the ground; rather than just words. Though an older article, it is included to demonstrate his commitment to his political principles even when he was accused of sexual assault by committing to a "process of accountability and restorative justice."

Mark Ronson, together with 140 other artists, actors and musicians, published their opposition to the Texas legislature's attempts to introduce anti-LGBTQ bills including those impacting the trans community.

Also in response to Texas' proposed anti-LGBTQ bills, Maren Morris Tweeted a message to let others know that she did not share the same beliefs.

Maggie Rogers' popularity with the gay community has come about, in part, to the messages she delivers in her music. For example, her song Alaska gave strength to some fans in their journey to come out as gay.

CONCLUSION

Whilst our search only identified these 5 artists active in supporting LGBTQ rights, we found no artist who publicly expressed anti-LGBTQ sentiments. The information on the 20 artists in rows 642 to 661 can be found in the attached spreadsheet.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 662-681

The requested information for each bandleader has been entered into rows 662-681 of the attached spreadsheet. Most of the band leaders have not openly expressed their LGBTQ views.
We found the information needed on band websites and social media accounts. To determine LGBTQ activism, we looked at events where the artists either participated or performed. We also looked at articles depicting their LGBTQ views. Assumptions have been made about race based on birthplaces and pictures. While some of these bandleaders use only stage names, their birth names have also been entered.
In conclusion, the requested information regarding the artists can be found in rows 662-681 of the attached spreadsheet. 

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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 682-701

The names of the leaders and other information of the following music festival acts are listed in the linked spreadsheet: Methyl Ethel, MGMT, MHD, Miami Horror, Michael Blume, Michael Kiwanuka, Michael Mayer, Michigan Rattlers, Middle Kids, Midnight Larks, Midland, Migos, Miguel, Miike Snow, Mija, Mikky Ekko, Mild High Club, Milky Chance, Mint Field, and Missio. Some of these acts are not really groups or bands but solo artists such as MHD, Michael Blume, Michael Kiwanuka, Michael Mayer, Miguel, Mija, and Mikky Ekko.

METHODOLOGY

In order to find the names of the band leaders and other information pertaining to the music festival acts listed in the linked spreadsheet, I checked popular music sites, the artists' pages, the bands' websites, and other relevant articles. In some cases, I used older sources that are still relevant to check some static information such as LGBTQ views.
All the sources and the available data found for the music festival acts that are included in this particular research task were all inputted in the linked spreadsheet under columns A to F, rows 682 to 701.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 702-721

Most of the band leaders from the list provided do not have publicly known LGBTQ-related views, although exceptions have been noted in the spreadsheet. All the requested information for rows 702-721 of the provided spreadsheet has been generated, with the sources below (also compiled in column F).

Each group's website provided the majority of the requested information, particularly the band leader's name, gender identification, and race. Band leaders, if not identified by their title or by their website, defaulted to the lead singer or. The reason for the distinction in the cases of exemption is the band's egalitarianism, which renders them all equals with no apparent leader. In those cases, the role defaults to the most prominent figure in the band, determined by social media presence.

The band's website was also used to determine whether or not the given leader is an LGBTQ activist. From there, social media outlets like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram were most helpful in determining the leader's status as an activist, particularly in the event that there was no apparent indication from their website. It should be noted that "activist" was taken liberally in the research process. Leaders with any evidence of pro-LGBTQ attitudes paired with action were considered activists.

For example, Mitski (line 703) tweeted out the following on November 9, 2016 while touring in the wake of the Trump campaign in Florida and North Carolina: "poc/lgbtq ppl in red states: I'm touring near some of u, so if u need a place to b, DM/@ me+I'll put as many on my guestlist as venue allows." This tweet was followed by another announcement: "poc/lgbtq ppl in red states coming to my show: if u need a safety buddy to travel w,@ me+I'll RT so mayb my followers in ur area see+link up."

