Museum Analysis (2)

Part
01
of three
Part
01

Cultural Attractions- Middle East

Five key cultural destinations for families in the Middle East are the Great Pyramids of Egypt, The Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque, Ephesus, Petra, and the Western Wall of Israel.

1. Great Pyramids of Egypt

  • The great pyramids of Egypt are one of the world's most famous historical sites and one of UNESCO's historical landmarks whose construction began around the fourth century A.D. and finished 4,000 years later in 2325 B.C.
  • This cultural destination is famous as it's one of the few remaining evidences of one of the most powerful and richest ancient civilizations in the history of humanity, and some of the most impressive structures ever made by man.
  • Tourists can ride camels, gaze at the most popular constructions, Menkaure, Khufu, and Khafre, the great Sphinx, check the Great Egyptian Museum with the historical status, and museums, and more.
  • Approximately 14.7 million people visit the great pyramids of Egypt every year.

2. The Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque

  • The Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque is located in Abu Dhabi, and it is one of the first attractions all visitors want to see as it is considered one of the most magnificent buildings in the world.
  • Its famous architectural design, white walls, minarets, domes, and the unique silhouette makes an unbelievable sight and it is a landmark for worship and admiration. It was built as the resting place of Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al-Nahyan and can receive 41,000 visitors at the same time.
  • The building is so popular and beautiful that many hotels were built to see it from a distance.
  • Even with its no-photo rule, and a dress code that includes removing the shoes when entering, the place is a must-see when visiting the Middle East with family.
  • In 2017, the Grand Mosque was visited by 5.8 million visitors from around the world, but the number keeps growing, just in the first half of 2019, 4,480,000 people visited the attraction.

3. Ephesus

  • Ephesus is located in Turkey and has been named one of the Middle East heritage places by UNESCO.
  • Ephesus is a famous archaeological site that dates to 6500 BC. It began as a Greek city, then became a large Roman settlement, and finally a cultural heritage.
  • Some reasons the place is so popular are its relation with Christian history, and the number of features it offers, besides the ancient city, like Virgin Mary's house, the Celsus Library, the prehistoric Cukurici mound, and the original Church of St. John the Evangelist.
  • This cultural attraction receives 2.5 million visitors per year.

4. Jordan

  • One of the top cultural attractions in the Middle East is Petra, located in Jordan, between the Dead and Red Seas and between Syria, Egypt, and Arabia.
  • The place is famous for its archaeological sites, which tell the story of ancient civilizations, the stone-carved structures, the mountains, hidden routes, and secret passages.
  • In 2018, 826,993 people visited Petra, and the number of visitors grew by 53% in 2019.

5. Israel's Western Wall

  • Located in Jerusalem, the Western Wall is a place popular for its history, and as a sacred place for prayer and pilgrimage.
  • The place was built in 19 BCE as the temple of Israel, but the wall is the only remnant of the original construction.
  • It is the holiest place in Jerusalem for Jews and has centuries of tradition of people coming to the wall to leave a written note with their prayers.
  • Families can enjoy the cultural experience, traditions, and explore the hidden passages under the wall.
  • In 2019, 750,000 people visited the wall since the Passover, with an average of 100,000 people per day.

Research Strategy

We defined key cultural destinations as the most popular and most visited by families per year. While a list based on visitors was not available, we combined the information from multiple sources with the most popular cultural attractions for families in the region, and countries of the region.
Part
02
of three
Part
02

Museums- Middle East

Three museums aimed at families and children in the Middle East are The Israel Children's Museum, OliOli, and Bloomfield Science Museum Jerusalem.

The Israel Children's Museum

  • This link is to website for the The Israel Children's Museum.
  • The museum is located in Holon, Israel.
  • This YouTube video showcases the museum.
  • The museum has a 4.6-star rating based on 3,066 Google reviews.
  • The year in which the museum first opened was 2001.
  • The museum describes itself as "an educational-cultural institution providing unique learning experiences."
  • Attractions at the museum include a butterfly life cycle course and an exhibit called "The Kingdom of Time" (which the museum describes as "[a] mythical journey that follows the changes in the world around us as a result of the cycle of life, and deals with growth and change").
  • "Dialogue in the Dark" is an interactive exhibit at the museum, in which visitors experience what it's like to be blind.
  • Two other key attractions at the museum are exhibits named "The Magical Forest" in which kids "discover a mystery box and out of curiosity, unintentionally, they release an elf who plays pranks in the enchanted forest" and "Invitation to Silence" (which is an exhibit focused on "non-verbal communication skills that are hidden within each one of us, as they are expressed in the absence of voice, hearing and spoken language").
  • The only information we found about the number of visitors to the museum is that it has drawn over two million people "[s]ince its opening in 2001." If we assume that such attendance figure (approximately two million) applies to years 2001-2019, that would equate to an average of 111,111 visitors per year (2 million / 18 years (2001-2019)).

