Husqvarna

Part
01
of eleven
Part
01

US Pro-Grade Experts: Media Habits

Smartphone and digital voice assistant usage among early adopters aged 30-45 are the highest in the general population. The target segment can be reached via websites such as TechCrunch, Engadget, Techmeme, The Verge, Gizmodo, Forbes, and Kotaku. NPR is the most popular technology podcast among this group.

Smartphones, Voice Assistants, and Social Media

  • The age group 30-45 comprises millennials (24-38 yrs.) and Gen Xers (39-54 yrs.).
  • Deloitte classifies digital media consumers into five types: Mobile-first Viewers (18%), Power Streamers (18%), Highly Subscribed (21%), Hybrid Adopters (18%), and Linear TV Consumers (25%).
  • Millennials and GenXers make up 77% (43%+34%) of Mobile-first Viewers, 61% (25%+36%) of Power Streamers, 49% (25%+24%) of Highly Subscribed, 57% (23%+34%) of Hybrid Adopters, and 27% (9%+18%) of Linear TV consumers.
  • Mobile-first Viewers view 30% of their movies and 25% of TV shows on their smartphones; they view 40% of their video content on TV. A study by Hearts & Science, an Omnicom Group agency, found that 47% of millennials and GenXers are "watching absolutely no content on traditional TV platforms".
  • Mobile-first Viewers stream an average of 26 hours of video every week in 2018. In 2010, "extreme techies" watched web video for 1.5 hours every week.
  • There is a greater likelihood of Millennials and Gen Xers engaging with advertisements on smartphones than any other form of media.
  • In 2013, early-adopter millennials spent "17% more time with tablets and 14% more time with their mobile phones" compared to the average millennial.
  • The Mobile-first Viewer group exhibits the highest penetration of social media, they are avid gamers, and nearly three in four (70%) use digital voice assistants (34.3% of millennials in the US use smart speakers).
  • A quarter (25%) of them planned to cut the cord within the following year. Cord-cutters "are part of a small group of early adopters".
  • Social media, digital voice assistant devices, and smartphones are the best way to reach this consumer group which comprises mainly millennials and Gen Xers. The mean income of this group is $74,400. As education and incomes are usually correlated, it is likely that this group is also well-educated.

Popular Technology Podcasts

  • NPR - TED Radio Hour, Gimlet - Reply All, BBC World Service - 13 Minutes to the Moon, Jack Rhysider - Darknet Diaries, and Recode - Recode Decode are the top five technology podcasts on itunes. The complete list of top technology podcasts on itunes can be found here.

Popular Tech News Websites

  • Techmeme, Ars Technica, TechCrunch, Engadget, and The Verge are the most popular technology news websites based on the number of social media followers. The complete list of technology news websites can be found here.

Other Websites

  • Based on a study done by Ad Age in 2010, digital adopters aged 24-45 read magazines such as The New Yorker, The Wall Street Journal, Esquire, Forbes, Fortune, and Food & Wine. NPR was popular with this segment in 2010 too.
  • Tech sites like Gizmodo, Engadget, and Tech Crunch were also popular with digital adopters (in general) in 2010.
  • Early adopters were also more likely than the average to frequent Fox Entertainment Group, IMDb, Gawker Media Networks, Hulu (streaming), and Gizmodo.

Triangulated Findings (Websites & Social Media)

  • We researched the traffic to and from tech-news websites (Tech Crunch, Gizmodo, and Techmeme) popular with early adopters. The triangulated findings presented are in the global context as United States-specific website analysis on SimilarWeb requires payment. However, the top-referring or outgoing websites and social media platforms are either US-based, or popular in the US, or among the aforementioned websites popular with early adopters in the US.

Tech Crunch

  • Nearly half (44.83%) of the traffic on TechCrunch is from the United States.
  • Yahoo is the top-referring website for TechCrunch. Yahoo is also the top outgoing link destination on TechCrunch.
  • Forbes is the top website to receive paid traffic (via ads) from Tech Crunch.
  • Facebook (40.35%) and Twitter (26.99%) generated the most social media traffic for Tech Crunch.

Gizmodo

  • Over half (58.39%) of the traffic on Gizmodo is from the United States.
  • Kotaku (gaming) is the top-referring website for TechCrunch. Kotaku is also the top display advertising publisher for Gizmodo.
  • Facebook (48.78%) and Twitter (25.26%) generate the most social media traffic for Gizmodo.

