Men's Big & Tall

Part
01
of two
Part
01

Market Size - Big & Tall Men

The defined target segment makes up for a very tiny percentage of the total US population (0.0282%). This translates to a number count of 91,843 people. Below you will find a deep dive into our findings.

FINDINGS

We browsed media articles, research reports and census reports for pre-compiled information on the defined target segment, but did not find anything pertaining specifically to this segment. Any reports we came across on the Big and Tall category in the given time did not specifically mention this sub-segment. However, we have triangulated an estimate of the target groups population with a fairly good level of accuracy.

The target segment defined is as follows:
Sex: Male
Height: Greater than 6’5
Weight: 275 lbs.
Waist: 38 to 60
It is understood that all the above criteria must fit the target segment.
The Census Bureau estimated the population of the US to be 325,719,178 as of July 1, 2017.
We know the total female population in the US is 50.5% of the total population. Correspondingly, the male population is 49.5% of the total population.
The percentage of the US population that is in their 20s = 14%
The percentage of the US population that is in their 30s = 13%
The percentage of the US population that is in their 40s = 13%
The percentage of the US population between 25 and 29 (including both) can be assumed to be half the population in the 20s (20-29).
Therefore, the percentage of population that is between 25 and 29 (including both) years of age = 7%
Hence, the percentage of the total population between 25 and 49 years of age (including both) = Percentage of the US population between 25 and 29 + Percentage of the US population that is in their 30s + Percentage of the US population that is in their 40s = 7%+ 13%+13% = 33%
The sex ratio for the age category 25 to 29 is assumed to be the same as the sex ratio of the general US population.
Therefore, the percentage of men aged between 25 and 49 years in the total US population = Percentage of male population in the total population between 25 and 49 years * Percentage of the total population between 25 and 49 years of age = 49.5% * 33% = 16.335%
The total male population in the US between ages of 25 and 49 = Percentage of men aged between 25 and 49 years in the total US population * Total population of the US = 16.335% * 325,719,178 = 53, 206, 228
Similarly,
The population of men in the US who are between 25 and 29 years of age = 7% * 49.5% * 325,719,178 = 11,286,170
The population of men in the US who are in their 30s = 13% * 49.5% * 325,719,178 = 20,960,029
The population of men in the US who are in their 40s = 13% * 49.5% * 325,719,178 = 20,960,029
We know from the Height Percentile Calculator:
--99.606 percentage of the US male population in its 20s is less than 6’5 in height. We will assume that this percentage will remain unchanged for men between 25 and 29 years of age.
--99.606 percentage of the US male population in its 30s is less than 6’5 in height.
--99.450 percentage of the US male population in its 40s is less than 6’5 in height.
Therefore, population of men in the US between 25 and 29 years of age (including both) and not shorter than 6’5 = Percentage of the US male population between 25 and 29 years of age (including both) that is taller not shorter than 6’5 * The population of men in the US who are between 25 and 29 years of age (including both) = (100-99.606) * 11,286,170 = 44,468
Similarly,
The population of men in the US in their 30s and not shorter than 6’5 = (100-99.606) * 20,960,029 = 82,583
The population of men in the US in their 40s and not shorter than 6’5 = (100-99.450) * 20,960,029 = 115,280
Therefore, the total population of men in the US between 25 and 49 years of age and not shorter than 6’5 = Population of men in the US between 25 and 29 years of age (including both) and not shorter than 6’5 + population of men in the US in their 30s and not shorter than 6’5 + population of men in the US in their 40s and not shorter than 6’5 = 44,468 + 82,583 + 115,280 = 242,331
Now, we will determine how many of these men who are aged between 25 and 49 years and 6’5 or taller weigh more than or equal to 275 lbs.
So, as a first step, we will calculate the Body Mass Index (BMI) (using a BMI calculator) to find if our target segment is classified as obese.
The BMI for a man who is 6’5 (195.58 cm) tall and weighs 275 lbs. (124.74 kg) is 32.6, which is higher than the obesity threshold of 30. To put it simply, a man that is 6’5 tall and weighs 275 lbs. is considered to be obese.
By trial and error (using the BMI calculator) we find that a man who is 6’ 8.27 (203.9 cm) and 275 lbs. will have BMI of 30.
Therefore, any man who is between 6’ 5 and 6’ 8.27 and weighs 275 lbs. or more is considered obese.
Using the Height Percentile Calculator we will find the number of men aged between 25 and 49 who are taller than 6.8.27 “(203.9 cm).
We find,
--99.993 percentage of the US male population in its 20s is less than 6’ 8.27” in height. We will assume that this percentage will remain unchanged for men between 25 and 29 years of age.
--99.993 percentage of the US male population in its 30s is less than 6’ 8.27 in height.
--99.988 percentage of the US male population in its 40s is less than 6’ 8.27 in height.
Calculations for finding the population of men in the US equal to or taller than 6’ 8.27 will be done in the same manner as that for those equal to or taller than 6’ 5.
Therefore,
The total population of men in the US between 25 and 49 years of age and not shorter than 6’ 8.27 = (100-99.993) * 11,286,170 = 790
The population of men in the US in their 30s and not shorter than 6’ 8.27 = (100-99.993) * 20,960,029 = 1,467
The population of men in the US in their 40s and not shorter than 6’ 8.27 = (100-99.988) * 20,960,029 = 2,515
Therefore, population of men in the US between 25 and 29 years of age and not shorter than 6’ 8.27 = 790 +1,467 +2,515 = 4,772
We find that only 4,772 men in the US aged between 25 and 49 years are equal to or taller than 6’ 8.27. This is a very small percentage of the total number of men in the US aged between 25 and 49 years and equal to or taller than 6’ 5 (242,331). To be exact it is just 1.97% (4,772*100/242,331) of the total men in the US who are aged between 25 and 49 years and equal to or taller than 6’5. Since the number is insignificant, and since a portion of this small population is also likely to be obese, we will assume that any man in the US between the ages of 25 and 49, who is 6’5 or more in height and weighs more than or equal to 275 lbs. is obese. The BMI chart gives a visual representation of obesity as a function of weight and height and therefore makes for a good reference in case further clarity is required.
Now, the final criterion is that the waist size of these men should be between 38 and 60. We know that when the waist size to height ratio of a man is over 0.54 he is considered obese—this is just another method (other than BMI) to classify obesity.
We find that for a man who is 6’5 and has a waist of 38 the waist to height ratio is 0.49 (49%, using the Waist to Height Ratio Calculator), which is considered a healthy weight (not obese). Logically, any man who is taller than 6’5 and has a waist size of 38 also cannot be considered obese.
Therefore, any man who is 6’5 or taller and weighs 275 lbs.—considered obese-- will have a waist size greater than 38. The criteria that waist size of a managed between 25 and 49 years and weighing 275 pounds should be greater than 38”.

