Mobile Search and Advertising Market

Part
01
of five
Part
01

Web-Scale Search Capabilities

While web-scale is the so-called "wave of the future" when it comes to search engines -- and, in fact, they cannot operate without web-scale -- Google remains the standard-bearer.

ASSUMPTIONS AND METHODOLOGY

Because Google is considered the standard-bearer of web-scale capabilities, any other search engine would be compared to Google, and it would inevitably come up short (especially if, like Yandex, they are hyper-local). Google is considered the top search engine because it holds 87% of the global market share. The top four search engines are rounded out by Bing with 5.11% of the global market, Yahoo with 3.94%, and Baidu with 0.87%. These figures were based on the global market share from 2010-2017. Other search engines like AOL, ASK.com. WolframAlpha, DuckDuckGo, and Yandex were included because they round out the majority of the top 10 search engines.

WEB SCALE -- THE TOP FOUR SEARCH ENGINES

GOOGLE

Because Google exists on a global scale, their offerings are infinitely greater than other search engines. Features that they offer include, but are certainly not limited to, the following:

1. Basic searches
2. Rich searches (which include styles, images, and other sundry results that provide the user with a comprehensive overview of their query).
3. Enriched searches (which provide a more interactive result)
4. Knowledge graph (which takes its layout from schema.org and looks like an encyclopedia entry)
5. Carousel (which provides multiple rich search results)

Google, of course, also has a proprietary mobile search app. Users on both mobile and desktop can access search results based on content type and enhancements. Content type shows users results based on whether their search is related to an event, a news article etc. Enhancements show users features like review stars associated with their search.

This search engine allows users to access their search history across devices as long as the user is logged into their Google account.
Google also provides a "crisis response service" that features a missing person tool that people can use to find one another during emergencies.

YAHOO

Yahoo, meanwhile, offers both responsive design results (which, according to LifeWire, is "mobile web-enabled sites") and targeted local results. Yahoo also has a mobile app dedicated to searches and email. Their app has a minimal design and allows users to search hands-free by voice. In the US, users can access a combined map and list view for local searches. The app also suggests keywords and provides a "safe search" mode. People can search by video, travel, and subscription search that gives users access to information that search engines don't typically access.

This search engine offers an "extensive gallery of mobile widgets." These widgets include platforms like eBay, MTV news, Flickr, and other widgets related to news, e-mail, sports, weather, jobs, finance, and more. Yahoo also offers an "online bookmark organizer." It's important to note that, as of 2011, Yahoo's search capabilities are powered by Bing.

BING

Bing, which is owned by Microsoft and commands about 5% of the market share, also has a mobile app dedicated to searches, and according to their Android app description, they also offer a proprietary "Bing Rewards" program which the user can then redeem for gift cards at various retailers, including Amazon and Starbucks.

Bing users can search by barcodes as well as by voice and photos. The barcode scanner allows users to save money through price comparison. Searching by voice can trigger regular web results or can also generate search results for songs. In 2016, Bing released updates to their iOS and Android apps that added: "new music and video features, along with more map options." In terms of music, the app played soundless videos "directly in search results with the lyrics" displayed below and listed trending songs and artists.

Users were able to add films to their watch lists on Amazon Prime or Netflix from the movie section in Bing's app. The update also allowed users to designate which map app they preferred, access a "reading mode" for news pages, and see their search history across their "logged-in devices."

BAIDU

Baidu is China's largest search engine, and as such, is used by millions of people a day. According to Alexa, Baidu is ranked fourth and serves billions of searches a month. It contains many similarities to Google -- and it even offers a dedicated mobile search app. In China, mobile users are more important than desktop users because mobile is "most people’s first and only portal to the online world."

This search engine has their own version of Google's accelerated mobile pages (AMP) called mobile instant page (MIP). This puts an emphasis on the importance of mobile and the weight it has on Baidu's search engine algorithm. In 2016, Baidu announced that it would incorporate artificial intelligence into its biggest apps, including its "mobile search engine, which has hundreds of millions of users. This kind of base-level integration could mean that AR becomes a part of daily life for many." Baidu will rely on a platform called DuSee to use smartphone hardware to get an understanding of real-life 3D environments.