Techmeme

  • Almost two-thirds (61.87%) of the traffic on Techmeme comes from the United States.
  • Forbes is the top-referring website for Techmeme. The Verge, CNBC, Bloomberg, TechCrunch, and NY Times are the top outgoing link destinations and Engadget is the top outgoing ad destination.
  • Twitter (60.55%) and YouTube (10.64%) generate the most social media traffic for Techmeme.
Part
02
of eleven
Part
02

EU Pro-Grade Experts: Media Habits

A vast majority of Europeans ages 30-45 are on social media, watch over an hour of TV daily, primarily on their smartphones. The following information presents details about the proposed group.

Media Consumption

  • Affluent Europeans in their late 30s and 40s (mean age of 42) watch 133 minutes of TV per day, on average. They spend an average of 54 minutes daily on social media and 147 minutes online, primarily on their smartphones. As of 2016, 67% owned tablets and 11% owned wearable devices.
  • On-demand content is essential for this cohort. Affluent Europeans in the 35-44 group are the European group most likely to listen to podcasts, particularly those living in Sweden, as 16% listen to it daily.
  • People in the 25-44 age group are the most prevalent French cohort on Facebook, which is the second most popular social media platform in the country, losing only to YouTube. Facebook, WhatsApp, Snapchat, Instagram, and Waze are the apps with the most significant shares of active monthly users.
  • Google, YouTube, Facebook, Amazon, eBay, T-Online, and Bild are the websites with the highest traffic coming from Germany. YouTube, WhatsApp, Facebook, and Instagram are the social media leaders, while WhatsApp, Facebook and Amazon are the apps with the largest percentage of active users.
  • As of 2018, adults aged 30 to 49 in Germany spent on average 194 minutes watching TV daily and nearly one hour watching TV on-demand.
  • Google, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia, and Aftonbladet are the top five most popular sites in Sweden. It is the only country among the three to have Reddit and Netflix in the top 10. (7th and 8th position, respectively).
  • YouTube is the most popular social media platform, followed by Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and Skype. Facebook, Spotify, Swish Payments, Instagram, and Bankid are the most popular apps.

Internet

  • Eighty percent of Europeans in the 35-44 group utilize the internet daily. Ninety-one percent of Swedes access it daily, 87% of Germans and 78% of people in France.
  • Seventy percent of Europeans participate in some form of social media. In Sweden, participation is more widespread (79%), while Germany falls a bit behind (63%). France exhibits the most significant variation, with 49% of the 35-44 cohort being part of a social network.
  • Eighty-four percent of Europeans use the internet to discover information about goods and services. A vast majority of people living in Sweden (92%) and Germany (92%) do the same, while France is nearly the same as the European average (80%).
  • Sixty percent of Europeans listen to music online (web radio or music streaming). A much higher percentage of Swedes listen to music online (87%), while people from France and Germany have below-average adoption (54% and 53%, respectively).
  • Seventy-five percent of Europeans (35-44) watch streamed TV or videos. The vast majority of the same cohort in Sweden watch stream services (93%), while Germans also beat the European average (83%). France, on the other hand, is far behind (67%).
  • Forty-three percent of Europeans (35-44) watch streamed TV (live or catch-up) from TV broadcasters. The habit is more prevalent in Sweden (79%), while people in France tend not to care for it (37%). In Germany, roughly half of the cohort watch streamed TV (52%).
  • Thirty-one percent watch on-demand videos from commercial services (35-44). Again, Sweden is at the forefront with 67%, France is behind with 20%, while Germany is near the European average, with 33%.
  • Sixty-seven percent watch video content from sharing services (35-44). In Sweden that numbers amounts to 86%, while uptake in Germany is 75% and 56% in France.

News

  • Western Europeans between ages 30-49 are mostly getting their daily news online (68%), with television following closely (61%).
  • In Germany, radio is the favorite source of news for the cohort, followed by online and TV. France is the only one of the three countries where TV is significantly ahead of online sources (62% vs. 50%).
  • In Western Europe, Sweden is the number one country for online news, with 83% of the 30-49 population getting daily news from online sources, while 58% get it from radio and 48% from TV.
  • In France, BFM, TF1, France TV, Le Monde, and Radio France are the preferred sources of news for the cohort. In Germany, ARD and Der Spiegel are the top sources, while SVT/Radio, Aftonbladet, DN, TV4, and Omni are Sweden’s favorites.
  • Fifty-five percent of those (ages 30-49) living in Sweden get news from social media at least daily, as opposed to 38% in France and 34% in Germany.