Additionally, in the case of Moderat (line 706) is comprised of two bands, Modeselektor and Apparat. Modeselektor's Twitter handle currently has the LGBTQ community flag at the end of its name, though there is little evidence to suggest active activism from the group, so N/A has been selected for their line in the spreadsheet.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 742-761

The requested information for each requested musician has been entered into rows 742-761 of this spreadsheet. We searched through official websites and biography pages to locate most of the -information regarding race and gender identity. We searched through press articles as well as official social media pages for the artists to determine if they are activists for the LGBTQ community. Some sources are older than 2016 because they contain biographical information that does not change over time.

FINDINGS

We did not find any artists that were openly against that community. The artists that we determined are activists, or otherwise support the LGBTQ community, have either openly spoken about their support, participated in LGBTQ geared performances, or shared and posted pro-LGBTQ material on social media. For those that are marked with N/A, after searching articles, biographies, and social media pages we were still unable to find any evidence that the artist is either an LGBTQ activist, or openly against that community.

In row 747, for the act called "Nothing", we were unable to determine which act or group is being referred to, nor were we able to make an educated guess.
In conclusion, you can find the requested information about each artist in rows 742-761 of this spreadsheet.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 762-781

The names of the leaders and other information of the following music festival acts are listed in the linked spreadsheet: Ookay, Opiuo, Otoboke Beaver, Pachanga Boys, Pale Waves, Papadosio, Paramore, Parov Stelar, Parquet Courts, Party Favor, Patrick Topping, Paul Cauthen, Peaches, Pearl Jam, Peggy Gou, Perfume Genius, Pete York, Pete Yorn, Peter Bjorn and John, and Petit Biscuit. Some of these acts are not really groups or bands but solo performers such as Ookay, Opiuo, Parov Stelar, Party Favor, Patrick Topping, Paul Cauthen, Peaches, Peggy Gou, Perfume Genius, Pete York, Pete Yorn, and Petit Biscuit.

METHODOLOGY

In order to find the names of the band leaders and other data pertaining to the music festival acts listed in the linked spreadsheet, we looked through popular music sites, the artists' pages, the bands' websites, and other relevant articles. In some cases, we used older sources that are still relevant to check some static information such as LGBTQ views and other data.
All the sources and the available data found for the music festival acts that are consolidated in this particular research task were all inputted in the linked spreadsheet under columns A to F, rows 762 to 781.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 782-801

We have completed rows 782-801 of your spreadsheet, which covers the following bands:
Phantogram
Phases
Phoenix
Piff the Magic Dragon
Pigeons Playing Ping Pong
Playboi Carti
PNL
Pokey LaFarge
Poliça
Pond
Poolside
Porches
Porter Robinson and Madeon
Portugal. The Man
Post Animal
Post Malone
PRAYERS
Preoccupations
Preservation Hall Jazz Band
Pretty Lights
In total, 17 leaders of these bands were found to be cisgender males, 15 were found to be Caucasian, and one was found to be LBGTQ activists/supporters, while none were found to be anti-LBGTQ.

METHODOLOGY

In order to locate these findings, we analyzed each of the bands within their respective section of the spreadsheet. For each band, we first analyzed their band members to identify the leader. For this, we defaulted to the lead singer/lead musician of the band, unless a more prominent leader could be identified, such as a founder of the band.
To determine if the band leaders were cisgender males, we searched through trusted media articles on the music industry and LGBTQ community to determine if there was any existing evidence showing that the band leader was not a cisgender male. For example, a band leader who stated in an interview that they were transgender.
To determine race, we conducted visual analysis of the band leaders to determine if they could be considered Caucasian.
To determine if the band leaders were LGBTQ activists, we looked for any instances where they were expressing positive sentiments towards the LGBTQ community, and also conducted research to explore whether the band leaders were members of the community themselves. We also looked for any instances were the band leaders were expressing anti-LGBTQ sentiments. In doing so, we analyzed trusted media articles, interviews, and social media sites.