Now, we know that men with waist sizes in the 40 and 46 inches range make up for 65% (revenue wise) of the Big and Tall apparel market. It would imply that a significantly large portion of our target group falls into this category. Given this, it would be fairly accurate to assume that the number of men in the US aged between 25 and 49 years, 6’5 or taller and equal to or more than 275 lbs. in weight would largely have waist sizes under 60. The ones who have a waist size larger than 60 are likely to be a very tiny fraction.
So, all said and done, we can consider that our entire target segment is obese with a good level of accuracy.
Now, we know that 37.9% of the adults aged over 20 years are obese. This is the latest figure (for 2013-14) published by the National Centre for Health Statistics.
The population of men in the US aged between 25 and 49 and who are 6’5 or taller was found to be 242,331 (earlier in this report). A final assumption we will make is that the rate of obesity in this category will be the same as the general rate of obesity for adults in the US.
The population of our target segment (6’5 or taller men in the US who weight 275 lbs. or more and have waist sizes between 38 and 60) = Rate of obesity in the target segment * Population of men taller than 6’ 5
The population of our target segment = 37.9 * 242,331 = 91,843

Expressing this in percentage terms:

As a percentage of the total US population = 91,843/ 325,719,178 = 0.0282%

As a percentage of the number of men in the US aged between 25 and 49 years = 91,843/ 53, 206, 228 = 0.1726%

As a percentage of men who are taller than 6'5" = obesity rate = 37.9%

CONCLUSION

The defined target segment--men in the US who are between 25 and 49 years of age (including both limits) weigh over 275 lbs. and are 6'5" or taller--makes up for 0.0282% of the entire US population.


