Lifestyle Demographics

Part
01
of four
Part
01

Automotive Demographics

While there is limited data specific to the automotive industry’s C-Suite and senior management, the fact that the major demographic concern is the lack of women in the industry at all levels suggests that it is otherwise similar to other industries at the executive level. We have, therefore, provided key insights about demographics, online media habits, the best time to reach executives via online ads, and hobbies from cross-industry surveys, adding information specific to the auto industry where available.

DEMOGRAPHICS

  • The automotive industry has a shortage of women executives; just 8% in the top 20 companies, compared to 30% who have a C-Suite title and 39% who are in at least upper management in other industries.
  • Across the automotive manufacturing pipeline, women comprise only 13% of the C-Suite and 20% of managers.
  • The under-representation of women in decision-making roles reflects the relatively low number of women in the industry in general (26.7%).
  • The median age of a senior manager is just over 50 and those who have a C-Suite title average 52.3 years old.
  • 75% of execs are married and 72% have a college degree, with only 29% having a postgraduate degree.
  • 83% of C-Suite occupants are White, 7% are Hispanic, 8% are Asian, and 8% are Black.
  • However, among senior executives, 73% are White, 21% are Asian, 3% are Hispanic, and only 2% are Black.
  • 37% say that their “cultural or ethnic heritage is a very important part” of their lives.
BEST CHANNELS AND OPTIMAL TIMES
  • In terms of both reach (whether the ads are seen) and receptivity, websites are the most effective online channel (~75%/~50%, respectively), but are beaten in both categories by radio, magazines, and especially television.
The best channel to reach an executive depends on the time of day. Senior executives consume media as follows:
  • When they wake up (79%), at which time 50% read email newsletters.
  • Morning commute (45%), during which 37% listen to the radio and 21% listen to podcasts.
  • Arrive at office (41%), when 35% read news websites.
  • During the workday (54%), during which 25% use news apps and 29% read email newsletters.
  • Evening commute (39%), during which radio and podcasts spike again and 17% check social media.
  • Nighttime (64%), during which 37% check social media and 38% watch TV.
  • Weekend (100%), during which they consume media through a mix of the above sources.
When waking up and consuming news:
  • 37% read a news website
  • 37% view a news app
  • 31% go to social media
  • 25% read a news content aggregator
  • 50% read email newsletters
While there is no direct data on the click-through habits of executives in general, let alone automotive executives, the following data points are salient to the question:
  • 70% of purchase journeys are launched by the executive conducting their own online searches rather than by recommendations.
  • Only 10% of new products or services are introduced to executives through ads and only 12% through social media.
  • Based on the above data, we triangulate that the best time to reach a CEO via online or social media ads would be the early morning (pre-commute), evenings, and weekends.

HOBBIES

While no hard information exists on the hobbies of automotive executives, based on their magazine reading habits, executives, in general, have the following interests/hobbies:
  • Travel (61%)
  • Fashion, Beauty (43%)
  • Lifestyle (47%)
  • Fitness, Health (39%)
  • Cuisine (37%)
  • Shelter (37%)
  • Science, Technology (39%)
  • Entertainment (33%)
  • Regional (34%)
  • Sports (30%)
  • Outdoor (26%)

RESEARCH STRATEGY

Note: For the sake of brevity, we will refer to the combined pool of automotive executives, C-Suite employees, and senior managers as “executives” or “execs” in our data.

Having already located several surveys of executives in general, one of which was particularly rich with demographic data, we began our research by seeking either a similar survey specific to the automotive industry or articles which highlight how this industry might differ demographically than others. This led us to a series of articles highlighting how few women work in this industry at all, let alone at the top roles. Apart from this, we found no articles highlighting unusual demographic trends in the US despite a thorough search of top industry insider sources. That being the case, we took the general executive demographic data and used it in our findings whenever we could not find a contradictory source. Note that in the Ipsos survey data, we have used the “C-Suite Role” column except where otherwise indicated, as this includes those who claim to have C-Suite responsibilities within the company even if they don’t (yet) have the title, thus incorporating senior management.

We likewise found that there were no sources, whether insider or in the general news media and polling services, which had publicly published a survey of automotive executives which would provide any insight into their favorite media channels and when they are most likely to click through an ad. Likewise, a thorough search of interviews with senior automotive insiders in business news sources such as Forbes and Business Insider, as well as industry insider sources like Automotive News and the CBT Automotive Network did not yield any interviews in which that information had dropped, even anecdotally. However, we did find several pertinent data points about the media habits of executives in general from which we were able to triangulate the most likely channels and times. We have provided this information above.