CONCLUSION

In closing, we have completed rows 782-801 of the attached spreadsheet.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 802-821

The requested information was provided on the leaders of each of the music acts in rows 802-821 of the attached spreadsheet. These musical acts included artists like Priests, PVRIS, and Princess Nokia. Information on their status as an LGBTQ activist, their race, and if they're a cisgender male was compiled in the spreadsheet. A methodology is provided below along with an overview of our findings.

METHODOLOGY + FINDINGS

The requested details were sourced from trusted media sites, event promotions, press releases, social media accounts, and the official websites for each music artist. Information on the race of each artist was readily accessible. Details on whether an artist was a cisgender male or not was also available for each musical act.

In one case, in row 807 of the spreadsheet, the artist was listed as "Pushat." After searching extensively, it was assumed that this was a typo and the intended musical act was "Pusha T." The information included in the spreadsheet was sourced with this in mind.

For some artists, it was unclear whether they are an LGBTQ activist or supporter. When this was the case, it was usually due to the fact that the artist in question had never made a public statement either in support or against the gay community. In some instances, even without a direct statement, the sources indicated the artist's likely support. An example of this would be Tim Armstrong, the leader of Rancid. Although Armstrong has not made a public statement in favor of LGBTQ rights, he has performed with members of the community. In July 2017, he performed with Billie Joe Armstrong, lead singer of Green Day, who is also a bisexual.

Another example can be found with Thom Yorke, the leader of Radiohead. While there is no record of him declaring his support for the LGBTQ community, there is a record of him speaking out against Theresa May. In June 2017, May tried to form a government with the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP). The DUP has a history of "opposing same-sex marriage and abortion." Yorke responded to this move by tweeting "not my government — have you no shame?" While this does not clearly indicate his thoughts on gay rights, by taking a stand against an anti-LGBTQ group, Yorke is likely a supporter. This, however, is not confirmed. Without precise details for either example, each act was marked as "N/A" in the spreadsheet.

The only artist who was noted as not being an LGBTQ supporter was Swae Lee of Rae Sremmurd. While no details were available within the typical two-year time frame of a standard Wonder request, a 2015 article revealed that Swae Lee had used derogatory words toward, Sidney Starr, a transgender woman. After a photograph of Swae Lee with Starr emerged, Swae Lee distanced himself by calling Starr "a man."

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, the requested details on the leaders of several music acts were provided in rows 802-821 of the attached spreadsheet. These details include whether each leader is cisgender male, if they're Caucasian and if they're an LGBTQ activist or supporter.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 822-841

Rows 822-841, columns B-F of the attached spreadsheet have been completed. For bands that are listed on the spreadsheet, the lead singer/vocalist has been identified as the group's leader as their official websites did not explicitly identify the leader. The gender and race of each leader have been identified by visually examining publicly available images of the leader. A general press search was conducted to find evidence if any of the males are not cisgender male. It was assumed that every male is a cisgender male if there are no articles that explicitly stated otherwise.
None of the leaders have taken part in anti-LGBTQ activities. For most of the leaders, there was no evidence that could verify if they are pro- or anti-LGBTQ (N/A). The leaders are considered LGBTQ activists if they have been linked to pro-LGBTQ activities such as posting pro-LGBTQ messages on social media, co-creating a comic book that contained gay characters, and performing at LGBTQ events. Please note that sources older than two years have been used to provide evidence to verify if the leaders are pro- or anti-LGBTQ.

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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 842-861

The requested information for each listed musician has been entered into rows 842-861 of this spreadsheet. We searched through official websites and biography pages to locate most of the information regarding race and gender identity. We searched through press articles as well as official social media pages for the artists to determine if they are activists for the LGBTQ community. Some sources are older than 2016 because they contain biographical information.

