Menstruation Activists and Influencers

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Menstruation Activists and Influencers

Seven activists and influencers focused on menstruation are Lara Briden, Sophie Houser, Nadya Okamoto, Amika George, Christina Bobel, Mandu Reid, and Hazel Mead.

LARA BRIDEN

  • Located in New Zealand, Lara Briden is a naturopathic doctor focused specifically on women's health and, in particular, menstruation.
  • She describes herself as a "period revolutionary," and says that her "mission is to empower women to have easy, symptomless periods and join the worldwide 'period revolution'".
  • She is the author of a book titled "Period Repair Manual: Natural Treatment for Better Hormones and Better Periods".
  • Briden has been identified here as an influencer/activist in the field because of her work both medically and as an author focused on the topic of menstrual health.
  • Briden can be found on Twitter, where she has 4,387 followers.
  • Briden can also be found on Instagram, where she has 55.5k followers, and consistently posts menstruation-focused photos and images.

SOPHIE HOUSER

  • Sophie Houser is a software developer who uses her skills in STEM as an activist focused on menstruation equity. She is the co-creator of a game called "Tampon Run" which was created "in 2014 with Andrea Gonzales to combat the menstrual taboo".
  • Houser now works as a public speaker focused on a range of topics, including "the menstrual taboo".
  • She is also the author of the book "Girl Code", which tells the story of how she and Gonzalez co-created "Tampon Run" to bring attention to and reduce taboos around menstruation.
  • Houser has been included as an influencer and activist in this area because of her extensive work as a game developer, author, and public speaker.
  • Houser can be found on Instagram, where she has 1,321 followers.
  • Both Houser and Gonzalez can be found on Twitter, where they have 1,014 followers.

NADYA OKAMOTO

  • As a teenager, Nadya Okamoto spent time in neighborhoods with high homeless populations, and dedicated herself to learning more about how that situation impacted women's ability to deal with their periods each month, which later led to her researching menstruation and its impact in general.
  • "At the time, I’d been thinking so much about privilege as a spectrum. I did all this research about the tampon tax and girls missing school because of their periods, and I got so worked up."
  • Working from her frustration about this, Okamoto founded the company PERIOD, which is "a global, youth-run NGO devoted to reducing period stigma and period poverty".
  • PERIOD works both at the policy-level — working "to slash taxes on menstrual hygiene products" — and on-the-ground to help bring personal hygiene products to "school bathrooms and other public spaces".
  • In addition to her work as the founder of PERIOD, Okamoto is the author of a book on the subject titled "Period Power: A Manifesto for the Menstrual Movement".
  • Okamoto has been included as an activist here because of her work both as the founder of PERIOD and as an author focused on the subject.
  • She can be found on Twitter, where she has 3,549 followers.
  • She can also be found on Instagram, where she has 1,980 followers.

AMIKA GEORGE

  • After learning that 10 percent of girls in the U.K. can't afford the sanitary products necessary to deal with their periods, Amika George decided to launch the #FreePeriods Campaign, the goal of which was to "pressure the government to make sanitary products free for girls in the country".
  • The campaign began with an online petition, which went viral via social media and led to 2,000 protesters gathering in London, ultimately leading "the U.K. government to pledge about $2 million in funds collected from the tampon tax toward initiatives to end "period poverty".
  • George has been included here as an activist because of the major impact her work had on her country's policies concerning menstruation.
  • She can be found on Twitter, where she has 9,909 followers.
  • She can also be found on Instagram, where she has 5,527 followers.

CHRISTINA BOBEL

  • Christina Bobel is the president of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research, and is a professor at the University of Massachusetts.
  • "We have to attack the shame and secrecy, we have to make menstruation visible. Until we do, products — no matter how hi-tech or widely available — will not change the way to encounter our bodies as the rich and wonderful resources they are."
  • She is also the author of a book on the subject, "The Managed Body: Developing Girls and Menstrual Health in the Global South", which is set to be released in November of this year.
  • Bobel has been included as an activist and influencer here because of her work as an author and speaker, as well as in her role as president of the Society for Menstrual Cycle Research.
  • She can be found on Twitter, where she has 2,247 followers.

MANDU REID

  • Mandu Reid is the founder of the company The Cup Effect, which is aimed at helping women to learn how to effectively use menstrual cups instead of tampons or pads.
  • "Reid is part of a new wave of period activists, determined to challenge the status quo of our flows."
  • The goal of Reid's company, The Cup Effect, "is to make it easier for women and girls across the world to live, work, and study with dignity, comfort, and confidence, whilst also protecting the planet by reducing the number of disposable menstrual products in use".
  • Reid has been included here as an activist and influencer because of her work with the company The Cup Effect.
  • Reid can be found on Twitter, where she has 2,877 followers.
  • She can also be found on Instagram, where she has 3,051 followers.

HAZEL MEAD

  • Hazel Mead is an artist and activist focused on reducing the stigma surrounding menstruation.
  • She has worked with the campaigns Bloody Good Period and Freda to reduce shame and stigma surrounding girls and women on their periods.
  • Mead describes herself as being a feminist and activist who is "period positive".
  • She has been included here as an activist and influencer because of her extensive work with various campaigns aimed at reducing period stigma.
  • Mead can be found on Twitter, where she has 1,194 followers.
  • She can also be found on Instagram, where she has 93.3k followers and regularly shares period-themed art.
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