In terms of automotive executive hobbies, we were unable to find any hard survey data which would allow us to pin this down, and collecting sufficient anecdotal evidence from interviews to reasonably derive an answer would require far more time than is available for a single Wonder request. However, we can derive interest in certain hobbies from a survey on the reading habits of executives by Ipsos, and have provided this information above.

Part
02
of four
Part
02

Healthcare Demographics

Men dominate the C-suite level positions in healthcare at 70%. The average age of a C-suite level executive is 54 years of age. Becker's Hospital Review, Healthcare Executive, The American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management, and the American College of Healthcare Administrators are all organizations with a wide reach for healthcare executives and would be appropriate mediums to use.

Executive Age demographics

  • The average age of a C-suite member is 54. The average age of a CEO is 58. CIOs come are the youngest with their average being 51.

Healthcare senior leadership Gender Demographics

  • Women make up 13% of CEOs and about 30% of senior leadership in healthcare settings, leaving the majority in senior leadership males.

Channels to contact hospital senior leadership

  • Becker's Hospital Review is widely read and offers print along with digital publications. They have 1.8 million monthly visitors, 3.4 million e-newsletter subscribers, and multiple yearly events.
  • HealthcareExecutive.org is a website for healthcare executives. This channel will let you reach over 40,000 top decision makers in health management. They have the #1 rated magazine, and the second most readers and exposure.
  • The American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management has a website that averages over 36,000 hits and 5,400 "user sessions" per month. Their average user spends 8.5 minutes on the website.
  • The American College of Healthcare Administrators offers digital marketing to reach their members. With this site, you can connect with leaders that are decision makers. They have 2,442 individual members, and 1,365 professional members. The top five titles are administrator, executive director, CEO, President, and Vice-President.

Best times to contact

  • The best time to send an email is around 10 AM.
  • The best day to send an email is Thursday. Although Thursday is the best day of the week, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, have similar open rates.
  • Open rates range from 18.2-19.6% and CTRs range from 4.14 to 4.90 during the week.
  • For phone calls, Wednesdays at 4 PM have the best success.
  • Although there have been multiple studies concerning the best days and times to send an email and make phone calls, it is best practice to experiment with your send/call times and keep logs of what works best for you.
  • When marketing to doctors, since it is such a busy industry, a value proposition must be offered. This could be in the form of a discount, white-paper, seminar or something the doctor can personally use. It would seem appropriate that these tactics would work for healthcare executives as well.

Hobbies

  • Popular hobbies in New York City include book clubs, knitting, jam making, photography, yoga, meditation, and writing.
  • Popular hobbies for technology executives (majority in Silicon Valley) include book clubs, Segway polo, playing instruments, beekeeping, baking, magic, and boating.
  • Popular hobbies for physicians include playing instruments, knitting, gardening, painting, writing, woodcarving, calligraphy, star-gazing, and birding.

Research strategy

We began our research by consulting industry websites such as Becker's Hospital Review, the US Bureau of Labor & Statistics, and O-Net. This research gave us employment demographics. We were unable to locate the ages of senior healthcare executives from any market research, the US Bureau of Labor & Statistics or O-Net. The closest numbers we found were for healthcare as a whole and were not relevant to research.

To locate contact mediums, we looked at market research from Kerns and Kantar Media. This research was conducted for hospitals and did not give us any relevant information. At this point, we realized we were dealing with a small "niche" group and changed strategies. To find mediums, we found associations for healthcare. We went through each organization that did not cater to executives and excluded them. We also excluded organizations that did not contact their members regularly.

When researching the best times to contact the executives, we again ran into the same issues. Instead, we have included numbers for executives as a whole.

Hobbies vary widely from person to person. We did find some lists that talked about hobbies of New Yorker City dwellers, and Silicon Valley executives. We also included a list for doctors, as it is the closest to healthcare executives that is published.