WEB-SCALE: SMALLER SEARCH ENGINES WITH A LESSER OR NON-EXISTENT MARKET SHARE

ASK.com

ASK.com was once known as Ask Jeeves and was one of the first search engines on the mainstream internet. This search engine accounts for 0.05% of the market share and also has a mobile app. ASK.com will return search results if the user types in a "natural" voice, i.e., question/answer format. This platform also provides "traditional keyword searching" and strives to be more user-friendly and intuitive than its competitors. However, it hasn't kept up with the times and has returned search results that have been less than optimal.

This search engine "utilizes technology from teoma.com which clusters websites according to topic communities, using unique technology which" ASK.com calls ExpertRank. ExpertRank allows users to, also access sites related to the term "ozone layer" while searching using the term "global warming."

AOL

One of the first companies to ever offer "commercial" internet services, AOL is a so-called "old time favorite" that now includes web properties like HuffingtonPost.com. It commands about 0.04% of the market, and it's still considered one of the most popular websites in the world. AOL offers a mobile search app that allows users to search for localized information like the weather, trending news, and various interest topics. The app also offers alerts.

As of 2016, AOL is powered by Bing which includes AOL's "web, mobile and tablet search." Bing also provides "paid search ads and algorithmic organic search results to AOL properties worldwide and exclusively in" Australia, Canada, the US, and the UK.

WOLFRAMALPHA

WolframAlpha is not a search engine, proper, but rather a "computational knowledge engine." What this means is that the user will receive their answers in numerical format, thus equating WolframAlpha to a calculator more than a traditional search engine. WolframAlpha offers a mobile search app that provides the "definitive source for instant expert knowledge and computation." Aspects of WolframAlpha are used in Apple's Siri. This platform uses an extensive selection of algorithms to understand questions and generate reports.

The domains covered by this platform include math, physics, data analysis, statistics, materials, engineering, astronomy, chemistry, earth science, life science, computational science, units, measures, dates, times, weather, places, geography, people, history, culture, media, music, transportation and more.

DUCKDUCKGO

DuckDuckGo is a newer search engine that doesn't track its users, which is something that those who are concerned with privacy can take as a positive. Its "clean" interface -- that is, an interface that isn't cluttered with advertisements -- make it appealing to those who simply want quick results. Unlike Google, ads are generated based on search terms rather than a particular user's search history. This search engine only generates one page of search results. DuckDuckGo offers a mobile search app that, according to a company representative, "moves beyond the search box and protects your privacy wherever you go on the Internet." This app is the first on the market to offer tracker blocking, private search, and smarter encryption "across all major platforms." Other features include forced HTTPS and blocking some display ads.

YANDEX

Yandex is a search engine that isn't as well-known in the United States, but it commands about 65% of the Russian market share and is ranked in the top 30 websites in the world, according to Alexa.com. Like Google, it offers proprietary e-mails with a yandex.ru extension. Yandex offers a mobile search app that allows users to search by image, voice, and text. Users benefit from "predictive search" suggestions and the ability of Yandex to decipher songs. Search topics covered by this platform include current traffic, currency exchange rates, breaking news, weather forecast, recipes, TV listings, movies and more. Yandex provides users answers only in "Russian, Ukrainian and Turkish." The app also has a built-in scanner that reads QR codes.

CONCLUSION

Any and all search engines -- whether new or existing -- must look to Google as the standard-bearer, especially when concerning web-scale search capabilities. As the global market trends towards mobile platforms, apps that are dedicated strictly to web-scale search capabilities will become more commonplace, to the point that even search engines that command no significant market share will offer a proprietary app.
Part
02
of five
Part
02

Mobile Search Ad Revenue Sharing


All major mobile search providers identified in the previous study request (Google, Yahoo, Bing, Baidu and Webwombat) have ad revenue sharing programs with their developers, third party qualified content websites, and platform providers (apple iOS, Google Play). Of the information available, revenue sharing varies from 30% to 70% of total ad revenue depending on the deal and critical mass the partner commands.

