At-Home Testing: Most Influential Individuals

Part
01
of two
Part
01

At-Home Testing: Most Influential Individuals (1)

This research on some reputable or influential individuals for at-home medical testing and the articles they have written on the subject matter, produced 5 individuals who have at some point in their career, written articles regarding the subject. The findings include Kyle Wiggers, who had written two articles relating to at-home medical testing. Others are Julian Franz, Antonio Regalado, Dorothy Pomerantz, and Noelle Ike, who have all written at least one article for at-home medical testing.

SOME INFLUENTIAL AT-HOME TESTING INDIVIDUALS

Kyle Wiggers

Julia Franz

Antonio Regalado

Dorothy Pomerantz

Noelle Ike

RESEARCH STRATEGY

Our team collected information from relevant sources to determine five influential or reputable individuals for at-home medical testing. Though several individuals have written articles on the at-home medical testing field, there were no predefined lists to establish those that are of a major influence.

We first pulled up several articles concerning at-home medical testing on several news websites like CNN, to establish some reputable or influential writers in the space. We were only able to arrive at some writers already mentioned in the previous research. As this was the first step, we went on to check sources from medical journals with the intent of obtaining articles written by experts or people of influence in the at-home medical testing field, but could not find any that would be of relevance to our research. Still attempting to come up with a list, we searched the articles provided in the journals relating to at-home medical testing but this attempt yielded no related articles.

Secondly, we shifted our approach to work with articles that were discovered via general searches through relevant sources and populated the workspace with our findings for individuals who have at least written an article on the subject matter. To determine the location, experience, and influence of each writer, we pulled their social media handles like LinkedIn. This turned out to be a valuable source for their influence, as we utilized the available data for their followership of 500+ connections to determine their influence level. With this, it was also possible to establish their experience level and location. The only writer on the list with a slightly lower connection was Julia Franz.

Lastly, on obtaining at least two articles for each individual discovered in our findings, we executed searches using the names to the write-ups on related articles specifically titled at-home medical testing. This was done through a general search via relevant sources which provided us with one successful find on Kyle Wiggers, who had written an extra article for at-home medical testing. We discovered that the other individuals provided in our findings had one article each. After an exhaustive search, we were unable to find any further articles written by the writers addressing the topic, at-home medical testing.

Part
02
of two
Part
02

At-Home Testing: Most Influential Individuals (2)

Five reputable individuals in at-home medical testing are Scott Weissman, Ken Wysocki, Ann Gronowski, Gustavo Glusman and Megan Allyse.

Scott Weissman

  • Scott M Weissman is located in Chicago, Illinois. The company he founded, Chicago Genetics Consultants, has 294 followers on Facebook and 1,453 followers on Twitter.
  • He graduated from the University of Illinois in 1998 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and from Northwestern University with a Master of Science degree in Genetic Counseling in 2002. He is certified by the American Board of Genetic Counseling and is licensed as a genetic counselor in Illinois.
  • Scott Weissman has written articles for Genetics in Medicine, Cancer, Journal of the American Medical Association, and the Journal of Genetic Counseling.
  • Mr Weissman is the lead author for the article titled: At-home genetic testing in pediatrics. This article was published on August 22nd 2019 in the journal Current Opinion in Pediatrics.
  • The article reviewed at-home genetic testing for children, addressed associated challenges, and provided guidance for its use to pediatricians and other health care professionals.
  • Mr. Weissman also co-authored the article titled: The dawn of consumer-directed testing. This article was published in the American Journal of Medical Genetics in March 2018.
  • The article was a review of the direct-to-consumer genetic testing/consumer-directed genetic testing market and the issues and opportunities that arise for the genetic counseling profession.

Ken Wysocki

  • Ken Wysocki is located in Tempe, Arizona. He has over 500 connections on LinkedIn.
  • Mr. Wysocki graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee with a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing in 1997. He has a Master of Science degree in Community Health from Arizona State University and a Postgraduate Doctoral degree from the University of Arizona. He has been a member of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners since 2002.
  • Mr. Wysocki is the lead author for the article titled: Direct to consumer versus clinical genetic testing. The article was published in the Journal of American Association of Nurse Practitioners in March 2019.
  • The article highlighted items to consider when using a direct-to-consumer genetic tests.
  • Mr. Wysocki is a co-author for the article titled: Should patients order their own genomic testing? This article was published in the Journal for Nurse Practitioners in July-August 2016.
  • The article considered the potential pros and cons of direct-to-consumer home genetic testing.