OliOli

Bloomfield Science Museum Jerusalem

  • This link is to the Bloomfield Science Museum Jerusalem's website.
  • As its name implies, the museum is located in Jerusalem, Israel.
  • The museum has been described as "an interactive and educational museum that makes science and technology fun for the whole family."
  • The museum features exhibits, shows, and offers special workshops.
  • The year that the museum first opened was 1992.
  • Some of the key attractions at the museum are a 3D movie titled "Turtle Odyssey", an exhibit named "Lunar Landing" which commemorates the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing, and the "Leonardo’s Questions" exhibition in "four areas throughout the museum", which is focused on piquing interest in ongoing learning by exploring topics such as drawing, flight, optics, mechanics, geology, and botany.
  • This YouTube video showcases the museum and what it offers to visitors.
  • The only information we found about museum attendance was a 2016 article stating that "[s]ince opening in 1992, Bloomfield Science Museum Jerusalem has welcomed more than 5 million visitors." From that statement, we can estimate the average, annual number of visitors to the museum by dividing the total number of visitors from 1992-2016 (approximately five million) by 24 (the number of years between 1992 and 2016), which equals approximately 208,333 (the estimated, average number of visitors to the museum per year).
Part
03
of three
Part
03

Middle East Family Demographics

A typical Middle East family with at least one child under the age of 13 is likely to fall in the poor or vulnerable to poverty category and live in urban areas. The parents are likely to be married and to have more than one child. Muslim (Sunni) is the predominant religion, and Arab (with regional differences) is the dominant ethnic group. Children are slightly more likely to be boys than girls. Notably, these families are likely to have a stay-home mother, while the father is part of the workforce, probably in a middle-skilled role as a waged or salaried worker, in the Services or Industry category.

Religion

  • A household with at least one child under the age of 13 is very likely to be a Muslim household (predominantly Sunni). In countries with high immigration rates, Catholics may be a relevant group; however, they are usually repressed.

Socioeconomic Status

  • A household in the Middle East with children is likely to be poor or vulnerable to poverty. According to the most recent and detailed data, 41% of the total population across 10 Arab countries are poor, while another 25% are vulnerable to poverty. This translates to around 250 million people out of 400 million.
  • The proportion of families that cannot afford basic monthly needs, such as food, water and housing, fluctuate between 70% to 85% of all families in the region. In non-oil producing countries, middle-class families are slipping into poverty more often.
  • In the Middle East, 10% of the population controls 64% of the wealth. For reference, in the United States, 10% of the population controls 47% of the wealth.

Household Structure

  • There are severe differences between the average household size among the different countries in the region. Oman has the highest average, with eight people per household, while Egypt has the lowest, with 4.1 (out of the countries with available data).
  • Children under the age of 13 are likely to live with married parents. Again, there are severe differences between countries. For instance, in Morocco, the ratio between married and single parents is 4 to 1, while in Yemen, that ration goes up to 14 to 1.
  • The same point is valid for the age of the parents. The prevalence of marriage under the age of 18 in Yemen is 32%, while in Lebanon, the number decreases to only 2%.

Location

  • A household with children in the Middle East is likely to be located in urban areas in most countries, except for Egypt, Sudan, and Yemen.

Employment

  • As of 2017, high-skilled employment stood at 21% on average, while middle-skilled roles accounted for 66% of all formal sector jobs. The United Arab Emirates (UAE), Egypt, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia lead the way in the local availability of high-skilled jobs.
  • Those living in Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Yemen, Algeria and Jordan are more likely to have working parents than those in Qatar, UEA, and Kuwait.
  • Middle-Eastern Children under the age of 13 are likely to have a working father and a stay-home mother, as female participation in the workforce tends to be much lower.
  • Industry vertical varies according to the country, but Services are more predominant. Parents are likely yo be waged or salaried workers.

