Mezcal Market

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Mezcal Market

The mezcal market is expected to grow at an annual rate of 17.8%-21.71% between 2017 and 2022. It was assessed that this would result in an annual market size of $840 million for 2022. Mezcal is distilled in Mexico mainly in Oaxaca state by many small family distilleries. The popular brands covered below are Del Maguey, Illegal, Fidencio, Scorpion, Sombra, ElJolgorio, and Real Minero. Two upcoming craft brands are also covered, they are Pierde Almas and Mezcal Alipus. Please read on for more information.
MEZCAL MARKET SIZE AND GROWTH
Mezcal is produced in nine Mexican states and consumed all over the world. A market reports states that between the years of 2017 and 2022 the mezcal market will have a CAGR of 17.8%. They projected this to result in $840 million USD total sales by the end of 2022. Another market report claimed a larger growth rate, CAGR 21.71%. After searching for both mezcal and mescal it was found there is a multitude of market reports available for purchase, none of which provided specific numbers for the current size of the market for free, links to two reports have been provided.
Major Brands
The top two mezcal brands in the US are Del Maguey and Illegal. Other major brands include Fidencio, Scorpion, Sombra, El Jolgorio, and Real Minero.
Del Maguey is produced in the Oaxacan villages, the varieties are referred to as Espadin and Tobla. The word Del Maguey means agave in English. The brand is known for its variety of flavors and the culture of sustainability it carries. The company and the brand work with these small villages to share their mezcal production with the world. The villages, in-turn, receive prosperity through the partnership. Del Maguey’s culture of sustainability is displayed through the way they distribute the product. The products are labeled and sold according to the village or villages it was made in. This gives consumers the feeling of connectedness and an ability to envision what and who they are contributing to through their purchase of the product. This company is now owned by Pernod Ricard.
The Illegal Mezcal brand is built around the founder’s experience of falling in love with the product and then smuggling it across the border into Guatemala. The brand has surrounded itself with the idea that the spirit is a big part of the music and art culture in Mexico. This brand carries three types of mezcal and separates them by age. They sell the Joven, which is two months old or less; reposado, which is two months to one year; and anejo, which is one year to three years old. This brand touts a coolness factor that Del Maguey does not. Bacardi now has a stake in the Illegal brand.
The Fidencio brand offers varieties of mezcal from three different types of agave, they have three products using Espadin agave as we as products that use Tobla and Madrecuixe. This is a top-shelf brand, but the website is rather buggy, so be cautious when visiting it. They do have Instagram and Twitter accounts, where random photos of bar scenes and the product are posted.
The Scorpion Mezcal brand is centered around the scorpion that they add to the bottle. They offer six types of plain mezcal and three of them are considered top shelf. The company also offers flavored mezcal and whiskey. The flavored mezcal is called Escorpion. They are small batch limited edition mezcals that come with a variety of added flavors including cinnamon and kiwi.
Sombra has one mezcal offering. This company is very similar to Del Maguey in the way they are marketing themselves. Much of the website talks about sustainability and the villages that they are helping through the production and distribution of the product. The founder had been a Master Sommelier when he fell in love with the Oaxaca people and decided to start a mezcal business.
The El Jolgorio brand is another mezcal similar to Del Maguey that focuses on selling each village's mezcal separately. They also market bottles mezcal produced from of many types of agave. All of these offerings make a total of 17 different mezcal products distributed into the market. The company is focused on the locality and take pride in their heritage and work.
The Real Minero company is a family business that has been around since 1978. They are focused on the community and sustainability. These are high-end product offerings separated by the type and age of agave used in them. They offer tours of the growing areas as well as mezcal tastings to interested parties.

UPCOMING MEZCAL CRAFTERS
Upon visiting the Pierde Almas mezcal website it is immediately apparent that this company is similar to Del maguey in the way that it talks about social responsibility and the environment. Everything down to the labels on the bottles is handcrafted. They offer products by agave type. They are increasing the alcohol content to 48%, which is what it is distilled as, and they have rights to many inventions around mezcal production. The company is also working to restore wild agave populations where they have been depleted.
Mezcal Alipus is part of Craft Distillers. Mezcal distillation occurs at small family owned distilleries in Oaxaca state. They believe that each bottle represents the individuality and creativity of each person involved in the process. They list out each distiller with a description and photo on their website. The company has many product offerings in addition to mezcal. The mezcals are sold in bottles specifically from each distillery. Each bottle comes with a product sheet describing where and how the mezcal was produced.
CONCLUSION
The mezcal market size was not able to be determined, but it is expected to gown at an annual rate of 17.8%-21.71% until 2022 and result in a market size of $840 million at that time. There are many brands of mezcal due to the origins of the product. The product is grown and distilled in a number of villages mainly in Oaxacan state. Currently, popular brands include Del Maguey, Illegal, Fidencio, Scorpion, Sombra, El Jolgorio, and Real Minero. Two handcrafted upcoming brands that were covered were Pierde Almas and Mezcal Alipus.
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