Part
03
of four
Part
03

Automotive Leadership Media Consumption Profile

While there is a lack of survey data specific to automobile industry executives and senior management’s consumption of online media, there have been several surveys of the C-suite’s media consumption in general which provide some excellent insights. While this means that we also lack insight into the specific publications auto execs most read for general or IT (including AI/machine learning) news, we have identified five of the top industry insider news sources as Automotive News, DrivingSales, the National Automobile Dealers Association, CBT Automotive Network, and AutoDealer Today.

EXECUTIVES AND MEDIA CONSUMPTION

For reasons that will be explained in our research strategy below, there is little data specific to the media consumption of executives specifically in the automotive industry. However, there is a wealth of data available on executives more generally, which we have provided below:

  • Mobile news consumption in North America among executives grew from a little over 40% in 2014 to nearly 60% in 2017.
  • 91% of executives are "are unlikely to return to a website if they find the ad experience to be obtrusive" or delay loading times.

The data formats most likely to draw an executive to content are, in order:
  • Data visualizations (66%)
  • Photography (52%)
  • Charts (42%)
  • Interviews (34%)
  • Interactive features (33%)
  • Videos (33%)
  • Maps (27%)
In terms of when they consume news:
  • When they wake up (79%), at which time 50% read email newsletters.
  • Morning commute (45%), during which 37% listen to the radio and 21% listen to podcasts.
  • Arrive at office (41%), when 35% read news websites.
  • During the workday (54%), during which 25% use news apps and 29% read email newsletters.
  • Evening commute (39%), during which radio and podcasts spike again and 17% check social media.
  • Nighttime (64%), during which 37% check social media and 38% watch TV.
  • Weekend (100%), during which they consume media through a mix of the above sources.

When waking up and consuming news:
  • 37% read a news website, up from just 13% in 2014
  • 37% view a news app, up from just 17% in 2014
  • 31% go to social media, up from 12% in 2014
  • 25% read a news content aggregator, up from just 9% in 2014
  • 50% read email newsletters, up from 42% in 2014
  • While the internet is increasingly the source of choice for executives, 81% still read magazines, with the average person in a C-list role reading 8.2 titles.
  • 84% will print out articles to read off-line, which is more than will read content on their PC (75%), tablet (70%), or smartphone (59%).
  • Likewise, while a greater number (39%) consume general news online, nearly as many (32%) prefer to consume it offline through traditional sources.
  • Those seeking information in management journals generally prefer to read them offline (37%) than online (26%).
  • Similarly, only 30% "visited a business/investment website in the last month."
  • Interestingly, CEOs are the most likely to share "good content" with their peers (48%) compared to other C-level employees (39%).
  • The most commonly shared content is long-form articles (64%), followed by short articles (58%), charts and data (33%), breaking news (28%), images (24%) and videos (19%).
  • Over the last four years, Twitter (-20% sharing) and LinkedIn (-11%) have become less popular channels to share content, with messenger apps (+30%) and even in-person contact (+10%) surging ahead.
  • 70% of purchase journeys are launched by the executive conducting their own online searches rather than by recommendations.

AUTOMOTIVE EXECUTIVE DIGITAL READING HABITS

For reasons that will be explained in our research strategy below, we are unable to determine which online news sources automotive executives and senior management prefer to obtain information on either AI advances or general news and suspect that their reading habits in this regard would be similar to the general public. Therefore, we have included the top five auto news sites specifically designed for the needs of industry insiders. Due to Used Car News both being a niche publication and the site being down at the time of our research, we did not include this site in the top 5.
Automotive News (aka Auto News) describes its mission as becoming “the primary source of industry news, data and understanding for the industry's decision-makers interested in North America.” In addition to the articles on the main site, the publication offers daily or weekly email newsletters along with email alerts "when big news happens." In addition, the site offers a separate subscription to access its “Data Center,” which offers both raw data tables and a built-in analytics engine.
As the name implies, DrivingSales is focused primarily on automotive sales; specifically, it claims to be "the auto industry’s largest employee network." Even so, the site offers its members an analytics engine with "real-time industry benchmarking," professional training, a member forum, and a blog which keeps members abreast of relevant news.
Like DrivingSales, NADA is more an industry association than a news site per se. However, it provides news items through its blog, a news media page (including its own press releases), and industry analysis including "state-by-state retail data" in real time.
CBT is more on news, and includes several of its own video shows in addition to articles and op-ed pieces which can also be seen in their daily eNewsletters and monthly print magazine. Topics covered range from association news to customer experience, the economy, and auto-related entrepreneurship.
Billed as "your daily operations magazine," AutoDealer Today provides online news articles and whitepapers in addition to both digital and print subscriptions to their monthly magazine. Topics covered include dealer and fixed operations, digital, compliance, and opinion pieces. The site also offers dealer training in the form of articles and summits.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