Country Data

  • As information was not available for the region, data from the countries that compose the Middle East was used to compile the demographic profile.

Bahrain

  • Total Population: 1,684,714 (0-14 years: 18.88%)
  • Percentage of Households with Children under the age of 14: N/A
  • Dependency Ratio: 28%
  • Average Household Size: 5.9
  • Income Index: 0.911 (2017)
  • Sex ratio (males per 100 females): 162
  • Children: Among all females in Bahrein, 26% are under 15. Among the total male population, 16% is under 15.
  • Marital Status: N/A
  • Adults in the workforce: 87% of males and 45% of females over the age of 15
  • Employment Status: Waged and salaried workers in Service or Industry (42% vs 57%)
  • Total Fertility Rate: 2
  • Early marriage before age 18: 3%
  • Ethnic groups: Bahraini 46%, Asian 45.5%, other Arab 4.7%
  • Religion: Muslim 73.7%, Christian 9.3%, Jewish 0.1%, other 16.9% (2017 est.)
  • Urban population: 89.4% of total population (2019)
  • Notable difference: Immigrants make up approximately 48% of the total population, according to UN data (2017)

Egypt

  • Total Population: 101,794,415 (0-14 years: 33.38%)
  • Percentage of Households with Children under the age of 14: 63.4%.
  • Dependency Ratio: 55%
  • Average Household Size: 4.1
  • Sex ratio (males per 100 females): 107
  • Children: Among all females in Egypt, 34% are under 15. Among the total male population, 34% is under 15.
  • Marital Status: Children under the age of 14 are 9.2 times more likely to be living with a married couple than a single parent.
  • Adults in the workforce: 63% of adult males and 22% of adult females.
  • Status: Males: Waged and salaried workers (70.8%), Employers (12.6%), Self-employed workers (13%) Contributing unpaid family workers (3.6).
  • Industry: Services (46%), Industry (32%), and Agriculture (22%).
  • Total Fertility Rate: 4
  • Early marriage before age 18: 17%
  • Ethnic groups: Egyptian 99.7%
  • Religion: Muslim (predominantly Sunni) 90%
  • Urban population: Urban population: 42.7% of total population (2019)

Iraq

  • Population: 39,968,930 (0-14 years: 39.01%)
  • Percentage of Households with Children under the age of 14: 91%
  • Dependency Ratio: 65%
  • Average Household Size: 7.7
  • Sex ratio (males per 100 females): 102
  • Children: Among all females in Iraq, 37% are under 15. Among the total male population, 39% are under 15.
  • Marital Status: Children under the age of 14 are 10 times more likely to be living with a married couple than a single parent.
  • Adults in the workforce: 72% of adult males and 15% of adult female.
  • Status: Males: Waged and salaried workers (71%), Employers (5.6%), Self-employed workers (20.6%) Contributing unpaid family workers (1.9%).
  • Industry: Services (61%), Industry (28%), and Agriculture (6%).
  • Total Fertility Rate: 4
  • Early marriage before age 18: 28%
  • Ethnic groups: Arab 75-80%, Kurdish 15-20%, other 5% (data is a 1987 government estimate; no more recent reliable numbers are available)
  • Religion: Muslim (official) 95-98% (Shia 64-69%, Sunni 29-34%)
  • Urban population: 70.7% of total population (2019)

Jordan

  • Population: 10,175,084 (0-14 years: 34.14%)
  • Percentage of Households with Children under the age of 14: 61.8%
  • Dependency Ratio: 58%
  • Average Household Size: 4.8
  • Sex ratio (males per 100 females): 113
  • Children: Among all females in Jordan, 35% are under 15. Among the total male population, 36% are under 15.
  • Marital Status: Children under the age of 14 are 8.5 times more likely to be living with a married couple than a single parent.
  • Adults in the workforce: 69% of adult males and 12% of adult female.
  • Status: Males: Waged and salaried workers (82%), Employers (6.1%), Self-employed workers (9.9%) Contributing unpaid family workers (1%)
  • Industry: Services (73%), Industry (23%), and Agriculture (4%)
  • Total Fertility Rate: 3
  • Early marriage before age 18: 8%
  • Ethnic groups: Jordanian 69.3%, Syrian 13.3%, Palestinian 6.7%, Egyptian 6.7%
  • Religion: Muslim 97.2% (official; predominantly Sunni), Christian 2.2%
  • Urban population: 91.2% of total population (2019)

