Vodka & Brandy Demographics

Part
01
of two
Part
01

Vodka Demographics

Although direct demographics for U.S. vodka drinkers was not available, indirect data suggests that the average vodka consumer in the U.S. is a white millennial female who earns upwards of $250,000 per year, has graduated from college, lives in the Mid-South region, and is employed full time. A further breakdown of the demographics is below.

GENDER

  • According to a 2017 Harris Poll, 38% of women prefer liquor over other types of alcoholic beverages and prefer vodka compared to just 19% of men.
  • This indicates that vodka drinkers are primarily female.
  • A People Pattern Report verifies this with its findings that 51% of vodka mentions on Twitter came from females compared to 49% that came from males.

AGE

  • Statista notes that 64.8% of survey respondents between the ages of 30 and 49 drank vodka in the preceding three months, compared to 60.68% of respondents between the ages of 18 and 29 and 59.89% of respondents between the ages of 50 and 64.
  • A BreakThru Beverage Group study found that 70% of millennials (ages 23-38) consumed vodka at least once in the last 12 months, the highest percentage of any alcohol for that age group.
  • In 2015, a People Pattern report showed that 90% of vodka mentions on Twitter came from the age group of 25-34 years old and 8% came from ages 34-44 years old.

RACE

  • Based on a 2015 People Pattern Report, 75% of vodka mentions on Twitter were from white consumers.
  • Black consumers constituted 18% of vodka mentions on Twitter.

INCOME

EDUCATION

  • Although not strictly for vodka, TABS Analytics found that 40% of people with college degrees purchase liquor (excluding beer and wine).
  • Moreover, 39% of people with advanced college degrees (post-grad) purchase liquor.
  • Of people with some college, 34% purchase liquor.

LOCATION

  • Based on the TABS Analytics report, the consumption of liquor does not vary across major U.S. regions, with 35% of consumers in the Northeast, Central, South, and West regions purchasing liquor.
  • However, when divided into smaller regions, the Mid-South region has the highest percentage of liquor purchasers at 41%, followed by the Mountain region at 37%; and the Mid-Atlantic, Great Lakes, and West South Central regions at 36% each.
  • Pennsylvania, Michigan, and New Jersey have the highest percentage of liquor consumers at 40% each, followed by Texas at 38% and Ohio at 37%.

EMPLOYMENT STATUS

  • According to the 2017 Wine Market Council Wine Consumer Segmentation report, 37% of occasional wine drinkers and 45% of high frequency wine drinkers also drink beer and spirits, and another 18% of occasional wine drinkers and 19% of high frequency wine drinkers drink both wine and spirits, but not beer.
  • As such, we can say that 55% of occasional wine consumers and 64% of high frequency wine drinkers share demographics in common with spirit drinkers.
  • The Wine Market Council shows that 47% of occasional wine drinkers are employed full time, compared to 25% who are retired, 8% who work part-time, 7% who are self-employed, 7% who are homemakers, 4% who are not employed, and 2% who are students.
  • Moreover, 43% of high frequency wine drinkers are employed full time, compared to 31% who are retired, 8% who work part-time, 9% who are self-employed, 5% who are homemakers, 3% who are not employed, and 2% who are students.
  • While it is likely not quite equal, we can assume that based on the crossover between wine and spirits drinkers, vodka consumers are similarly employed.

RESEARCH STRATEGY

To begin our search for vodka drinker demographics in the U.S., we looked for formal research reports from sources such as the Harris Poll, Nielsen, Pew Research, Statista, and others. This was mildly successful in that it helped us identify the top generation of vodka drinkers, which is the millennial generation and the predominant gender of vodka drinkers, which is female. However, no other demographics were disaggregated in these reports.

Therefore, we turned to industry reports from sources such as BreakThru Beverage, Spirited Magazine, the Drinks Business, Beverage Dynamics, The Beverage Journal, and others. We were able to confirm the age of vodka drinkers, but there were no other demographics provided. This is likely because millennials are a target demographic for most spirit brands and as such, they are mainly concerned with the age of their consumers rather than other demographics.