We initially searched for studies, surveys, and articles which might provide insights into senior management and/or C-suite media consumption habits specifically in the automotive industry. (Note: For simplicity's sake, we will simply describe this group as "execs" or "executives" going forward.) However, while we found some anecdotal data which we have used to bring additional insight into the executives of this particular industry, we found little direct data which would translate easily into bullet points. However, we did find some research into the media consumption habits of C-suite employees in general.

Many of our data points were derived from the Quartz 2018 "Global Executive Study." While this provides information not exclusive to the US, the growth of mobile news consumption and purchase journey ease and duration, which are segmented by region (e.g., North America, EMEA, APAC, and LATAM), suggests that there are broad similarities between the execs in these regions. This, in addition to a comparison of the number of female executives by region, indicates that Quartz found broad similarities across regions except where they indicate otherwise. We will, therefore, include their insights as being true for the US unless we find a reason (e.g., through another source) to believe otherwise.
Identifying the top automotive management sites likely to be read by automotive executives was relatively easy. The corporate law firm Simpson, McMahan, Glick & Burford, PLLC, issued awards to the "Top 23 Automotive News Sources (For Industry Insiders) in 2017. We compared this list against Alexa's website ratings and found it to largely correspond to the popularity of the sites given. Where we did see deviations, they appeared to be due to the broader appeal of the publication in question; e.g., Autoweek is only in the 21st place in the award list despite being one of the most popular automotive publications, but this is likely due to it being written more for the general public than for industry insiders, even if it is useful to the latter.

Identifying which digital publications or channels automotive executives, or executives in general, look to for general news and AI/machine learning news proved more difficult. The available surveys on executive media consumption from research firms like Quartz and Ipsos provide a large amount of data on what kinds of media executives consume, but none on their favorite channels.
Likewise, sites which track web traffic, like Alexa and SimilarWeb, are unable to provide demographic information about site visitors beyond, perhaps, broad geographic trends.

Likewise, none of the “top” sources for industry insiders seemed to focus on cutting-edge computer technology of any sort, let alone AI and machine learning. We conducted a series of searches in the top three entries and found no articles which directly dealt with how advances in AI would change the automotive industry save for one article on the NADA site, “#Realtalk About Artificial Intelligence,” which was hidden behind a paywall. The lack of attention to AI in the top industry insider news sources suggests that the automotive industry does not expect to be severely impacted by this new technology — or at least doesn’t know what that impact might be. This theory is bolstered by a recent Forbes article lamenting the industry’s “surprisingly slow uptake” regarding AI. Ergo, those execs who are looking for news in this area are most likely reading the same sources as the general public, though we cannot prove this from the available public data.

As a last-ditch effort, we conducted a broad-based search of popular news sites ranging from Forbes to US News & World Report to Business Insider, seeking polls and/or interviews with automotive executives or upper managers in which their news intake preferences might have emerged anecdotally, if not as hard data. This likewise did not provide any data, or even viable leads.
We hypothesize that no one has yet achieved the necessary level of granularity in a survey of executives, let alone automotive executives. We further hypothesize that executives’ general news habits would be similar to the general population, but were unable to substantiate this from the available data. Therefore, in lieu of generalized and AI news sources, we have provided five automotive insider sites.

Part
04
of four
Part
04

Healthcare Leadership Media Consumption Profile

Though there is little data on the media consumption habits of healthcare executives and senior management specifically, we have pulled together the available data about executives in general to provide key insights into their preferences. In addition, while data is scarce on executives’ preferred general news sources, we have identified five key publications in the healthcare management and AI domain: Becker’s Hospital Review, HealthLeaders Media, Modern Healthcare, Healthcare IT News, and Healthcare Innovation.