Kuwait

  • Population: 4,252,984 (0-14 years: 24.81%)
  • Percentage of Households with Children under the age of 14: N/A
  • Dependency Ratio: 29%
  • Average Household Size: 5.8
  • Sex ratio (males per 100 females): 131
  • Children: Among all females in Kuwait, 25% are under 15. Among the total male population, 19% are under 15.
  • Marital Status: N/A
  • Adults in the workforce: 88% of adult males and 50% of adult females.
  • Status: Males: Waged and salaried workers (97.9%), Employers (0.7%), Self-employed workers (1.4%) Contributing unpaid family workers (0)
  • Industry: Services (57%), Industry (43%), and Agriculture (0)
  • Total Fertility Rate: 3
  • Early marriage before age 18: N/A
  • Ethnic groups: Kuwaiti 30.4%, other Arab 27.4%, Asian 40.3%
  • Religion: Muslim (official) 74.6%, Christian 18.2%, other and unspecified 7.2% (2013 est.)
  • Urban population: 100% of total population (2019)
  • Notable difference: Immigrants account for more than 69.5% of the total population.

Lebanon

  • Population: 6,833,771 (0-14 years: 23.32%)
  • Percentage of Households with Children under the age of 14: N/A
  • Dependency Ratio: 35%
  • Average Household Size: 4.3
  • Sex ratio (males per 100 females): 101
  • Children: Among all females in Lebanon, 24% are under 15. Among the total male population, 24% are under 15.
  • Marital Status: N/A
  • Adults in the workforce: 71% of adult males and 23% of adult females.
  • Status: Males: Waged and salaried workers (56.8%), Employers (11%), Self-employed workers (28%) Contributing unpaid family workers (3.4)
  • Industry: Services (63%), Industry (26%), and Agriculture (11%)
  • Total Fertility Rate: 2
  • Early marriage before age 18: 6%
  • Ethnic groups: Arab 95%, Armenian 4%, other 1%
  • Religion: Muslim 57.7% (28.7% Sunni, 28.4% Shia, smaller percentages of Alawites and Ismailis), Christian 36.2% (Maronite Catholics are the largest Christian group), and Druze 5.2%.
  • Urban population: 88.8% of total population (2019)

Libya

  • Population: 6,845,309 (0-14 years: 25.53%)
  • Percentage of Households with Children under the age of 14: N/A
  • Dependency Ratio: 43%
  • Average Household Size: 5.6
  • Sex ratio (males per 100 females): 103
  • Children: Among all females in Lybia, 28% are under 15. Among the total male population, 29% are under 15.
  • Marital Status: N/A
  • Adults in the workforce: 79% of adult males and 26% of adult females.
  • Total Fertility Rate: 2
  • Early marriage before age 18: N/A
  • Ethnic groups: Berber and Arab 97%, other 3%
  • Religion: Muslim (official; virtually all Sunni) 96.6%, Christian 2.7%, Buddhist 0.3%
  • Urban population: 80.4% of total population (2019)

Morocco

  • Population: 36,789,143 (0-14 years: 25.47%)
  • Percentage of Households with Children under the age of 14: 68.4%
  • Dependency Ratio: 41%
  • Average Household Size:4.6
  • Sex ratio (males per 100 females): 101
  • Children: Among all females in Morocco, 27% are under 15. Among the total male population, 28% are under 15.
  • Marital Status: Four times more likely to be a couple with children than a single parent.
  • Adults in the workforce: 71% of adult males and 24% of adult females.
  • Status: Males: Waged and salaried workers (50.7%), Employers 2.9%), Self-employed workers (32.7%) Contributing unpaid family workers (10.4%).
  • Industry: Services (0), Industry (30%), and Agriculture (70%).
  • Total Fertility Rate: 2
  • Early marriage before age 18: 16%
  • Ethnic groups: Arab-Berber 99%, other 1%
  • Religion: Muslim 99% (official; virtually all Sunni, <0.1% Shia), other 1%
  • Urban population: 63% of total population (2019)