Research Strategy

To provide an overview of the media habits of the proposed demographic group, the research team relied on a mixture of demographics, income and regional data.
We commenced our research by looking for the media habits of well-educated suburban European families in the 30-45 age group. This type of profile depends on hard data that is typically found in extensive studies/surveys that ordinarily do not provide that level of granular segmentation. Therefore, we were unable to track the information with this approach.

Next, we broadened our criteria to include affluent people in the 30-45 group living in Europe. We located one publicly available study conducted by Ipsos from 2016. The company usually releases studies about affluent Europeans yearly; however, the most recent ones are behind paywalls. For that reason, we included data from 2016 but excluded information prone to be affected by the date, such as social media preferences.

Our next attempt was to approach the criteria from the generation point of view. No generation fits the 30-45 age group, but we theorized that data from affluent, urban older millennials and young Gen Xers could provide some relevant insights. Although there is information available about both groups, none of the sources with both Generations (as we needed to analyze) divided the insights by age or presented data that would allow us to estimate where the 30-45 group would fit. Given the topic and differences we found, we concluded that the age range would be too broad to be accurate.

We then explored multiple European databases, such as Eurostat, and located two datasets, one from 2015 dividing consumption habits by income and location and one from 2018 with age segmentation. We cross-referenced both reports to measure if data from the age report would be significantly affected by the income group. We discovered that income and location results in a 3% difference, indicating that if the overall population that uses social media is 50%, those in the fifth and fourth income quartile would be roughly 52% and 53%. The research team did not add any percentages to the final report to ensure accuracy, but we consider the age group a reliable substitute for the assigned demographic group.

Lastly, we expanded our research to include some minor regional insights, such as the most popular sites and apps, since the information was not publicly available for the age group. We also highlighted data from Germany, France and Sweden when available as requested.

As previously noted, media consumption habits, especially for a group as large as “Europeans” require quantitative information, which dramatically diminishes the creative strategies available.



Part
03
of eleven
Part
03

Innovative, Smart and Modern, Part 2

European millennials value smart and innovative companies that respect the environment, create authentic experiences and offer technology that is customizable and freeing.

General Millennial values

  • European millennials are more likely to ask more questions, which translates to thinking more about and researching more a product before purchasing.
  • Deloitte found that millennials worldwide are filled with more distrust than other generations. This might be why the above point, about more research, holds true.
  • As a side note, millennials in Germany favor Android and 68% continue to use their laptop.
  • Climate change and environment is millennials' (and Gen Zers') top concern. This could lead to an association with "innovative, smart and modern" with concepts or products that protect the planet.
  • Three in five European millennials agreed with technology being something that "more freedom of mobility" and modern/smart things should "allows [them] to tailor things to fit [their] own needs.
  • Some more modern, innovative things have yet to grab hold in certain parts of Europe. For example, 55% of German millennials have never tried mobile payments and 70% still pay by cash for groceries. This is in contrast to Italians who have embraced mobile payments much more fully.
  • 32% and 27%, respectively, stated that businesses should be trying to improve society and improve/protect the environment.
  • European millennials value public services, worry about poverty/inequality, but also believe that private (enterprise) competition is good.

Millennials and products

  • Millennials are much more likely to stop their relationship with a business/company for personal reasons.
  • Millennials also do not like personal intrusion in their products. 1/3 of survey respondents stated they'd lessened or stopped a relationship due to the amount of personal data requested from them.
  • Customization is extremely important for millennials purchasing patterns.
  • This demographic demands new ideas and interpretations in their products. Modern and innovative equals unique design, reflecting individuality and values.
  • Millennials view collaborations (on products) as something innovative and modern.
  • Experiences (especially, "unique, fleeting and personal") are extremely important to millennials. However, they demand experiences be and feel authentic, facilitating and enhancing what they are already doing or wanting.
  • Millennials (50%) are also more likely to think about resale value of major purchases than Gen Xers (35%).
  • Challenger brands have become an important disruptive force, as millennials no longer like brands that try to be "everything to everyone".