EXECUTIVES AND MEDIA CONSUMPTION

For reasons that will be explained in our research strategy below, there is little data specific to the media consumption of executives specifically in the healthcare industry. However, there is a wealth of data available on executives more generally, which we have provided below:
  • Mobile news consumption in North America among executives grew from a little over 40% in 2014 to nearly 60% in 2017.
  • 91% of executives are "are unlikely to return to a website if they find the ad experience to be obtrusive" or delay loading times.
The data formats most likely to draw an executive to content are, in order:
  • Data visualizations (66%)
  • Photography (52%)
  • Charts (42%)
  • Interviews (34%)
  • Interactive features (33%)
  • Videos (33%)
  • Maps (27%)
In terms of when they consume news:
  • When they wake up (79%), at which time 50% read email newsletters.
  • Morning commute (45%), during which 37% listen to the radio and 21% listen to podcasts.
  • Arrive at office (41%), when 35% read news websites.
  • During the workday (54%), during which 25% use news apps and 29% read email newsletters.
  • Evening commute (39%), during which radio and podcasts spike again and 17% check social media.
  • Nighttime (64%), during which 37% check social media and 38% watch TV.
  • Weekend (100%), during which they consume media through a mix of the above sources.
When waking up and consuming news:
  • 37% read a news website, up from just 13% in 2014
  • 37% view a news app, up from just 17% in 2014
  • 31% go to social media, up from 12% in 2014
  • 25% read a news content aggregator, up from just 9% in 2014
  • 50% read email newsletters, up from 42% in 2014
  • While the internet is increasingly the source of choice for executives, 81% still read magazines, with the average person in a C-list role reading 8.2 titles.
  • 84% will print out articles to read off-line, which is more than will read content on their PC (75%), tablet (70%), or smartphone (59%).
  • Likewise, while a greater number (39%) consume general news online, nearly as many (32%) prefer to consume it offline through traditional sources.
  • Those seeking information in management journals generally prefer to read them offline (37%) than online (26%).
  • Similarly, only 30% "visited a business/investment website in the last month."
  • Interestingly, CEOs are the most likely to share "good content" with their peers (48%) compared to other C-level employees (39%).
  • The most commonly shared content is long-form articles (64%), followed by short articles (58%), charts and data (33%), breaking news (28%), images (24%) and videos (19%).
  • Over the last four years, Twitter (-20% sharing) and LinkedIn (-11%) have become less popular channels to share content, with messenger apps (+30%) and even in-person contact (+10%) surging ahead.
  • 70% of purchase journeys are launched by the executive conducting their own online searches rather than by recommendations.

HEALTHCARE EXECUTIVE DIGITAL READING HABITS

Note: For reasons explained under our research strategy below, we are unable to provide information about which provide which online general news publications are read by healthcare executives, or C-suite and/or senior managers more generally. We have therefore provided three healthcare management news sources and two IT sources specific to the industry which provide strong AI/machine learning sections.

Providing its news in print, newsletter, and online formats, Becker’s Hospital Review hits all the preferred executive channels, resulting in 1.8 million monthly visitors. In addition to providing news on a wide range of topics from Legal & Regulatory to Facilities Management, Becker’s also provides articles on specific medical specialties, e.g., Orthopedics.

HealthLeaders is a division of Simplify Compliance, a self-described "multi-platform media company dedicated to meeting the business information needs of healthcare executives and professionals." They can be read in print, in briefs, a "Weekly Wrap," and any or all of six weekly email newsletters. HealthLeaders provides news and analysis on many topics important to healthcare executives, including Strategy, Finance, Innovation, Clinical Care, and Nursing.

Modern Healthcare, "the leader in healthcare business news, analysis, research & data," has news tagged for providers, but also caters to matters pertaining to insurance, politics & policy, and "people," suggesting that they wish to reach more than just the healthcare C-suite, though they emphasize their audience of execs. They publish through a combination of a "weekly print magazine, websites, e-newsletters, mobile products and events." They also provide a premium subscriber service which includes access to their several databases, white papers, and surveys.

In addition to issues pertaining to AI and machine learning, Healthcare IT News regularly publishes articles on cloud computing, telehealth, precision medicine, patient engagement, and even population health issues. They claim over 54,000 readers of their print magazine and about 181,000 monthly site visitors. The company is part of HIMSS Media, "the fastest growing B2B media group focused exclusively on healthcare and technology markets."