FINDINGS

We did not find any artists that were openly against the LGBTQ community. The artists that we determined are activists, or otherwise support the LGBTQ community, have either openly spoken about their support, participated in LGBTQ geared performances, or shared and posted pro-LGBTQ material on social media. For those that are marked with N/A, after searching articles, biographies, and social media pages we were still unable to find any evidence that the artist is either an LGBTQ activist or openly against that community.

Conclusion

Please find the requested information about each artist in rows 842-861 of this spreadsheet.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 862-881

The requested information for each group leader has been entered into rows 862-881 of the attached spreadsheet. The vast majority are Caucasian cisgender males and have not openly expressed any support for LGBTQ rights.

METHODOLOGY

We found the information needed on group websites, media interviews, music industry sites and social media accounts. To determine LGBTQ activism, we looked at events the artists performed in, interviews and posts on social media. Assumptions have been made about race based on birthplaces and photographs of the artists.

FINDINGS

The vast majority of the selected artists and group leaders are Caucasian cisgender males. Most could not be determined to as LGBTQ activists based on online sources. None were found to be anti-LGBTQ, and 6 artists have displayed support for LGBTQ rights including the bisexual front woman of Savages Camille Berthomier AKA Jehnny Beth. Please refer to rows 862-881 of the attached spreadsheet for full details and sources.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 882-901

We updated rows 882-901 of the attached spreadsheet with the requested information about 20 band leaders. Karl Neudert (Señor Kino), Shamir Bailey (Shamir), and Shawn Mendes are the only ones that are not caucasian. Additionally, we could not determine the race of Shey Baba, which we will explain below. Eleven frontmen are cisgender male and nine can be considered LGBTQ activists.

METHODOLOGY
COLUMN B
We identified the leaders by using news articles and "About" sections on official websites. Please note that both Shovels & Rope and Silk City do not have one leader. The former is a folk duo with two lead vocalists, while the latter is a producer duo. For Shovels & Rope, we provided both names and entered "N/A" in column C, as Cary Ann Hearst is a female and Michael Trent is a male. For Silk City, we entered "N/A" in column E, as only Diplo can be considered an LGBT activist.

When applicable, we provided both birth names and the ones under which the artists perform.

COLUMN C
We referenced articles in the music media and "About" sections on the websites. We entered "yes" for those band leaders for whom the press uses male pronouns, with the exception of Shamir, who does not identify as a male.

COLUMN D
Unless there was a direct statement available in interviews or articles in the music media, we searched for the place of birth on official websites or in the media and analyzed the photos to determine the race. In the case of Shey Baba, we were unable to find enough information. He does not receive a lot of media coverage. While it seems that he is not caucasian, we could not find enough evidence of that. Therefore, we decided to enter "N/A" in the appropriate cell.

COLUMN E
We entered "yes" for those musicians who gave direct statements of support for the LGBTQ community on social media or in music and LGBT media, performed at large LGBT events, and/or took part in any other LGBTQ initiatives. For the others, we searched for any indications that they do not support LGBTQ.

We tried to gather the requested information from the most recent articles available. However, when it was not available in sources from the last two years, we used older ones, as it is not time-sensitive.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 902-921

The names of the leaders and other information of the following music festival acts are listed in the linked spreadsheet: Sir the Baptist, Skepta, Skip Marley, Slander, Slaves (U.K.), Sleigh Bells, Slightly Stoopid, Slow Hollows, Slow Magic, Smokepurp, Snail Mail, Snails, Snakehips, SNBRN, SOB X RBE, Sofi Tucker, SOHN, Solange, Solomun, and Son Volt. Some of these acts are not really groups or bands but individuals such as Sir the Baptist, Skip Marley, Slow Magic, SNBRN, Solange, and Solomun.
In order to find the names of the band leaders and other information pertaining to the music festival acts listed in the linked spreadsheet, I checked popular music sites, the artists' pages, the bands' websites, and other relevant articles.
All the sources and the available data found for the music festival acts that are included in this particular research task were all inputted in the linked spreadsheet under columns A to F, rows 901 to 921.