Ann Gronowski

  • Ann Gronowski is located in St. Louis, Missouri.
  • Dr. Gronowski received her Bachelor's degree in Animal Science from the University of Illinois in 1985. She graduated from Iowa State University with a Master of Science degree in Nutrition in 1988 and from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a Doctor of Philosophy in Endocrinology and Reproductive Physiology in 1992. She is a member of the American Board of Clinical Chemistry and surveyed the customer experience in direct-to-consumer laboratory testing in 2017.
  • Dr. Gronowski was the lead author for the article titled: Improving direct-to-consumer medical testing. This was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on October 24th 2017.
  • This article discussed five ways to improve direct-to-consumer medical testing.
  • An interview with Dr Gronowski was published in the Medical Press for the Washington Universty School of Medicine on April 22, 2019.
  • The interview discussed some flaws in home medical tests discovered by Dr. Gronowski.

Gustavo Glusman

  • Mr. Glusman is located in Seattle, Washington. He has 317 connections on LinkedIn.
  • He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Biology at the Israel Institute of Technology and his Master of Science degree, also in Biology, at the Weizman Institute of Science. Mr. Glusman has a Postgraduate Doctoral degree in Bio-informatics from the Weizman Institute of Science.
  • Mr. Glusman co-authored an article titled: Genotype fingerprints enable, fast and private comparison of genetic testing results for research and direct-to-consumer applications.
  • The article was published in the Genes journal in 2018 and it discussed the suitability of genotype fingerprints as a format for public use of genetic information to support ancestry searches.
  • Mr. Glusman was also listed as an author on an article titled: Crowd-sourced direct-to consumer genomic analysis of a family quartet. This article was published in the Journal BMC Genomics on 7th November 2015.
  • The article tracked the experience of a family from Spain who used direct-to-consumer tests to understand their genetic data.

Megan Allyse

  • Ms. Allyse is located in Rochester, Minnesota. She has 254 connections on LinkedIn.
  • Megan Allyse holds Bachelors degrees from Stanford University in International Relations and Communications. She has also graduated from the University of Nottingham with a Master of Art degree in Science and Society and a Postgraduate Doctorate in Sociology and Social Policy.
  • Ms. Allyse was the lead author on the article titled: Direct-to-consumer testing 2.0: Emerging models of direct-to-consumer genetic testing. This article was published in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings in January 2018.
  • The article reviewed the history of direct-to-consumer testing and discussed the regulatory implications of its use before describing the emergence of a hybrid model.
  • Dr. Allyse was interviewed for the article: Direct-to-consumer genetic testing — a rapidly shifting landscape. This article was published in the Mayo Clinic Blog on January 29th 2018.
  • In the article Dr. Allyse discussed strategies to align medical practice and the interests of the consumer in direct-to-consumer medical testing.

Research Strategy

To determine five additional reputable and/or influential individuals for at-home medical testing, our team collected information from a number of sources.

We began the search for a pre-compiled list with industry trade journals such as Medical Laboratory Observer, Lab Tests Online, and the Clinical Laboratory Science Journal. Unfortunately, these sources did not yield a list of individuals. Next, the team expanded the search to the databases of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the American Medical Association, the Office of the Surgeon General, and the US Food and Drug Administration. Once again, the search provided useful articles but no listing of influential individuals for this area of medical testing. The search was then expanded to a general search of all academic journals such as Science Direct and Elsevier, however the team failed to find any pre-compiled lists to reference for this request.

While the team did not find any pre-compiled listings of influential individuals in at-home medical testing, the search yielded numerous articles on the subject which was used as a resource to determine frequent authors of articles on direct-to-consumer medical testing. This approach yielded the necessary information to compile the list above.
Sources
Sources

From Part 02