Oman

  • Population: 5,070,014 (0-14 years: 30.1%)
  • Percentage of Households with Children under the age of 14: N/A
  • Dependency Ratio: 33%
  • Average Household Size:8
  • Sex ratio (males per 100 females): 189
  • Children: Among all females in Oman, 31% are under 15. Among the total male population, 17% are under 15.
  • Marital Status: N/A
  • Adults in the workforce: 89% of adult males and 31% of adult females.
  • Status: Males: Waged and salaried workers (96.3%), Employers (1.3%), Self-employed workers (2.3%) Contributing unpaid family workers (0.2%)
  • Industry: Services (54%), Industry (40%), and Agriculture (5%)
  • Total Fertility Rate: 3
  • Early marriage before age 18: 16%
  • Ethnic groups: Arab, Baluchi, South Asian (Indian, Pakistani, Sri Lankan, Bangladeshi), African
  • Religion: Muslim 85.9%, Christian 6.5%, Hindu 5.5%, Buddhist 0.8%
  • Urban population: 85.4% of total population (2019)

Qatar

  • Population: 2,866,531 (0-14 years: 12.7%)
  • Percentage of Households with Children under the age of 14:
  • Dependency Ratio: 22%
  • Average Household Size: 5.3
  • Sex ratio (males per 100 females): 302
  • Children: Among all females in Qatar, 27% are under 15. Among the total male population, 10% are under 15.
  • Marital Status: N/A
  • Adults in the workforce: 96% of adult males and 59% of adult females.
  • Status: Males: Waged and salaried workers 99.6%), Employers (0.3%), Self-employed workers (0.1%) Contributing unpaid family workers (0) .
  • Industry: Services (36%), Industry (63%), and Agriculture (1%) .
  • Total Fertility Rate: 3
  • Early marriage before age 18: 4%
  • Ethnic groups: non-Qatari 88.4%, Qatari 11.6% (2015 est.)
  • Religion: Muslim 67.7%, Christian 13.8%, Hindu 13.8%, Buddhist 3.1%
  • Urban population: 99.2% of total population (2019)

Saudi Arabia

  • Population: 34,658,388 (0-14 years: 25.74%)
  • Percentage of Households with Children under the age of 14:
  • Dependency Ratio: 35%
  • Average Household Size: 5.6
  • Sex ratio (males per 100 females): 103
  • Children: Among all females in Saudi Arabia, 28% are under 15. Among the total male population, 22% are under 15.
  • Marital Status: N/A
  • Adults in the workforce: 78% of adult males and 20% of adult females.
  • Status: Males: Waged and salaried workers (95.3%), Employers (1.1%), Self-employed workers (3.3%) Contributing unpaid family workers (0).
  • Industry: Services (44%), Industry (55%), and Agriculture (1%).
  • Total Fertility Rate: 2
  • Early marriage before age 18: N/A
  • Ethnic groups: Arab 90%, Afro-Asian 10%
  • Religion: Muslim (official; citizens are 85-90% Sunni and 10-15% Shia),
  • Urban population: 84.1% of total population (2019)
  • Notable difference: immigrants make up 37% of the total population (2017)

Sudan

  • Population: 43,545,267 (0-14 years: 43.07%)
  • Percentage of Households with Children under the age of 14: 76.6%
  • Dependency Ratio: 74%
  • Average Household Size: 5.6
  • Sex ratio (males per 100 females): 104
  • Children: Among all females in Sudan, 41% are under 15. Among the total male population, 42% are under 15.
  • Marital Status: Children under the age of 14 are 3.1 times more likely to be living with a married couple than a single parent.
  • Adults in the workforce: 70% of adult males and 25% of adult females.
  • Status: Males: Waged and salaried workers (54.5%), Employers (7.3%), Self-employed workers (29.2) Contributing unpaid family workers (9.4)
  • Industry: Services (43%), Industry (18%), and Agriculture (38%)
  • Total Fertility Rate: 5
  • Early marriage before age 18: 34%
  • Ethnic groups: Arab (approximately 70%)
  • Religion: Sunni Muslim
  • Urban population: 34.9% of total population (2019)