ADVERTISEMENT REVENUE SHARING

GOOGLE

Google gives a cut of its revenues to outside ad partners in exchange for placement of Google’s ads on their websites and for making Google the default search engine on mobile devices from Apple and Samsung.” For years AdSense was Google’s primary service to deliver ads to websites in exchange for a percentage of ad revenue. However, as mobile usage gained momentum over desktop, Google acquired AdMob for third-party apps and DoubleClick for publishers of its higher-end mobile software.

An example of two of Google's partners are Chinese app maker Cheetah Mobile Inc, which uses AdMob, and Argentine developer Etermax SA which utilizes DoubleClick within its game app
Google is growing by giving app and website creators a bigger chunk of ad sales." “Google gives developers about 70 cents of every $1 it collects from ad buyers, compared to 50 cents to 60 cents at some competitors.” On its website, Google states that publishers who display for content ads with Google “AdSense” receive 68% of the revenue. “For AdSense for search, publishers receive 51% of the revenue recognized by Google.”

Alphabet, Google's parent company, does not release much guidance around it's traffic-acquisition costs. “Alphabet reported traffic-acquisition costs of $5.09 billion — up from $3.98 billion the same time last year — which amounts to 22% of all of Google’s revenues.”

BING

Bing Mobile Ads shares its ad revenue with mobile app platform providers to improve its reach and scale and generate more revenue for itself. Under a program Bing calls “Syndication,” it shares its ad revenue with third party websites where its ads are displayed. Such partners include AOL, adMarketPlace, InfoSpace, Yahoo Inc., Apple, Amazon, Ecosia, The Wall Street Journal, and Gumtree. Unlike Google, Bing's website does not list the exact percentage it shares its partners. Insight into one dynamic of Bing's ad revenue is that it allows businesses to pay for search advertising using Bing's Pay Per Click. “Paid search advertising puts you in control of when, where and how your ads display. Pay only when someone is interested in what your ad promotes — based on factors predetermined by you. Never waste another advertising dollar.”

BAIDU

Baidu shares revenues with developers and qualified publishers. Baidu’s DU Ad Platform is a much talked about mobile ad platform because of its developers and qualified publishers. Baidu shares its mobile advertising revenue with its DU Ad Platform developers to keep them interested in engaged. "Assisting in Baidu’s rise in user and developer numbers are several new features added to the DAP platform this year, including an SDK for Apple’s iOS, and ad formats covering video, weather, caller, swipe, and rewarded video." Utilizing eCPM and ARPU, the share of revenue with developers is estimated at 25%-30% of the total ad revenue. By 2021, Baidu is estimated to capture 18.4% of the digital ad expenditure in China.

The size of Baidu, along with other large Chinese search giants, means they control advertising on their platforms, with most advertisers buying ads directly through one of the companies. In 2017, direct sales accounted for 63.5% of programmatic digital display, while real-time bidding represented 36.5%. This indicates the share of revenue with 'Partners' is minimal for Baidu.

YAHOO

Yahoo apparently employs a similar ad revenue approach as Google, but additional information on the specifics of its strategy was not available.
CONCLUSION

All major mobile search providers have ad revenue sharing programs with their developers, third party qualified content websites, and platform providers. Of the information available, revenue sharing varies from 30% for Baidu to 70% for Google of total ad revenue.

Part
03
of five
Part
03

White Label Search

Of the most popular search engines that offer web scale mobile search, those that have white label search products are Google, Bing, Baidu, DuckDuckGo and Yandex.

GOOGLE

Google has offered white label search since 2006, and has updated its model several times since. The current version of the search capability is customizable and can be embedded in corporate websites and personal blogs. Since Google is the most popular search engine, with 87% of the market share, its engine may also be the most popular to be embedded in websites, although, the company does not provide any information regarding its white label partners. Google's customizable search bar is also deployed on Android devices, such as the Galaxy S8, Essential Phone, and on the Moto X4 as a search widget.

YAHOO! & Bing

Yahoo! used to be the second most used search engine, but fell from that position to Bing in August 2010. Its search engine is currently powered by Bing, and so are all of its search services including white label offerings.

Bing, which is part of Microsoft, offers white label search engine and is deployed in many popular services, such as Amazon's Alexa, Apple's Siri, Gumtree, Uber, and even Yahoo!'s search engine as of 2011. According to 8-Digital, the fact that Bing is deployed in such popular services is the main reason why Bing has now claimed 20% of the UK market.