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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 922-941

Only six band leaders in rows 922-941 of the attached spreadsheet have known LGBTQ-related views, with all six supporting LGBTQ rights.

METHODOLOGY

The majority of the information was found on each band's website, although to determine whether band leaders were cisgender males, we often used interviews that illustrated the use of male pronouns in reference to the leaders. Race was determined by cross-referencing each band leader's place of birth with their photos. If a band leader was not identified by title, the lead singer was selected as the default leader. If there was no lead singer, and a group considered all members equal, we used the person most prominently featured in interviews or on social media as the leader.

To determine whether a band leader is an LGBTQ activist, we searched social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for any evidence of support or lack thereof. In several cases, media mentions of a leader's pro- or anti-LGBTQ stance were used to determine a leader's activism. It should also be noted that we took a liberal view of "activist" in the research process. For example, leaders who tweeted pro-LGBTQ sentiments were marked as activists, as were those who performed in venues or at events identified as "LGBTQ-friendly."

Please note that in some cases, sources older than 24 months were used to determine an artist's stance on LGBTQ issues or to identify their birthplace.

CONCLUSION

All the requested information for rows 922-941 of the attached spreadsheet has been generated, with the sources below (also compiled in column F).
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 942-961

Fourteen of the band leaders from the list provided do not have publicly known LGBTQ-related views, although exceptions have been noted in the spreadsheet. All the requested information for rows 941-961 of the provided spreadsheet has been generated, with the sources below (also compiled in column F).

METHODOLOGY & FINDINGS

Each group's website provided the majority of the requested information, particularly the band leader's name, gender identification, and race. Band leaders, if not identified by their title or by their website, defaulted to the lead singer. The reason for the distinction in the cases of exemption is the band's egalitarianism, which renders them all equals with no apparent leader. In those cases, the role defaults to the most prominent figure in the band, determined by social media presence.
The band's website was also used to determine whether the given leader is an LGBTQ activist. From there, social media outlets like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram were most helpful in determining the leader's status as an activist, particularly in the event that there was no apparent indication from their website. It should be noted that "activist" was taken liberally in the research process. Leaders with any evidence of pro-LGBTQ attitudes paired with action were considered activists.
I should be noted that Stormzy (line 943) "[shocked] supporters who have seen the star repeatedly speak out in favour of LGBT rights" when several tweets from 2011-2014 resurfaced, containing homophobic slurs and derogatory language. For that reason, "No" has been selected for cell 943D.
Additionally, Strangers You Know's website (line 944) was unavailable while researching. Their social media pages link to their website, but the website itself is inaccessible. Because of that, little information was available on the duo making it impossible to identify the exact lead. According to their Facebook page, the band is composed of "// Adam // Grady // Strangers," from Los Angeles and Santa Barbara. However, biographical information on their race, gender identification, or LGBT-related activism was unavailable because the descriptions on their social media websites are succinct and only mention their names and hometowns.

CONCLUSION

All details are available in the attached spreadsheet.

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48

Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 962-981

As requested, rows 962-981 of the attached spreadsheet have been completed.
For ascertaining whether a person was cisgender male, we first identified them from photos and gendered pronouns used in media articles, then did a search for whether they had publicly identified as transgender or other. None of the artists in question were non-cisgender males, except for several female leads: Tarriona Ball, Tanya Tucker, Tash Sultana, Tegan and Sarah Quin, Valerie Teicher and Alaina Moore.
Race was determined using photographs, plus any relevant information included in media articles.
In order to ascertain whether the band leader in question could be considered an LGBTQ activist, we conducted advanced research to find press or other mentions linking this person to LGBTQ activism. Few in this set were linked to any LGBTQ awareness or activism, except for Eric Randall, Tash Sultana, Tegan and Sarah Quin and Matty Healy.
In summary, please find all relevant information on the attached spreadsheet.
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49

Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 982-1001

The rows of 982-1001 have been updated on the attached spreadsheet. The information was found using news articles, band websites, popular industry publications, band announcements, social media accounts, biographies, and press releases. We located the information on band leaders, cisgender status, race, and any LGBTQ support as well as the accompanying sources.