With a similar range of topics to Healthcare IT News, Healthcare Innovation is the result of a merger of Healthcare Informatics, Health Management Technology, and the Health IT Summits, which gives it a pedigree going back to 1980. In addition to the magazine’s “comprehensive website,” they also offer bi-monthly print and digital publications and a daily e-newsletter.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

We initially searched for studies, surveys, and articles which might provide insights into senior management and/or C-suite media consumption habits specifically in the healthcare industry. (Note: For simplicity's sake, we will simply describe this group as "execs" or "executives" going forward.) However, while we found some anecdotal data which we have used to bring additional insight into the executives of this particular industry, we found little direct data which would translate easily into bullet points. However, we did find some research into the media consumption habits of C-suite employees in general. To avoid confusion, we have organized these data points in their own section above, followed by our insights into the healthcare industry specifically. The latter insights are partially direct data and partially extrapolated, and so we will explain our extrapolations and logic as we go.
Many of our data points were derived from the Quartz 2018 "Global Executive Study." While this provides information not exclusive to the US, the growth of mobile news consumption and purchase journey ease and duration, which are segmented by region (e.g., North America, EMEA, APAC, and LATAM), suggests that there are broad similarities between the execs in these regions. This, in addition to a comparison of the number of female executives by region, indicates that Quartz found broad similarities across regions except where they indicate otherwise. We will, therefore, include their insights as being true for the US unless we find a reason (e.g., through another source) to believe otherwise.

Identifying the top healthcare management sites likely to be read by healthcare executives was relatively easy. After locating some sample publications, we used Alexa's site data to determine which publications in the same domain, healthcare business management, are in the same area. Due to the specialization of these sites, we understand to be targeted directly at healthcare executives and other high-level employees. This makes it easy to identify the top two using Alexa's site information database. We also found an IT site specific to healthcare which is nearly as popular as our top to healthcare news sites, and in the absence of other data (see below) have detailed it as a digital publication likely to be popular with healthcare execs.
Identifying which digital publications or channels healthcare executives, or executives in general, look to for general news and AI/machine learning news proved more difficult. The available surveys on executive media consumption from research firms like Quartz and Ipsos provide a large amount of data on what kinds of media executives consume, but none on their favorite channels. Likewise, sites which track web traffic, like Alexa and SimilarWeb, are unable to provide demographic information about site visitors beyond, perhaps, broad geographic trends.
We, therefore, studied our existing healthcare exec news sites to see if they had any additional information on where such execs might seek information online. Unfortunately, the available material proved to provide the inverse — that is, advice to healthcare managers on how to draw traffic to their own sites.
As a last-ditch effort, we conducted a broad-based search of popular news sites ranging from Forbes to US News & World Report to Business Insider, seeking polls and/or interviews with healthcare executives or upper managers in which their news intake preferences might have emerged anecdotally, if not as hard data. This likewise did not provide any data, or even viable leads.
We hypothesize that no one has yet achieved the necessary level of granularity in a survey of executives, let alone healthcare executives. We further hypothesize that executives’ general news habits would be similar to the general population, but were unable to substantiate this from the available data. Therefore, in lieu of generalized news sources, we have provided three healthcare management sites and two healthcare IT sites which contain strong reporting on AI advances.
Sources
Sources