We then expanded our time frame to 2016 and repeated the first two strategies. We found similar data on millennials and gender, but there was nothing on the more obscure demographics. We expanded the time frame again to 2015, which is when we located the People Pattern Alcohol Report that analyzed Twitter posts for mentions of various spirit types, including vodka. This allowed us to obtain more information on age and gender, and new findings on race.

In an attempt to find the missing data points of education, income, and employment, we expanded our search to include spirits and liquor, which would encompass vodka. Since we discovered that vodka outsells all other types of spirit, we assumed that most demographics would directly apply to vodka consumers. We were able to find a report from TABS Analytics that provided liquor demographics for income and level of education. This data was included as helpful findings.

The only data point we were unable to locate for either vodka or spirits was employment status. However, we did uncover a report from the Wine Market Council that provided the employment statistics for wine drinkers. In that report, we learned that there is significant crossover between wine drinkers and spirits drinkers. Therefore, we used the wine drinker employment statistics as a proxy for spirit drinkers, and therefore, for vodka drinkers. While there is likely some discrepancies between the groups, this is the best data currently available and was provided as helpful findings.
Part
02
of two
Part
02

Brandy Demographics

Brandy consumers in the United States are distributed over an entire spectrum of ages. The ages of 30 – 49 years consume the most brandy among various age groups. The Statista sources are provided in a separate document.

Demographics of Brandy Consumers in the United States

1. AGE
  • 21.36% of 18 — 29-year-olds consume brandy in the US.
  • 22.7% of 30 — 49-year-olds consume brandy in the US.
  • 11.3% of 50 — 64-year-olds consume brandy in the US.
2. LOCATION
  • People from the states of California, New York, Wisconsin, Illinois, and Minnesota consume the most amount of brandy in the US, consuming 2,538,600, 850,800, 848,400, 707,200, and 697,630 of 9-liter cases of brandy in 2017, respectively.
  • People from the states of Vermont, Wyoming, Maine, Alaska, and Idaho consume the least amount of brandy in the US, consuming 5,160, 6,840, 10,540, 12, 600, and 13,590 of 9-litre cases of brandy in 2017, respectively.
  • District of Columbia, Wisconsin, Minnesota, New Hampshire, and Maryland have the maximum per capita brandy consumption in the US, consuming 231.8, 199.3, 170.5, 136.9, and 124.9 of 9-liter cases of brandy in 2017, respectively. (Source3)
  • Utah, Vermont, Idaho, Maine, and West Virginia have the minimum per capita brandy consumption in the US, consuming 7.9, 10.9, 11.1, 11.2, and 12.8 of 9-liter cases of brandy in 2017, respectively.
3. INCOME

RESEARCH STRATEGY

After thorough research, the research team could not find the gender/sex, educational level, and race demographics of brandy consumers in the US. We explored reputable statistics websites like Statista, US Bureau of Economic Analysis, the Balance, and ResearchGate. We found the age, income, and location demographics, but the other demographics weren't found on these websites.

Next, we scoured news and media websites to seek any mention of the demographic breakdown of brandy drinkers, or any recent trend in brandy consumption in the US. After searching through news websites such as Financial Times, Business Insider, Thompson Reuters, and the Economic Times, we found many articles on rising brandy market, but they were not related to demographics in any way.

We also explored market research websites such as Orbis Research, MarketandMarket, and IBISWorld to find studies related to demographics related to brandy consumption in the US. We couldn't find any demographic data related to brandy consumers in the US, even though we did find many research reports on market size and market growth of the brandy industry in the USA and on a global scale.

Also, we looked at top brandy manufacturers websites and tried to find any information, data points, or surveys conducted by them, which could assess demographic data of brandy consumers in the US. We explored the websites of Hennessey, Remy Martin, Martell, Dreher, E & J Galio, and Salignac. However, we couldn't find any demographic data nor any study that could reveal the same.

After all our search strategies failed to uncover demographic data other than age, income, and region, we expanded the scope to North America and then to the Atlantic region. This research could still not provide us with any useful data. We found the global market size and market growth, as well as news reports on rising brandy markets, but no information on demographics was available. In the end, we concluded that demographic data concerned with gender, sex, race, and educational background was either not publicly available or not yet studied.
Sources
Sources