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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 1002-1021

We updated rows 1002-1102 of the attached spreadsheet with the requested information about 20 band leaders.

The names of the groups' leaders were obtained using either official websites or media articles about each band or person. Some bands were duets or other groupings where there was no 'lead' singer, so sometimes multiple names appear in column B of the spreadsheet.
For ascertaining whether a person was cisgender male, we first identified them from photos and gendered pronouns used in media articles, then did a search for whether they had publicly identified as transgender or other. None of the artists in question were non-cisgender males, except for several female leads: Syd the Kid, Aimee Allen, Amber Bain and Alison Mosshart.
Race was determined using photographs, plus any relevant information included in media articles.
In order to ascertain whether the band leader in question could be considered an LGBTQ activist, we conducted advanced research to find press or other mentions linking this person to LGBTQ activism. Few in this set were linked to any LGBTQ awareness or activism, except for Jonny Pierce, Brian Fallon, the members of The Glitch Mob, Syd the Kid, Aimee Allen and Amber Bain. The Doobie Bothers' lead singer, Michael McDonald, was determined to be anti-LGBTQ after extremely insensitive and crass jokes made in 2014, saying he would come out as a "tranny" on his next album.
In summary, please find all relevant information on the attached spreadsheet.
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Part
51

Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 1022-1041

We have completed rows 1022-1041 of your spreadsheet, which covers the following bands:
The Last Shadow Puppets
The Lemon Twigs
The Lique
The London Souls
The Long Ryders
The Lumineers
The Malpass Brothers
The Marías
The Marshall Tucker Band
The Martinez Brothers
The Menzingers
The Mountain Goats
The Naked and Famous
The Neighbourhood
The Oh Hellos
The Orwells
The Paranoyds
The Range
The Regrettes
The Revivalists
In total, 16 leaders of these bands were found to be cisgender males, 15 were found to be Caucasian, and three were found to be LGBTQ activists/supporters, while none were found to be anti-LGBTQ.

METHODOLOGY

In order to locate these findings, we analyzed each of the bands within their respective section of the spreadsheet. For each band, we first analyzed their band members to identify the leader. For this, we defaulted to the lead singer/lead musician of the band, unless a more prominent leader could be identified, such as a founder of the band.
To determine if the band leaders were cisgender males, we searched through trusted media articles on the music industry and LGBTQ community to determine if there was any existing evidence showing that the band leader was not a cisgender male. For example, a band leader who stated in an interview that they were transgender.
To determine race, we conducted visual analyses of the band leaders to determine if they could be considered Caucasian.
To determine if the band leaders were LGBTQ activists, we looked for any instances where they were expressing positive sentiments towards the LGBTQ community, and also conducted research to explore whether the band leaders were members of the community themselves. We also looked for any instances where the band leaders were expressing anti-LGBTQ sentiments. In doing so, we analyzed trusted media articles, interviews, and social media sites.

CONCLUSION

In closing, we have completed rows 1022-1041 of the attached spreadsheet.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 1042-1061

Rows 1042-1061 of the attached spreadsheet has been updated with the requested information. Following are the bands and their respective leaders:

FINDINGS/Methodology

1. The Rhyolite Sound-Larry Reha
2. The Sadies-Led by brothers Dallas and Travis Good
3. The Shadowboxers-Adam Hoffman
4. The She's-Hannah Valente
5. The Shelters-Josh Love
6. The Shins-James Mercer
7. The Spencer Lee Band-Spencer Lee
8. The Strokes-Julian Casablancas
9. The Strumbellas-Simon Ward
10. The Temper Trap-Dougy Mandagi
11. The Gentlemen-Beau Patrick Bedford
12. The Turnpike Troubadours-Evan Felker
13. The Vandals-Dave Quackenbush
14. The Walcotts-Tom Cusimano
15. The War & Treaty-Michael Trotter Jr.
16. The War on Drugs-Adam Granduciel
17. The Weeknd-Abel Makkonen Tesfaye
18. The Who-Roger Daltrey
19. The Wild Feathers-Taylor Burns, Ricky Young, Joel King

Since bands rarely specify or label who the leader is, the lead vocalist is usually identified as the leader for the purpose of this research. Apart from Hannah Valente of The She's, all the identified leaders above are cisgender males. Most of them are Caucasians excluding Dougy Mandagi, Michael Trotter Jr. and Abel Tesfaye who are of Indonesian, African-American and Ethiopian descent, respectively.

As for LGBTQ activism, the identified band leader's social media accounts such as Instagram, Twitter and Facebook were checked for any signs of advocacies. We also looked into events, communities and groups they joined. We searched for LGBTQ-related articles that may mention their names and their opinions on LGBTQ rights. After doing an exhaustive research, we were able to determine that the band leaders above are not activists for LGBTQ rights, nor have they expressed strong opinions against the matter.

Conclusion

All details are available within the attached spreadsheet.
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Part
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 1062-1081

For this request, the rows of 1162-1181 have been updated on the attached spreadsheet. Rows 1062-1081 have been completed in a previous request. The information was found using news articles, band websites, popular industry publications, band announcements, social media accounts, biographies, and press releases. We located the information on band leaders, cisgender status, race, and any LGBTQ support as well as the accompanying sources. While the majority of the sources are from the past two years, there are a couple of older sources that needed to be used to identify band members or activists status.
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Part
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 1082-1101

Rows 1082-1101, columns B-F of the attached spreadsheet have been completed. For bands that are listed on the spreadsheet, the lead singer/vocalist has been identified as the group's leader if their official websites did not explicitly identify the leader. The gender and race of each leader have been identified by visually examining publicly available images of the leader. A general press search was conducted to find evidence if any of the males are not cisgender male. It was assumed that every male is a cisgender male if there are no articles that explicitly stated otherwise.
For most of the leaders, there was no evidence that could verify if they are pro- or anti-LGBTQ (N/A). Only Travis Scott could be considered “anti-LGBTQ” as he had made homophobic remarks during one of his performances. The leaders are considered LGBTQ activists if they have been linked to pro-LGBTQ activities such as performing at LGBTQ events or supporting LGBTQ rights. Please note that sources older than two years have been used to provide evidence to verify if the leaders are pro- or anti-LGBTQ.

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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 1102-1121

Of the 20 artists, the prevailing demographic is that of cisgender Caucasian males. In total, none were found to be anti-LGBTQ, and 9 artists can be seen to be active supporters of the LGBTQ community. Please refer to the attached spreadsheet for a full depiction of these findings.

FINDINGS

The majority of the requested information could be found through a combination of press releases, social media profiles, and band websites. LGBTQ support could often be identified through a bands' attendance to relevant events, such as San Diego Pride. Please note that many of these resources were found to refer to the LGBTQ community using the popular variant LGBT.
The only limitation to this research arose in the determination of each artists' race. As this information is usually not explicitly stated, assumptions have been made as to ethnicity using a combination of birth areas and public images. As such, accuracy in this area cannot be superlative.