Research Strategy

Pre-existing information how European millennials think about the terms smart, innovative and modern was not widely available. This is quite a niche topic, and it appears that market research has not been conducted on this specific issue. Furthermore, there was not much information comparing European millennials to Gen Xers. Therefore, we dug into several sources that, in general, discussed European millennials and their thoughts, values and perceptions. We extracted relevant information and facts that could be used to discuss how European millennials viewed products or how they might define innovative/smart/modern products. Again, it was difficult to draw conclusions or analysis comparing European millennials (as opposed to American millennials, whom most research tends to be about) to the previous Generation in relation to how they might define innovative/smart/modern.
Part
04
of eleven
Part
04

US Pro Grade Experts: Psychographics

The average female in this age group is most likely a working mother that values her family. She is busy raising her family and realizes she will have to take care of her parents soon if she already isn't doing so. She loves a bargain and a good social cause. The average male in this age group is most likely a working father. He is active in his family's life, even cooking dinner.

Demographic Background Information

  • The age group of 30-45 is made up of two generations, Millennials and Generation X. Market research is usually conducted by generations instead of age groups. Therefore, we have included information for both generations.

Home/Family

  • The older end of this age group is not only taking care of mostly teenagers but their older parents. 64% of the older people in this age group feel it is their responsibility to take care of aging parents.
  • 64% of the older people in this age group feel it is their responsibility to take care of aging parents.
  • The typical person in this group is most likely married, with 86% in this age group being mothers. (2.5 children per household).
  • There is a slim chance (10-15%) that they are a grandparent, and a possibility that her grandchildren share her home.
  • The younger women in this group account for 2/3 of all first time home buyers.

Work

  • They are reaching the height of their careers.
  • Chances are that they attended some kind of college (60%)
  • Women are most likely working mothers that average at least 25 hours per week. There is a 40% chance that she is the main breadwinner for the family.
  • Their work life is relatively stable, with 87% not changing jobs in the last year.
  • According to Facebook, the job types that are reported most are administrative services (24%), management (26%), sales (19%), production (16%), healthcare (13%), and education (14%), social services (11%), and business/finance (10%).

Travel

  •  More than half plan to take a vacation within the next 12 months, with the 40-45 age group having a higher percentage than the younger people in this group.
  • They will take an average of 4.2 trips this year.

Values/Views

  • This age group prefers authenticity. They value safety and security, so be honest and upfront with them.
  • They are generally accepting of others.
  • They highly value a work/life balance.
  • The men and women of this group are most likely registered to vote (76% & 80%) and is most likely politically moderate.
  • 42% believe that having fun is the whole point of life.
  • The majority (80%) would rather spend on experiences than things.
  • Social causes are important and ways to support them are sought out.
  • 76% of women in this group would like to be part of a special panel.
  • The women in this group are ready for a female president (83%) and would have voted for Hillary Clinton (49%).

Stressors

  • 81% wish they had more time to spend with their family.
  • 56% are overwhelmed by financial burdens.
  • They feel pessimistic about retirement.

Health Attitudes

  • 52% have a positive body image.
  • 67% try to exercise their brain and their body.
  • 20% have had a "wake up call" with their health in the last three years.
  • 57% consider themselves health conscious.

Shopping Behaviors/Attitudes

  • This group is more likely to use their mobile phone over a PC/laptop when searching for products to buy online. (59% vs. 54%). 30% have used their mobile phones to pay for a purchase in the last month.
  • This group is more likely to spend on others, such as children, than themselves.
  • The oldest end of this group (45+) outspends all other generations when it comes to housing, clothing, eating out, and entertainment.
  • The older end of this group is more likely to be loyal to a brand. 60% agree that if they find a brand they like, they will stick with it.
  • More than 90% researched a brand in the last month. The top categories they researched are travel (47%), clothing/apparel (43%), electronics (40%), and food or beverages (36%).
  • The younger people in this group will spend more for a socially responsible product.
  • More than half of the women in this group feel they are on top of their spending and 62% decide how the budget is spent.

Favorite Stores

  • Some of their favorite stores are Home Depot, Pottery Barn, Banana Republic, Finish Line, Foot Locker, and H&M.

Traditional Media Viewing

  • They will actively avoid commercials.
  • They spend an average of fifteen hours per week watching television.

Free Time

  • 40% fantasize about having a day when they have absolutely nothing to do.
  • They will spend 18-20 hours a week on leisure activities.
  • The most popular things to do with their free time are go out to eat (81%), socialize with friends and family (47%), and watch movies (62%).
  • 50% say they pick hobbies that help them unwind and destress.

Hobbies

  • Making home improvements was the most popular hobby (26%). Finding the latest tech, sports, gaming, reading, dance, crafting, fitness, music, board games, and cooking are also popular hobbies for this age group.
  • Of the women in this group, 57% gardened in the last year and 55% read.

