Media Use of African and Filipino Immigrants

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Media Use of African and Filipino Immigrants

While we did not find precompiled information for any part of this request, we did find enough data to triangulate smart phone and social media usage. We found that 102,484 adult African immigrants, and 34,022 adult Filipino immigrants in New York City use a smart phone. We also found that 93,944 adult African immigrants and 31,187 adult Filipino immigrants use social media. Based on self-reported usage, the top five social media platforms for all of the United States are Facebook, YouTube, Facebook Messenger, Twitter and Instagram.

We were unable to find or triangulate data on newspapers, due to the difficulty in tracking subscriptions that could be digital, physical, or both. Broadly speaking, in 2016 an estimated 34,657,199 daily newspapers were circulated in the United States.

We were also unable to find or triangulate data on radio listenership, due to the fact that stations can be listened to over the airwaves or streamed online. According to News Generation, 93% of Americans listen to AM/FM radio over the airwaves. Our deep dive, along with an explanation of what information was publicly unavailable, is below.

Methodology & Assumptions

We searched United States census data, industry reports, and trusted media sites for information on media platform usage of African and Filipino immigrants in New York City. Please note that the census data is provided in two screen shots, one for African immigrants and one for Filipino immigrants. This is because the URL links would direct back to an empty table, with all search criteria erased.

Our triangulated data for smart phones and social media is on adults 18 years of age and older. We chose to focus on adults for several reasons. That was the age group for which we could find hard numbers for smart phone usage. We also took social media age restrictions into account.

Smart Phones

According to We Are Social, 72% of the adult population in the United States uses a smartphone. Using triangulation, we found that 102,484 adult African immigrants, and 34,022 adult Filipino immigrants in New York City use a smart phone.

(1.) African Immigrants
According to United States census data from 2016, there are 154,885 African-born residents living in New York City, with 91.9% age 18 years or older. This comes out to 142,339 African immigrants who are adults.

154,885 total African immigrants * 91.9% adults =
142,339 adult African immigrants

From there, we figured out how many of the 142,339 adult African immigrants use a smartphone:

142,339 adult African immigrants * 72% of the adult population =
102,484 adult African immigrants use a cell phone

(2.) Adult Filipino Immigrants
No data was available on New York City residents born in the Philippines. There are 53,514 people who both identify as Filipino and were born outside of the United States, with 88.3% age 18 years or older.

53,514 foreign-born Filipinos * 88.3% adults =
47, 253 foreign-born, adult Filipinos

47, 253 foreign-born, adult Filipinos * 72% of the adult population =
34,022 adult Filipino immigrants use a cell phone

Social Media

According to We Are Social, the top five social media platforms for all of the United States are Facebook, YouTube, Facebook Messenger, Twitter and Instagram. "Top" is based on self-reported usage. Additionally, social media penetration has reached 66%. We searched industry reports and trusted media sites, and could not find data on New York City or even New York state.

Using triangulation, we found that 93,944 adult African immigrants and 31,187 Filipino adult immigrants use social media.

(1.) African Immigrants
142,339 adult African immigrants * 66% social media penetration =
93,944 adult African immigrants use social media

(2.) Filipino Immigrants
47,253 foreign-born, adult Filipinos * 66% social media penetration =
31,187 adult Filipino immigrants use social media

Newspapers

We were unable to find precompiled data on newspaper subscriptions or readership. In addition to reading English language newspapers, we assumed that immigrants may also read newspapers in their native language. The number of languages spoken in both Africa and the Philipines made searching for foreign language newspaper circulations in the NYC metro impractical. According to World Atlas, there are 21 languages spoken in the Philipines. And according to the United Nations, there are 54 individual countries in Africa.

Another factor that made researching newspaper readership and subscriptions impractical is that subscriptions may be digital, physical, or both. Additionally, readership of newspapers of any language, including English, is difficult to track, considering people could read newspapers that they didn't purchase, such as at a library or work. After searching industry reports and trusted media sites, we did not find enough data to triangulate numbers specific to African and Filipino immigrants in New York City. Broadly speaking, we found that in 2016, an estimated 34,657,199 daily newspapers were circulated in the United States.

Radio

As with newspapers, we were unable to find precompiled data on radio listenership. The sheer number of languages spoken by African and Filipino immigrants, combined with the fact that many radio stations of all languages stream online, make researching impractical. After searching industry reports and trusted media sites, we did not find enough data to triangulate numbers specific to African and Filipino immigrants in New York City. According to News Generation, 93% of Americans listen to AM/FM radio over the airwaves.

Conclusion

We triangulated that 102,484 adult African immigrants, and 34,022 adult Filipino immigrants in New York City use a smart phone.

We also triangulated that 93,944 adult African immigrants and 31,187 adult Filipino immigrants use social media. Based on self-reported usage, the top five social media platforms for all of the United States are Facebook, YouTube, Facebook Messenger, Twitter and Instagram.

Due to the broad scope of newspapers and radio stations, we were unable to find data specific to African and Filipino immigrants in New York City.
Sources
Sources