CONCLUSION

To summarize, the artists and bands listed in rows 1102 to 1121 of the provided spreadsheet have been examined through a variety of media. Many of these artists could be identified to be active LGBTQ supporters, including many cisgender males.
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Part
56

Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 1122-1141

We have completed rows 1122-1141 of your spreadsheet, which covers the following bands:
Victory Boyd
Vince Staples
Vintage Trouble
Virtual Self
Volbeat
Vulfpeck
Waddie Mitchell
Waker
Walden
Walker Hayes
Walker Lukens
Walker McGuire
Warpaint
Waxahatchee
Ween
Weezer
Welles
Westside Gunn
Westside Gunn & Conway
Wet
In total, 16 leaders of these bands were found to be cisgender males, 14 were found to be Caucasian, and four were found to be LBGTQ activists/supporters, while none were found to be anti-LBGTQ.

METHODOLOGY

In order to locate these findings, we analyzed each of the bands within their respective section of the spreadsheet. For each band, we first analyzed their band members to identify the leader. For this, we defaulted to the lead singer/lead musician of the band, unless a more prominent leader could be identified, such as a founder of the band.
To determine if the band leaders were cisgender males, we searched through trusted media articles on the music industry and LGBTQ community to determine if there was any existing evidence showing that the band leader was not a cisgender male. For example, a band leader who stated in an interview that they were transgender.
To determine race, we conducted visual analysis of the band leaders to determine if they could be considered Caucasian.
To determine if the band leaders were LGBTQ activists, we looked for any instances where they were expressing positive sentiments towards the LGBTQ community, and also conducted research to explore whether the band leaders were members of the community themselves. We also looked for any instances were the band leaders were expressing anti-LGBTQ sentiments. In doing so, we analyzed trusted media articles, interviews, and social media sites.

CONCLUSION

In closing, we have completed rows 1122-1141 of the attached spreadsheet.
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Part
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 1142-1161

The prevailing demographic is that of cisgender Caucasian males. Whilst none of the artists could be identified to be anti-LGBTQ, only 5 artists can be seen to be active supporters of the LGBTQ community. Please refer to the provided spreadsheet for a full depiction of these findings.

FINDINGS

For the large part, the requested information could be found through a compilation of press releases, social media profiles, and band websites. Often, an artists' stance on LGBTQ could be identified through a bands' attendance to relevant events. Please note that many of these resources were found to refer to the LGBTQ community using the popular variant LGBT.
The only limitation to this research arose in the determination of each artists' race. As this information is usually not explicitly stated, assumptions have been made as to ethnicity using a combination of birth areas and public images. As such, unfortunately, accuracy in this area cannot be fully assured.

CONCLUSION

To summarize, the artists and bands listed in rows 1142 to 1161 of the spreadsheet have been examined through a variety of media. Many of these artists could be identified to be active LGBTQ supporters, including 2 artists that are actively taking action to improve LGBTQ rights.
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Music Festival Acts - Group Leader Gender/Race/Activism - Rows 1162-1175

Only six band leaders in rows 1162-1175 of the attached spreadsheet have known LGBTQ-related views, with all six supporting LGBTQ rights. All the requested information for rows 1162-1175 of the attached spreadsheet has been generated, with the sources below (also compiled in column F).

The majority of the information was found on each band's website, although to determine whether band leaders were cisgender males, I often used interviews that illustrated the use of male pronouns in reference to the leaders. Race was determined by cross-referencing each band leader's place of birth with their photos. If a band leader was not identified by title, the lead singer was selected as the default leader. If there was no lead singer, and a group considered all members equal, I used the person most prominently featured in interviews or on social media as the leader.

To determine whether a band leader is an LGBTQ activist, I searched social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for any evidence of support or lack thereof. In several cases, media mentions of a leader's pro- or anti-LGBTQ stance were used to determine a leader's activism. It should also be noted that I took a liberal view of "activist" in the research process. For example, leaders who tweeted pro-LGBTQ sentiments were marked as activists, as were those who performed in venues or at events identified as "LGBTQ-friendly."

Please note that in some cases, sources older than 24 months were used to determine an artist's stance on LGBTQ issues or to identify their birthplace.
Sources
Sources

From Part 02
From Part 03
From Part 06
From Part 07
From Part 08
From Part 09
From Part 17