Online Behaviors

  • The most popular activities for this group are Facebook (71%), YouTube (59%), Social networking (58%), banking (55%), and playing games on their phone (19%).

Digital Devices

  • They prefer to use their smartphone (81%) or laptop (81%). Her least favorite device is desktop (48%) or an e-reader (15%).

Digital Content

  • They are avid streamers. They subscribe to Netflix (68%), Amazon Prime (49%), Hulu (40%), Spotify (35%), and Satellite Radio (32%).
  • They consume seven different types of digital content: weather (68%), news (62%), music (50%), travel (39%), sports (35%), and finance (33%).

Social Media

  • Facebook is the number one platform for this age group, and is a sure bet for a platform to reach them.
  • Over 80-99% use social media.
  • Their preferred time to access social media is between 8 PM and midnight.
  • Their motivation to use social media is goal oriented. They use social media to stay up to date with the news and keep in touch with friends and family. Their top social media activities are consuming content (71%), sharing or reposting content (42%), and creating their own content (29%).
  • Social media is used as a referral system for many when researching products.

Facebook

  • For this group, the most popular Facebook pages are Pottery Barn Kids, Jane, imomsohard, Lime Lush Boutique, Smallwoods, Bringing Home the Browns, Modern Vintage Boutique, Canvas On Demand, Ooh La Llama, and Lolly Wolly Doodle.

YouTube

  • 73% regularly watch YouTube. The top five categories are home repair and improvement, cooking, technology use and repair, arts and crafts, and beauty and personal care.
  • YouTube is popular since it lets them connect with their kids and keep up with trends that are important to their children.
  •  DIY content is one of the most popular viewing topics.

Research Strategy

To obtain a psychographic for this group, we used generational research, but focused on educated, upper middle class demographics. When using Facebook Insights, we were able to get very exact results by entering the age group, economic status, familial status, interests (tech was used along with gardening), and employment.
Part
05
of eleven
Part
05

Innovative, Smart and Modern, Part 1

Millennials act innovators and influencers with the ability to greatly influence culture differently than Generation X and Baby Boomers. This group values both ease of use and unlimited access when it comes to smart technology. Conversely, Generation X values comfort and simplicity.

How Millennials Define Innovative Products

  • Millennials are innovators and influencers with considerable influence on culture in ways that past generations could not.
  • This generation is about 2.5 times more prone to adopt technology earlier than others as they are not only drivers, but consumers as well. They desire the most recent products and are willing to replace it with a newer, more resonant product if it does not suit their taste.
  • Evolution is important to Millennials, and they are quick to move on from popular products because there is typically a superior offering by the time the product gains traction. Technology mimics the swift pace of change that Millennials seek.
  • Regarding digital trends, Millennials remain at the forefront, so they have a flair for innovation.
  • Disruption is essential to brands that want to stay ahead regarding innovation.
  • Disruption is sometimes equated with innovation, and Millennials play a key role in forcing innovation.

How Millennials Define Smart Products

How Millennials Define Modern Products

  • Millennials like their possessions but do not necessarily want the same things as their Boomer parents. Millennials want to purchase items that are "well-designed, well-functioning and well-thought-out."
  • For brands to appear modern to them, they have to provide deep value to Millennials.
  • Modern product packaging reflects the values and ideals that are important Millennials, which are sustainability, convenience, ethics, and authentic experience.

Comparison to Generation X

  • Generation X was not as innovative as the Millennial generation and as a result, they did not exert much influence on culture. They were sidelined by brands and lumped together with Boomers.
  • Generation X is not as inclined to moving with trends, which makes them different from Millennials when it comes to innovative products. However, the group is more prone to purchasing items that benefit the environment or society, similar to Millennials.
  • Generation Xers are more likely to conduct thorough research on products prior to shopping, which makes them late adopters of technology compared to Millennials when it comes to smart devices.
  • Regarding smart home technologies, Millennials prefer unlimited access and ease of use via their smartphones, while Generation X values simplicity and comfort.
  • Generation X is more loyal to brands compared to Millennials and Boomers, and therefore, they are less likely to try new brands.
  • Generation Xers grew up during a time when there was no digital advertising. Hence, they respond in equal measure to traditional and modern types of marketing.
Part
06
of eleven
Part
06

EU Pro Grade Experts: Psychographics

The average female in this age group is most likely a working mother that values her family. She is busy raising her family and realizes she will have to take care of her parents soon if she already isn't doing so. She loves a bargain and a good social cause. The average male in this age group is most likely a working father. He is active in his family's life, even cooking dinner. Europe as a whole, has a more liberal view of social issues and prefers for the government to take care of everyone that is in need.