Part
02
of two
Part
02

Spending Patterns - Big & Tall Men

There is no evidence that the spending patterns of male big & tall consumers exists in the public domain. However, there are other important related findings that are included in this brief and are discussed in detail. In general, men spend well short of their female counterparts. Despite this the US apparel market for big & tall men is worth between $3.5 to $4 billion per year. In addition, there is a limited availability of brick-and-mortar stores catering to big & tall men. As a result, new avenues for sales are opening up in the form of subscription box services, as has been embraced by retailer JCPenney. An Apparel Magazine case study on DXL gives some insight into the challenges and opportunities of the big & tall market.

SPENDING PATTERNS

The average male and female adult aged 25-44 spends $185 per month on clothing. Men in the 25-34 age bracket spend on average $161 per month, while men aged 35-44 spend $209 per month. The difference could be attributable to the higher mean income within the older age group.
Looking just at male spending habits, we found that males over the age of 16 spend on average $323 per year, or $26.92 per month. Males aged 45-54 spent the most at $121 more per year than men aged 35-44. We were unable to find statistics on spending habits by big & tall male consumers broken down by age category.
Destination XL Group, a specialist retailer of big & tall men's apparel, believe that the US apparel market for big & tall men is worth around $3.5 to $4 billion per year. Pointing to potential market opportunity, Levi Strauss & Co notes that plus-size clothing (male and female) accounts for 17 percent of their total sales in the US market.

AVAILABILITY

The marked difference in spending habits between males and females, noted above, is also reflected in the availability of gender-specific clothing stores for plus-sized people. While females are catered to with 6,000 dedicated stores, only 1,000 stores cater to plus-size men. Even more stark, revenue generated by stores for women amounted to $9 billion, compared to $1 billion from male counterparts.
Major retailers account for the most popular stores that cater to big & tall men. This includes Nordstrom, Macy’s, J. Crew, GAP, Old Navy, and Banana Republic, the last three being owned by Gap Inc.

NEW DIRECTIONS

The limited availability of brick-and-mortar stores for the big & tall man has given rise to new opportunities in the form of subscription box services. In 2016, The Winston Box was launched as a $75 per month subscription service catering exclusively to big & tall men, offering “casual, classic, and contemporary styles” ranging from sizes from XL through 6XL, and 46 to 68 inch chest-sizes. Each box contains 2-4 new items of clothing.
In December 2017, JCPenney in partnership with Bombfell, also launched a new subscription service for big & tall men. With an average price of $39 per item, the service offers a wide range of styles along with a personal stylist.

TRENDING FASHION IN THE BIG & TALL CATEGORY

Online retailer Bestproducts.com recently had a promotion showcasing the bestsellers in the US within the plus-size category, giving insight into what type of clothing men are purchasing the most, and their brands:
Boohoo Big and Tall Camo Field Jacket
Adidas Originals Superstar Cuffed Track Pant
ASOS Plus 2 Pack Slim Chinos
Tommy Hilfiger Plus Blue Oxford Shirt
Levi’s 501 Original Fit Stretch Jeans
ASOS Plus Blue Bomber
Brandon Kyle High-Waist Black Pant
Ralph Lauren Classic Fit Soft-Touch Polo

CASE STUDY: DESTINATION XL

In 2016, Apparel Magazine took a deep look into big & tall specialist retailer, Destination XL (DXL). According to DXL, men with waists 40-46 inches comprise 65 percent of the big & tall market, yet only comprise 25 percent of ‘casual male’ business. Males with a 48-inch chest, despite having greater incomes than the smaller peers, did not tend to spend much on apparel.
DXL note that big & tall men tend to be under-catered for, with retailers carrying very few items. This created a market opportunity for DXL, who opened their first four stores in 2010. They are now a leader in the big & tall market with 180 locations, as at September 2016. DXL revenues in 2015 were $442.2 million, up 6.8 percent from the previous year. According to Apparel Magazine, DXL President and CEO David Levin believes the reason for their dominance in the market comes down to the fact that “virtually nobody else is in this business is because it's very difficult to manage the inventory,” referring to the need for a complex planning and allocation system that has to wrestle with some items that come in more than 50 different size combinations.

CONCLUSION

Men in general, aged 25-34, spend on average $161 per month, while men aged 35-44 spend $209 per month. Males over the age of 16 spend on average $323 per year, or $26.92 per month, well short of their female counterparts. Males aged 45-54 spent the most at $121 more per year than men aged 35-44. However, a breakdown of spending habits specifically for male big & tall consumers is not available in the public domain.
Sources
Sources