Market size and trends in leadership development

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Part
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K – 12 Leadership development-Market size

While we were unable to locate information which directly answers your question, we have developed a series of triangulations to provide you with several estimates for the market size (in TAM) for K-12 leadership development for teachers and administrators in the U.S. The result of these triangulations are as follows:

-- The market size for administrator leadership development is 6,580 school districts, with a slightly higher level of interest among non-suburban schools.

-- The market size for teacher leadership development is 14,000 school districts, 2.8 million - 2.85 million teachers, and 104,193 schools.

Methodology

In order to answer your question, we utilized government databases, along with industry reports and surveys in order to analyze the level of interest in leadership development among school districts, administrators, and teachers within the U.S. K-12 education market. In doing so, we were able to come up with several estimates for the market size, in TAM, for K-12 leadership development.

While we first began this research by attempting to locate direct market sizing information, we did not locate any such information after searching exhaustively through market reports, leadership reports, and trusted media sites. We also attempted to look for information which would allow us to triangulate an estimate in dollars, however without further information pertaining to the specific type of leadership development service and/or program to focus on, this cannot be achieved, since doing so would require us to examine the average costs associated with such as product. "Leadership development" is too broad of a term from which to understand the type of product or service being focused on. Therefore, we choose to instead provide the market size in terms of the total addressable market, or individuals/organizations who would be potential buyers within this market.

level of interest in leadership

For the first part of this triangulation, we located data which reflects the level of interest, or potential interest, in leadership development for teachers and administrators in K-12 schools located in the U.S. Below, we have listed the applicable data we located which we will further use for our final triangulation:

*Please note that the Gallup survey mentioned below needs to be downloaded for free before being accessed, and therefore, the information cited from this source links to the download page for this report.

-- A 2016 Gallup Survey of superintendents in K-12 school districts reported that 53% of superintendents feel "their district has an effective leadership coaching program in place for school and district administrators," while 16% stated that they either disagree or strongly disagree with this statement. We assume that these insights reflect some level of potential interest in leadership development for administrators and school staff for the 47% percent (or, 100% -53%) of superintendents who were either neutral or disagreed with this statement, and likely a high level of potential interest in leadership development for the 16% who said they disagree or strongly disagree with this statement. Additionally, there is a slightly higher percentage of non-suburban district superintendents who disagreed with this statement, which we assume might suggest a higher need (and therefore a higher level of potential interest) for leadership development in non-suburban school districts.

-- The 2016 Gallup Survey of K-12 superintendents also revealed that 100% either agree (9%) or strongly agree (91%) that "developing teachers is an important role of principals." We assume that this insight supports a high level of interest in development of teachers within the K-12 environment.

The Teaching, Empowering, Leading & Learning (TELL) Arizona survey conducted in 2017 surveyed 51,862 educators in Arizona. Of these respondents, 94% were teachers, while the remainder of respondents were school principals and other education professionals. While this survey was isolated to Arizona, we used this survey as a proxy which we assume would reflect the sentiments of most educators across the U.S. Below, we have listed some insights from this survey:

-- Of survey respondents to this question, 17% said they either disagree or strongly disagree that teachers are effective leaders. We believe this shows an equivalent level of potential interest in leadership development for teachers.

-- Of survey respondents to this question, 78% said that their school "makes a sustained effort" to address teacher leadership. We believe that this insight suggests that, although most teachers are already perceived as effective leaders, schools still have a high level of interest in further developing these leadership skills.

-- Of survey respondents to this question, 79% said that their school "makes a sustained effort" to address professional learning. This insight further supports the idea that schools have a high level of potential interest in further developing the skills and knowledge of their staff.

To recap the collective findings above, we assess that 47% of school districts would likely be interested in leadership development for their administrative staff, especially those located in non-suburban districts. All districts display interest in teacher development. Around 78-79% of teachers/educators and schools are interested in continually developing the leadership skills of teachers. We will use these percentages to further triangulate an estimate for the market size (in TAM) of leadership development for K-12 teachers and administrators in the U.S.

total size of the k-12 education market in the u.s.

The second step of this triangulation required us to locate data which showed the total size of the K-12 market in the U.S. Using this information, we will then apply the percentages above to these total market sizes in order to develop several estimates for the market size for leadership development specifically.

-- Number of school districts in the U.S.:
Around 14,000, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Triangulation:
As noted above, 47% of school districts would likely be interested in leadership development for their administrative staff, especially those located in non-suburban districts. Therefore, we calculate a market size of 6,580 school districts (or, 47% of 14,000).

As noted above, all districts display interest in teacher development, therefore the market size for teacher development would be around 14,000 districts.

-- Number of K-12 teachers in the U.S.:
According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2017 there were 3.2 million public school teachers, and 0.4 million private school teachers. This equates to 3.6 million teachers total.