Demographic Background Information

  • The age group of 30-45 is made up of two generations, Millennials and Generation X. Market research is usually conducted by generations instead of age groups. Therefore, we have included information for both generations.

Special Considerations For the European Union

  • While compiling the psychographic information for well-educated, mid/high income families that were between the age of 30-45, the research team noticed there was no real market research completed by geography alone, but more for familial status, education, and age. To test this hypothesis, Facebook Insights were used. This tool lets the user set up demographics to get insights about that group. For this test, identical demographics such as well-educated, mid/high income families that were between the age of 30-45 were used. An interest in gardening and technology was also added. The test was then ran for the United States, Germany, UK, France, and Sweden. Interests, web page likes, Facebook page likes, and employment information was compared for all the regions. The results were usually almost identical, indicating that for the most part the choices made in life pertaining to families, employment, and education tend to matter more than geography. To make sure, we conducted further research to try to find some different ideologies and discovered the following:
  • All areas researched share some of the highest standards of living in the world, further uniting their psychographic as one.
  • Spain, France, and the UK have similar ideologies to the US when it comes to things like believing one must work hard to get ahead in life, whereas countries such as Germany, Poland, Italy, and Greece tend to believe that their success is determined by forces beyond their control.
  • In Poland, Germany, and Italy, fewer than half of the people polled believed that people should be allowed to make statements that are offensive to another's religious beliefs or minorities, whereas in the US 77% believe they should be able to.
  • Religion is less important to Europeans than Americans.
  • Europeans tend to be less focused on consumerism than Americans.
  • Europeans, on the whole, are willing to give up some of their freedoms to make sure the state ensures no one is in need (55-67%). Americans, on the other hand, would much rather have their freedom (60%).
  • The UK is more similar to America in their beliefs, compared to the rest of the EU.
  • Western Europeans are much more accepting of alternate lifestyles than the US is. Spain (90%)leads the way, followed by France, Germany and Britain (all at 80%). In the US only 60% agree that one should be accepted regardless of lifestyle.

Home/Family

  • The older end of this age group is not only taking care of mostly teenagers but their older parents. 64% of the older people in this age group feel it is their responsibility to take care of aging parents.
  • 64% of the older people in this age group feel it is their responsibility to take care of aging parents.
  • The typical person in this group is most likely married, with 86% in this age group being mothers. (2.5 children per household).
  • There is a slim chance (10-15%) that they are a grandparent, and a possibility that her grandchildren share her home.
  • The younger women in this group account for 2/3 of all first time home buyers.

Work

  • They are reaching the height of their careers.
  • Chances are that they attended some kind of college (60%)
  • Women are most likely working mothers that average at least 25 hours per week. There is a 40% chance that she is the main breadwinner for the family.
  • Their work life is relatively stable, with 87% not changing jobs in the last year.
  • According to Facebook, the job types that are reported most are administrative services (24%), management (26%), sales (19%), production (16%), healthcare (13%), and education (14%), social services (11%), and business/finance (10%).

Travel

  •  More than half plan to take a vacation within the next 12 months, with the 40-45 age group having a higher percentage than the younger people in this group.
  • They will take an average of 4.2 trips this year.

Values/Views

  • This age group prefers authenticity. They value safety and security, so be honest and upfront with them.
  • They are generally accepting of others.
  • They highly value a work/life balance.
  • The men and women of this group are most likely registered to vote (76% & 80%) and is most likely politically moderate.
  • 42% believe that having fun is the whole point of life.
  • The majority (80%) would rather spend on experiences than things.
  • Social causes are important and ways to support them are sought out.
  • 76% of women in this group would like to be part of a special panel.
  • The women in this group are ready for a female president (83%) and would have voted for Hillary Clinton (49%).

Stressors

  • 81% wish they had more time to spend with their family.
  • 56% are overwhelmed by financial burdens.
  • They feel pessimistic about retirement.

Health Attitudes

  • 52% have a positive body image.
  • 67% try to exercise their brain and their body.
  • 20% have had a "wake up call" with their health in the last three years.
  • 57% consider themselves health conscious.