From Part 01
Quotes
  • "In 2018, only 16 women (8%) were executives in the top 20 motor vehicles and parts companies in the Fortune Global 500. This is a small change from 14 women (7%) in 2014."
  • "Over half of the top 20 companies in this industry have zero women on their executive teams."
  • "Over half (56%) of C-suite leaders in the global automotive industry point to women as a critical pool of underutilized talent."
From Part 02
Quotes
  • "Despite the fact that female consumers make 80% of buying and usage decisions in healthcare, women are conspicuously absent in healthcare C-suites, making up roughly 30% of senior leadership positions and a dismal 13% of CEOs."
Quotes
  • "CEOs are the oldest and longest-tenured individuals compared with other prominent C-suite roles."
  • "When analyzed in the aggregate, the average age for a C-suite member is 54 and the average tenure is 5.3 years. However, the numbers vary depending on title and industry."
  • "The average age for a CEO across industries is 58, with the oldest average CEO age 60 in financial services and the youngest 55 in the technology sector."
  • "The CIO is on average the youngest in the C-suite at age 51, with the youngest average CIO age in the consumer industry at 47, and the oldest in industrials at 54."
Quotes
  • "Medical and health services managers Total: 639 Percentages: Women 72.0, White 80.9, African American 11.5, Asian5.0, Hispanic 9 "
Quotes
  • "Reach 40,000+ top decision makers in healthcare management #1 Health care management magazine, second most receivers, readers and exposure. Professional associations reach 94% of healthcare CEOs and are an important source of information. "
Quotes
  • "AHCAP is the premier organization for administrative professionals who support our nation’s healthcare leaders. HCAP is a not-for-profit healthcare organization dedicated to executive assistants, administrative assistants, and other professionals who support our nation’s healthcare leaders. By supporting healthcare leaders, we support the industry - and strive to enhance the healthcare experience on every level. We are proud to be the only national organization dedicated exclusively to administrative excellence in healthcare. We are proud to be the only national organization dedicated exclusively to administrative excellence in healthcare. "
  • "AHCAP represents more than 330 administrative professionals across the United States. The majority of our members support ‘C-level’ executives in healthcare facilities and health systems, particularly acute care hospitals. Our members are trusted supporters, planners and advisors to individual healthcare executives and the boards to which they report "
  • "The Journal, published electronically quarterly in February, May, August and November is the primary source of information for individuals in the field of patient financial services. The Journal articles and departments focus on current issues and topics that have an impact on the role of the patient administrative and billing professional. The Journal is emailed and archived, current circulation of approximately 5,000."
Quotes
  • "The AAHAM.org web site averages 36,000 "hits" and 5,400 "user sessions" per month. Over half of the 5,400 "user sessions" are from "unique users" and the average user session lasts 8.5 minutes."
Quotes
  • "The American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management (AAHAM) was founded in 1968 as the American Guild of Patient Account Management (AGPAM), as a national membership association for healthcare administrative management professionals. Over the years, AAHAM has evolved into a prominent organization in the healthcare arena, with its members playing a vital role in shaping the nation’s healthcare administrative system."
Quotes
  • "ACHCA offers digital marketing on the home page of its website. Place your services or products top-of-mind for key decision makers when you choose from a 6 or 12-month advertising period."
  • "Connecting with leaders in aging services settings is vital to your business success. Creating relationships with decision makers and influencers is enhanced by becoming part of the ACHCA Community. Invest with us, and you will build brand awareness, gather valuable information from your contacts, showcase your product or service, and identify target markets across the long-term and post-acute care spectrum."
Quotes
  • "2442 individual members, 1365 professional members, Top five titles: Administrator, executive director, CEO, President, Vice President"
Quotes
  • "In other words, the only way to get doctors to pay attention to you – let alone respond – is to provide them with a very compelling value proposition, prove why they should choose you, and then give them an incentive to act now"
  • "The offer could be some kind of discount, a free white paper, e-newsletter subscription, seminar, or even something doctors or staff can use personally. Spend whatever time is required to develop strong offers – your success depends upon it."
Quotes
  • "Tuesdays and Thursdays are a blessing If you’re trying to reach business executives, Tuesdays and Thursdays are usually seen as the best response days in a week. This is what marketers say to be the best days for B2B emailing. "
  • "Don’t forget about Mondays. Although everybody is very busy on a Monday, the response rates are over 45% at the start of the week because people do respond to emails on Mondays."
  • "After a study conducted on over billions of email addresses, the results showed the best time to send your emails out is just at around 10 AM. That’s when most emails are opened anyways, so the chances of yours being opened grow dramatically. If you don’t have a good reason for doing so, avoid sending your email before this hour of the morning. Never send emails at 3 or 4 AM, as those will just look weird in the receiver’s Inbox."
Quotes
  • "There is a ton of data from various studies trying to do just that. The problem is, some of these studies are in agreement, while others are completely contradictory. Trying to make sense of it all can be extremely difficult and frustrating, especially when the parameters used by each study are totally different!"
  • "The reality is, yes, you will have to experiment with your send times to hone in on the exact best times for your own list. Every email list is made up of a different set of people with different habits. Therefore, your best send time may or may not be the same as another email marketer’s best send time."
  • "According to this graph, which includes all the compiled data from several billion email addresses, the best day of the week to send emails is on Thursday, but only by a small margin. There was actually very little difference between any of the weekdays, Monday through Friday. "
Quotes
  • "Book clubs and bookbinding Knitting Jam making Photography Yoga and meditation Writing "
Quotes
  • "Book club, Segway polo, musical instruments, beekeeping, baking, magic, and boating."
Quotes
  • "Woodcarving, painting, calligraphy, star-gazing, birding"