Triangulation:
As noted above, around 78-79% of teachers/educators and schools are interested in continually developing the leadership skills of teachers. Therefore, we calculate a market size of around 2.8 million - 2.85 million teachers (or, 78-79% of 3.6 million).

-- Number of K-12 schools in the U.S.:
In 2013-2014, there were 98,271 public schools, and 33,890 private schools. This equates to a total of 131,890 schools. The 2013-2014 data is the most recent data made available on this topic by the National Center for Education Statistics.

Triangulation:
As noted above, around 78-79% of teachers/educators and schools are interested in continually developing the leadership skills of teachers. Therefore, we calculate a market size of around 102,874 to 104,193 schools (or, 78-79% of 131,890).

conclusion

In closing, the market size for administrator leadership development in K-12 U.S. schools is 6,580 school districts, with a slightly higher level of interest among non-suburban school districts; the market size for teacher leadership development in K-12 U.S. schools is 14,000 school districts, 2.8 million - 2.85 million teachers, and 104,193 schools.

Part
02
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Part
02

K – 12 Leadership development-Trends

Self-directed professional development, backward design planning, responsiveness to multiple learning styles, crowd-sourced learning, micro-credentialing & digital badging, sustained inquiry, mentoring and coaching programs, and organizing learning networks are all current market trends for leadership development in the K-12 education space.

METHODOLOGY

In order to answer this question I first looked for industry reports on this sector, in order to identify the current trends. However, I found that there are no industry reports distinct to this specific field. I believe that this is because the field is too niche to have been studied as its own market. I also looked for academic studies on the topic, but again there was little information available. Then I looked for recently published articles on the topic, and extracted some relevant trends from these. Due to the scarcity of recent data on the subject some information has been selected which refers to professional development of educators in this space, and has been related back to leadership development. I have also included some additional related findings which may be of interest.

TRENDS

— Self-Directed Professional Development: This article tells us that there has been an increase in the past few years in self-directed professional development for US educators. This trend involves the use of interactive online webinars, videos and other content that can be streamed through web browsers. Leadership development is being pursued in this way by teachers in the K-12 education space, who are taking learning into their own hands. The trend relies heavily on the use of online learning tools, such as those listed above.

— Backward Design Planning: Another trend in leadership development in the K-12 education space is that learners (educators/administration staff) are following development plans that have a backward design. They begin with a larger vision of end goals which a learning plan is designed backwards from.

— Responsive to Multiple Learning Styles: The old, one-size-fits-all approach to learning which focuses mostly on knowledge being shared in lecture styles, has gone out of favor in the educator leadership development space. Learner-centric offerings are the focus of this space, which include hands-on, social, and multi-modal learning opportunities, incorporating text, audio, video, and graphics.

— Crowd-Sourced Learning: Crowd-sourced learning is bringing the focus to the importance of the "collective input of educators". Crowd-sourced learning incorporates the views of many educators who seek leadership development, and create learning experiences that put the learners at the center of their own learning. Edcamps is an example of this trend, they have developed "unconference events" that have rapidly risen in popularity. At these events "learning is participant-driven as sessions for the day are determined organically with teachers themselves indicating topics on which they want to learn and topics on which they want share".

— Micro-Credentialing & Digital Badging: Educators who are pursuing leadership development have pushed for the trend of micro-credentialing and digital badging. This has come for educators wanting validated recognition of their learning. More courses now incorporate these features to ensure that learners can share their accomplishments.

— Sustained Inquiry: This trend focuses on educators seeking leadership development through working together in connected spaces. Sustained inquiry allows development through thinking about problems "through an iterative process of design thinking with trial, evaluation, redefining, and re imagining."

— Mentoring and Coaching Programs: A study of schools across the US found that currently there is a trend for schools to offer mentoring and coaching programs to educators in order to support their leadership development.

— Organizing Learning Networks: Schools in the US are organizing learning networks in order to provide a support network for educators who are seeking leadership development.

ADDITIONAL FINDINGS

This 2018 article identifying current key trends in K-12 classrooms highlights encouraging leadership and individualized learning experiences as a major trend. It talks about how classrooms are being designed so that students can work in teams, as they would in the working world, and through this they develop leadership skills. (This is focused on student's leadership development rather than educators and administrators).

Finally, I have found that a possible future trend in this space is that of creating cohesive regional learning labs. This involves "integrating the incubation of new schools, the redesign of existing ones, and new approaches to principal leadership development". It is thought that this trend will cause a shift in design priorities of schools in order to make them more responsive.

CONCLUSION

To sum up, I have found that self-directed professional development, backward design planning, responsiveness to multiple learning styles, crowd-sourced learning, micro-credentialing & digital badging, sustained inquiry, mentoring and coaching programs, and organizing learning networks are all current market trends for leadership development in the K-12 education space.
Sources
Sources