Shopping Behaviors/Attitudes

  • This group is more likely to use their mobile phone over a PC/laptop when searching for products to buy online. (59% vs. 54%). 30% have used their mobile phones to pay for a purchase in the last month.
  • This group is more likely to spend on others, such as children, than themselves.
  • The oldest end of this group (45+) outspends all other generations when it comes to housing, clothing, eating out, and entertainment.
  • The older end of this group is more likely to be loyal to a brand. 60% agree that if they find a brand they like, they will stick with it.
  • More than 90% researched a brand in the last month. The top categories they researched are travel (47%), clothing/apparel (43%), electronics (40%), and food or beverages (36%).
  • The younger people in this group will spend more for a socially responsible product.
  • More than half of the women in this group feel they are on top of their spending and 62% decide how the budget is spent.

Favorite Stores

  • Some of their favorite stores are Home Depot, Pottery Barn, Banana Republic, Finish Line, Foot Locker, and H&M.

Traditional Media Viewing

  • They will actively avoid commercials.
  • They spend an average of fifteen hours per week watching television.

Free Time

  • 40% fantasize about having a day when they have absolutely nothing to do.
  • They will spend 18-20 hours a week on leisure activities.
  • The most popular things to do with their free time are go out to eat (81%), socialize with friends and family (47%), and watch movies (62%).
  • 50% say they pick hobbies that help them unwind and destress.

Hobbies

  • Making home improvements was the most popular hobby (26%). Finding the latest tech, sports, gaming, reading, dance, crafting, fitness, music, board games, and cooking are also popular hobbies for this age group.
  • Of the women in this group, 57% gardened in the last year and 55% read.

Online Behaviors

  • The most popular activities for this group are Facebook (71%), YouTube (59%), Social networking (58%), banking (55%), and playing games on their phone (19%).

Digital Devices

  • They prefer to use their smartphone (81%) or laptop (81%). Her least favorite device is desktop (48%) or an e-reader (15%).

Digital Content

  • They are avid streamers. They subscribe to Netflix (68%), Amazon Prime (49%), Hulu (40%), Spotify (35%), and Satellite Radio (32%).
  • They consume seven different types of digital content: weather (68%), news (62%), music (50%), travel (39%), sports (35%), and finance (33%).

Social Media

  • Facebook is the number one platform for this age group, and is a sure bet for a platform to reach them.
  • Over 80-99% use social media.
  • Their preferred time to access social media is between 8 PM and midnight.
  • Their motivation to use social media is goal oriented. They use social media to stay up to date with the news and keep in touch with friends and family. Their top social media activities are consuming content (71%), sharing or reposting content (42%), and creating their own content (29%).
  • Social media is used as a referral system for many when researching products.

Facebook

  • For this group, the most popular Facebook pages are Pottery Barn Kids, Jane, imomsohard, Lime Lush Boutique, Smallwoods, Bringing Home the Browns, Modern Vintage Boutique, Canvas On Demand, Ooh La Llama, and Lolly Wolly Doodle.

YouTube

  • 73% regularly watch YouTube. The top five categories are home repair and improvement, cooking, technology use and repair, arts and crafts, and beauty and personal care.
  • YouTube is popular since it lets them connect with their kids and keep up with trends that are important to their children.
  •  DIY content is one of the most popular viewing topics.

Research Strategy

To obtain a psychographic for this group, we used generational research, but focused on educated, upper middle class demographics. When using Facebook Insights, we were able to get very exact results by entering the age group, economic status, familial status, interests (tech was used along with gardening), and employment.
Part
07
of eleven
Part
07

Stihl

Stihl primarily markets its general consumer lawn and garden products through digital marketing via its social media channels such as YouTube, Instagram, and Facebook.he requested information has been entered into rows three through six of column C of the attached spreadsheet.

Summary of Findings

  • The messaging used by Stihl in the United States market for its robotic lawnmower- iMOW includes claims of it being “efficient mower” and easy to use".
  • Stihl presents its robotic lawnmower as intelligent and once programmed, it "cares for their lawn automatically". The company reminds customers that their "free time is precious".
  • The company's tagline in the US is "mower to see the benefits for yourself". The tagline for France is "Ideal for mowing without effort", "Smart lawn care" in Germany, and "The shortcut to a perfect lawn" in Sweden.
  • The marketing channels used to market Stihl in the US are digital, on its website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and TV commercials.
  • Examples of marketing campaigns for Bosch's lawn mowers are included in this Google Document.
Part
08
of eleven
Part
08

John Deere

Column D, rows 3 – 6 of the attached spreadsheet have been populated with information on John Deere’s marketing efforts for its consumer lawn and garden products. Details on the messaging, tagline, marketing channels, and example efforts used in Germany, Sweden, France, and the U.S. are included.

