Millennial Parents in China

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Millennial Parents in China

Key tensions, fears, or anxieties facing millennial parents in China are concerns about the safety and quality of products that they buy for their children, fear of not being able to provide the things needed by their children, worry that children may not be keeping up with their peers in education, and fears about pollution, especially the chronic air pollution in the country.

CONCERN ABOUT PRODUCT SAFETY AND QUALITY

  • These parents find it necessary to invest in premium brands for their children. They use forums such as QinBaobao, a famous app, to exchange helpful parenting advice, including where to find better quality and safer products than those available in China, which is a huge concern for the millennial parents.
  • Past scandals related to the quality of products for children make Chinese millennial mothers very careful when buying items for their children. According to a Chinese consulting group, about 60% of Chinese millennial parents surveyed in a research spent over 3,000 yuan or $471 per month on luxury goods for their children.

FEAR THAT THEY WON'T BE ABLE TO PROVIDE EVERYTHING NEEDED FOR THEIR CHILDREN'S COMFORT

  • Millennial parents in China fear that they won't be able to provide everything that their children need to live a good life. For example, some millennial parents feel that their salary is not enough to allow their children to go on summer vacations or attend school trips.
  • These parents register their children for expensive overseas summer programs, and other tutoring classes that cost thousands of yuan. They feel they are forced to do this since other millennial parents are doing the same.
  • An example is given of a Chinese mother who became well known on Wechat in 2017 for commenting that her salary of $4,493 per month was not enough for her child's summer vacation and other expensive overseas summer programs that cost around $5,240.

WORRY THAT THEIR CHILDREN ARE NOT KEEPING UP WITH PEERS IN EDUCATION

  • Millennial parents worry that their children may not have a good education from an early age and that they may not be able to keep up with their peers in their studies. There is a fear that children may lose out.
  • There is an urge among these parents to ensure that their children attend the right kindergarten school, and that they keep up with their peers.
  • This has led to the rise in premium preschools with different programs aimed at providing a wholesome educational approach.
  • Millennial parents in China would like their children to have a better education and outcome than they had, but fear that this may not be possible due to highly competitive Chinese and global markets.

FEARS ABOUT POLLUTION

  • Millennial parents in China fear the consequences of China’s poor air quality on their children's health.
  • These parents try to look for ways to reduce the impact of the pollution, and they also like to try new products that have been marketed as being healthy for children.
  • Such healthy products may include masks to help protect children from air pollution.

RESEARCH STRATEGY:

To find the key tensions, fears, or anxieties facing millennial parents in China, we started by searching for pre-compiled lists with data to fulfill the request. This strategy was not successful, as no list on anxieties facing millennial parents in China was forthcoming. Our second strategy was to search reports, publications, and industry databases, in order to find the required data. This strategy was successful as we found several articles that discussed millennial parents in China, and provided information on their tensions, fears and anxieties. Those fears and anxieties that were repeated more than once were chosen as key and included in our findings.
Sources
Sources

Quotes
  • "In these e-parenting communities, Haitao, meaning cross-border e-commerce, is frequently brought up: How to source safer, better products than the domestic options in China is a primary concern for such parents."
  • "As the clearest indication of the thoughts of this demographic, one simple comment from a mother went viral on WeChat last year: “A Monthly Salary of 30,000 RMB (US$4,493) is Not Enough for My Child’s Summer Vacation”. Written by a highly-paid executive mom, it told the story of how she could hardly keep up with the extravagant overseas summer programmes that she lined up for her daughter. The mother explained that the total cost of her daughter’s education for the summer is 35,000 yuan (roughly US$5,240 USD), including 20,000 yuan (US$3,000) for a 10-day US study tour and other tutoring classes that cost up to 10,000 yuan (US$1,500) – and that she was compelled to do this as all of her peers were doing the same."
Quotes
  • "When they select products, they pay attention to product quality, reputation, and brand, and are willing to pay more for high-quality items."
  • "Quality control scandals in the past have made Chinese mothers very careful when purchasing products for their children. To attract Chinese mothers, brands need to make the extra effort to show that their products are safe and reliable"
Quotes
  • "According to 2015 market research by a Chinese consulting group, about 60 percent of surveyed Chinese millennial parents spent more than 3,000 yuan ($471) per month on luxury goods for their children."