BAIDU

China's Baidu holds 0.87% of the global market, making it the fourth most popular search engine in the world, but it holds 70% of the market in China compared to Google's nearly 25%. This makes it a giant in its native country. Baidu offers a mobile-capable white label search engine and, as of 2010, was looking to deploy in mobile devices manufactured in China. The company has not disclosed the specific companies, but in 2017 it announced a partnership with Huawei for mobile AI capabilities, which presumably includes search features.

ASK.COM

Ask.com's search engine has had a rough journey. The company, which began as a question-and-answer service and then tried to become a search engine to compete with Google in 2005, shut down its search engine in 2010 and went back to its old model. In its current invention, the engine responds to queries only if asked in a naturalized language (e.g. full questions), and is mobile-friendly.

Ask.com does not appear to offer white label services, though DuckDuckGo's CEO says they are "generally white label" because "they’ve generally focused on the question-and-answer portion of it."
However, Ask.com does not appear to offer white label services to other companies.

AOL

AOL's search engine does not offer white label services.

WOLFRAMALPHA

Wolfram Alpha, which presents itself as a computational knowledge engine instead of a search engine, does not offer white label services.

DUCKDUCKGO

DuckDuckGo, which presents itself as a privacy-centered search engine, does offer a white label search engine. Its website offers an explanation on how to embed the search bar on any site or blog that would like to so. The company also advertises partnerships, but has not made public any of them.

YANDEX

Yandex, which concentrates 65% of the search engine market in Russia, offers white label search engine services and is mobile optimized. As of 2013, the service was looking to deploy its white label services in apps, including VK, Odnoklassniki, ICQ, Twitter, and Foursquare, although, there is no confirmation whether these apps are currently using Yandex's search bar. Device manufacturers such as 3Q, Explay, Oppo, PocketBook, Qumo, teXet, and Wexler also included Yandex's search bar into their new models.

CONCLUSION

Google, Bing, Baidu, DuckDuckGo and Yandex offer white label search engines, which are deployed by online companies, applications, and mobile devices.
Part
04
of five
Part
04

Local Mobile Search: Australia, Latin America, Middle East

Google, Yahoo, and Bing are considered search engine giants in Australia, Latin America, and the Middle East, due to their flexible mobile platform and region-specific search features. Apart from these giants, each region has its own local mobile search companies providing services that are customized specifically for that region. The local mobile search engines for Australia include Webwombat and AusFind. The major local mobile search engine for Latin America is Yahoo’s oneSearch mobile platform. Yamli, Eiktub, and Yoolki are three local search engines designed specifically for the Middle Eastern countries.

Australia

There are six major Australian mobile search engines that are local to the area and are designed to provide Australians with their country-specific resources.
1. Google Australia (Google.com.au): According to WebSearch, Google Australia search engine got nearly 80% of the country’s overall search traffic. Considered as the most popular search engine, google.com.au provides Australians with region-specific search features that include news, maps, white papers, and images.

2. Sensis.com.au: This search engine is another product of Google’s that is specific to Australia. Along with the usual search features specific to the Australian region, Sensis.com.au contains white paper search features and is designed well for smooth mobile access.

3. Yahoo! (au.yahoo.com): This search engine works well as a mobile platform by enabling an easy way to submit new sites and makes it easy to be recognized by the search engine.

4. Bing: Although not as popular as Google, Bing attracts quite a decent amount of Australian traffic. This platform is the smallest and the newest of the Australian search engines and is designed directly into numerous products of Microsoft. This implies that Bing is a default search engine for those who are new to the concept of internet search.

5. Webwombat.com.au: This search engine is purely designed to be a focus of Australia alone. Webwombat does not direct any traffic from the major search engines but was created to provide an additional option to Australians who are looking specifically for Australian resources and the Australian market.

6. AusFind (ausfind.com.au): This search engine is designed to provide Australia-focused listings of various categories to the locals. The directory search categories provided on the main search page include arts, business, computers, games, health, home, kids and teens, news, recreation, reference, regional, science, shopping, society, and sports.