Syria

  • Population: 17,376,511 (0-14 years: 31.39%)
  • Percentage of Households with Children under the age of 14: N/A
  • Dependency Ratio: 66%
  • Average Household Size: N/A
  • Sex ratio (males per 100 females): 105
  • Children: Among all females in Syria, 38 % are under 15. Among the total male population, 39% are under 15.
  • Marital Status: N/A
  • Adults in the workforce: 70% of adult males and 12% of adult females.
  • Total Fertility Rate: 3
  • Early marriage before age 18: 13%
  • Ethnic groups: Arab ~50%, Alawite ~15%, Kurd ~10%, Levantine ~10%, other ~15%
  • Religion: Muslim 87% (official; includes Sunni 74% and Alawi, Ismaili, and Shia 13%), Christian 10%
  • Urban population: 54.8% of total population (2019)

Tunisia

  • Population: 11,783,527 (0-14 years: 25.25%)
  • Percentage of Households with Children under the age of 14: N/A
  • Dependency Ratio: 35%
  • Average Household Size: 4
  • Sex ratio (males per 100 females): 99
  • Children: Among all females in Tunisia, 23% are under 15. Among the total male population, 25% are under 15.
  • Marital Status: N/A
  • Adults in the workforce: 70% of adult males and 24% of adult females.
  • Status: Males: Waged and salaried workers (70%), Employers (7%), Self-employed workers (20%) Contributing unpaid family workers (2.4%)
  • Industry: Services (44%), Industry (42%), and Agriculture (14%)
  • Total Fertility Rate: 2
  • Early marriage before age 18: 2%
  • Ethnic groups: Arab 98%, European 1%, Jewish and other 1%
  • Religion: Muslim (official; Sunni) 99.1%
  • Urban population: 69.3% of total population (2019)

United Arab Emirates

  • Population: 9,856,379 (0-14 years: 14.39%)
  • Percentage of Households with Children under the age of 14: N/A
  • Dependency Ratio: 21%
  • Average Household Size: N/A
  • Sex ratio (males per 100 females): 99
  • Children: Among all females in the UEA, 24% are under 15. Among the total male population, 10% are under 15.
  • Marital Status: N/A
  • Adults in the workforce: 93% of adult males and 53% of adult females.
  • Status: Males: Waged and salaried workers (96%), Employers (3%), Self-employed workers (0.6%) Contributing unpaid family workers (0.1%)
  • Industry: Services (58%), Industry (41%), and Agriculture (1%)
  • Total Fertility Rate: 2
  • Early marriage before age 18: N/A
  • Ethnic groups: Emirati 11.6%, South Asian 59.4% (includes Indian 38.2%, Bangladeshi 9.5%, Pakistani 9.4%, other 2.3%), Egyptian 10.2%, Filipino 6.1%, other 12.8% (2015 est.)
  • Religion: Muslim (official) 76%, Christian 9%
  • Urban population: 86.8% of total population (2019)

Yemen

  • Population: 29,635,044 (0-14 years: 39.16%)
  • Percentage of Households with Children under the age of 14: 81.6%
  • Dependency Ratio: 83%
  • Average Household Size: 6.7
  • Sex ratio (males per 100 females): 104
  • Children: Among all females in Yemen, 43% are under 15. Among the total male population, 45% are under 15.
  • Marital Status: Children in Yemen are 14 times more likely to live with married parents than single parents.
  • Adults in the workforce: 65% of adult males and 6% of adult females.
  • Status: Males: Waged and salaried workers (70.8%), Employers (12.6%), Self-employed workers (13%) Contributing unpaid family workers (3.6)
  • Industry: Services (57%), Industry (15%), and Agriculture (28%)
  • Total Fertility Rate: 4
  • Early marriage before age 18: 32%
  • Ethnic groups: predominantly Arab; but also Afro-Arab, South Asian, European
  • Religion: Muslim 99.1%
  • Urban population: 37.3% of total population (2019)

Research Strategy

There is limited available information about the household structure of countries in the Middle East. The research team initially attempted to locate data for the entire region, but it was either unreliable, unavailable, or lacked the necessary details.
We scoured through multiple databases, reports from organizations such as The United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia, demographic profiles, however, information about households with children under 13 was not available.
Still hoping to provide a comprehensive report, we constructed demographic profiles for each country and then used them to make data-based assumptions (we refrained from calculating the average to avoid inaccuracies due to the differences in population size). The data used for each country individually was presented in a separated section; therefore, the links were provided in that section instead of the summary.
Sources
Sources

From Part 03