Meow Wolf Perceptions

Part
01
of one
Part
01

Meow Wolf Perceptions

Based on your feedback and further research, we found that Meow Wolf is making huge business strides and becoming a force to reckon with in the United States art scene. This is in spite of critics who disapprove of its admissions-based model and others who claim Meow Wolf is just another form of gentrification in Denver's poor areas. Below is a detailed overview of our findings.

perceptions and sentiments about the immersive art experience Meow Wolf

Writing for Rolling Stone, Dylan Owens notes that Meow Wolf has grown from humble beginnings to a company with 400 employees who are changing the art scene as we know it. Despite criticizing Meow Wolf for its admissions-based model, Ben Davis — an American art critic — agrees with Dylan and refers to the company as the future of art. “I have seen the future of art,” Davis wrote. “That future has a name, and it is an unlikely one: Meow Wolf.”

Meow Wolf has also been spending big on local artists prior to their Denver installation launch in 2020, but not all benefiting artists have embraced their entry into the immersive art scene. Some artists in Denver fear that Meow Wolf is only swooping in to take advantage of Denver's economy while gentrifying the city at the expense of its culture. Part of the established art world has openly criticized Meow Wolf as a culture killer whose main aim is to impress millennials. However, resident artists like Wayne Coyne appreciate the atmosphere at Meow Wolf where people are open to interact with each other during performances. “I don’t like going to shows where once the band starts to play, you have to shut up and pay attention,” Coyne says. “It’s an isolated experience. Meow Wolf and Flaming Lips aren’t like that. We want you all messing with each other the whole time.”

According to Neil Fauerso's review of Meow Wolf, it's shocking how popular the company has become. Despite visiting Meow Wolf on a Monday, Neil found the place packed, a discovery which made him presume that the company makes a lot of money considering their $25 entry fee. Neil considers Meow Wolf as the most influential space when it comes to the expansion of immersive art exhibits in the United States. Christina Rees was a bit more critical of the aesthetics when reviewing her experience at Meow Wolf. According to Christina, this art installation resembles a theme park created by designers and brilliant craftsmen but not artists. To sum up her review, Christina notes that Meow Wolf is okay and gets the job done when it comes to delivering immersive art experiences but it's not a place for serious artists looking for self-actualization.

Timothy Schuler was impressed by not spending most of his time queuing at Meow Wolf unlike other art places he has visited recently. Meow Wolf is a stark contrast to other experiences where visitors are encouraged to interact with the art by taking selfies to post on social media. The undocumentable nature of the pieces on display helps visitors to concentrate more on immersing themselves in the art when they go to Meow Wolf.
Sources
Sources

Quotes
  • "Though some more-traditional gatekeepers might fear it, Meow Wolf’s ascendance is hard to deny. Even as he bemoaned the consequences of its “admissions-based model,” critic Ben Davis coined a genre for the movement: Big Fun Art. Coming from a critic, that doubles as a back-handed compliment."
Quotes
  • "One thing I found striking was how incredibly popular it is. It was packed on a Monday; it must make an absolute fortune. (It costs $25 to get in, which is Louvre/Met/Chinati money.) I don’t think it’s a stretch to consider Meow Wolf the most influential development for the proliferation of immersive art exhibits in museums over the last couple years."