Latin America

According to BizReport, there are an estimated 143 million mobile users in Latin America alone. America Movil is a Latin American mobile provider and provides services to its customers in 16 Latin countries including the Caribbean. Yahoo’s oneSearch mobile platform is one of the major search engines in Latin America that is being provided by America Movil. In the year 2007, the company formed 21 mobile partnerships in order to boost their oneSearch mobile platform.
Google, Yahoo, and Bing are search engine giants with country-specific platforms in Latin America. Each Latin American country contains a region-specific version of Google, Yahoo, and Bing. For example, Argentina’s major mobile search engines are google.com.ar and ar.yahoo.com. Venezuela’s major mobile search engines include google.co.ve and wepa.com/ve. Brazil’s major search engine is br.yahoo.com.

Middle East

Google, Yahoo, and Bing are the major search engines with mobile platforms that people in the Middle East popularly use. These search engines contain a heavy presence in the Arabic market and it has been found that the most purchasing decisions in this region have been made using one of these three search engines.
According to ExtraDigital, the major search engines (google, yahoo, and bing) did not contain the Arabic language feature for those who belonged strictly to “Arabic-speaking cultures”. To bridge this gap, search engines Yamli, Eiktub, and Yoolki were created 6 years ago to cater to the locals of this region. These three search engines have their own mobile platform and provide locals with strictly Arabic-focused search results.
Arabsites.com and findouter.com/MidEast are two other search engines with mobile platforms that cater to all the Middle Eastern countries with region-specific search features.
The following are the list of search engines that are country-specific in the Middle East:
Bahrain: indexuae.com/bahrain
Kuwait: indexuae.com/kuwait
Oman: findouter.com/Oman
Qatar: indexuae.com/qatar
Saudi Arabia: findouter.com/Saudi Arabia
UAE: indexuae.com
Yemen: arabsites.com and findouter.com/Yemen

Each one of the search engines listed above was designed as a web directory for each country’s specific search requirement.

Conclusion

To wrap up, the local mobile search engines for Australia include Webwombat and AusFind. Yamli, Eiktub, Yoolki, arabsites.com, and findouter.com/MidEast are the local search engines designed specifically for the Middle Eastern countries. The major local mobile search engine for Latin America is Yahoo’s oneSearch mobile platform.

Part
05
of five
Part
05

Local Mobile Search: US, UK, Canada

In the U.S., U.K., and Canada, Google is the overwhelming favorite search engine, earning more than 90% of the market in all three countries. Following far behind Google, are Yahoo! and Bing, but they both have about 1% of the market. A deeper look at my research is below.

METHODOLOGY
I began to research which companies provided local mobile search in the US, UK, and Canada. I found that there are only a few that people choose to use and Google dominates the market in all three countries. However, there are still other people using the other 2 search engines.

According to data published by Statista, as of 2017, in the UK, only 0.35% of searches came from Bing, 1.64% from Yahoo, and a whopping 97.81% from Google. Google has had over 90% of the mobile searches in the US since 2016. As of 2018, even Canada mobile searches have shown to be done on Google 91.21% of the time. Below I have provided a list of local mobile search companies in the US, UK and Canada.


#1 Google (US, UK, CANADA)
Google is the top chosen search-engine in all three countries. Over 90% in the US, over 90% in the UK and over 90% in Canada. Google has made the biggest improvements in allowing marketers in the US and the UK to further customize and brand their ads. Businesses are also able to display products and other content on their local pages.

#2 Bing (US, UK, CANADA)
Bing is the third choice in the US and as of 2017 only 1.94% of people chose to use Bing for their searches. In the UK in 2017, 0.35% of people chose Bing. In Canada 5.42% of people chose to use Bing. The latest improvement Bing made was adding holiday hours to search results.

#3 Yahoo (UK, CANADA)
In the US, Yahoo makes up 2.95% of local mobile searches. In the UK, Yahoo controls 1.64% of the market. In Canada, 2.36% of people chose Yahoo. Yahoo simply provides mobile local pages for UK and Canada.

CONCLUSION
To bring this full circle, there are not many search engines that offer mobile local search due to the complexity of the service. However, the most used search engine, Google, has proven to be the leader in amount of users in all three countries since all the data points toward users choosing Google more often. Thank you for using Wonder!
Sources
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