John Deere Marketing Efforts

  • The brand messaging used by John Deere in the US market, specifically for its robotic lawnmower- the Tango E5 include claims of “convenient”, “discreet”, “completely weatherproof”, “no emissions”, “no clippings to dispose”, “quiet”, “intelligent”, “program(able)”, “reliable”, “durable”, “easy”, “intuitive (controls)”, “automatic way-finding”, “automatic recharge”, “dealer installation”, “the perfect solution”.
  • Their counterpart in France, Germany, and Sweden uses a common format which only repeats claims of “automatic”, “easy”, “intuitive (controls)”, “weatherproof”, “long-lasting”, “quiet”, and “dealer installation”. They’ve made additional claims on being “safe”, “smart”, “adapt(able)”, “smart” and “(functional) on sloping ground”.
Part
09
of eleven
Part
09

Honda

The requested details for the marketing of Honda's robotic lawnmower has been entered into column E of the attached spreadsheet.

Marketing Messaging

  • In the US, Honda presents Miimo, its robotic lawnmower, as an intelligent robotic lawn mower that uses computerized precision to automatically clip the lawn of its users to produce a healthy and well manicured lawn. This allows them to be free to do everything they like.
  • The marketing messaging for Miimo is similar in Germany, France, and Sweden. Miimo is portrayed as an intelligent robotic lawn mower that requires no assistance to take care of the lawn of its users. It even knows when to recharge itself once it has been programmed.

Taglines

Marketing Channels

  • The marketing channels used to market Miimo in the various countries are:
  • US: Digital which includes their website, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and Youtube. They also run TV ads.
  • German: Digital which includes their website, Facebook, Instagram, and Youtube. They also run TV and print ads.
  • France: Digital which includes their website, Facebook and Youtube. They also run TV ads.
  • Sweden: Digital which includes their website, Facebook and Youtube.
Part
10
of eleven
Part
10

Gardena

Gardena primarily markets its general consumer lawn and garden products through digital marketing via its global social media channels such as YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, and Pinterest. The requested information has been entered into rows three through six of column F of the attached spreadsheet.

Summary of Findings

  • The primary marketing message for Gardena's robotic lawn mower is that it is the perfect solution for easy lawn maintenance.
  • It maintains the same marketing message for France, the United States, and Germany. However, its message differs for Sweden, which focuses on highlighting the details of certain innovative features of the robotic lawn mower.
  • For Gardena France, the company's tagline reads, "SILENO robot mowers: The ideal solution for an always impeccable lawn. Take advantage of your free time and let the GARDENA robot mowers do the rest!"
  • Meanwhile, for Gardena Sweden, the company's tagline is "The groundbreaking robotic lawn mower which cuts and cuts and cuts."
  • The social media marketing channels employed by Gardena Worldwide include Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.
  • Here is a link to a YouTube video commercial from Gardena France.
  • In 2017, Rasmus Frashden worked on cross-branding for the company and developed marketing commercials for its lawn equipment.
  • Gardena has a detailed online brochure for its robotic lawn mower, which can serve as marketing material.
  • Gardena France frequently posts contests relevant to lawn equipment on its Instagram account.
Part
11
of eleven
Part
11

Bosch

Column G, rows 3 – 6 of the attached spreadsheet have been filled out with information on the competitiveness of Bosch Indego's lawn mower products. The details include the messaging, tagline, marketing channels, and links to commercials Bosch uses to market its products in Germany, Sweden, France, and the U.S. Below are briefs of the full details presented in the attached spreadsheet.

Bosch's Marketing Messaging, Taglines, Channels, and Commercials

Research Methodology

Your research team examined the Bosch websites for Germany, France, Sweden, and the U.S. to unearth the information about its marketing channels, messaging, taglines, and examples of commercials. However, we noted that in the U.S. Bosch website, the only products being marketed are indoor appliances and not outdoor. In this regard, we did not uncover any details for Bosch robotic lawn mowers in the U.S., though, we included the company's global marketing campaign for the Bosch Indego robotic lawn mower. Extensive searches on influencer marketing websites like Influo and ad platforms like Allspottv helped provide additional details on the marketing channels Bosch uses to promote its lawn mowers. Overall, full details regarding Bosch's robotic lawn mowers competitive landscape are included in the attached spreadsheet, column G.
Sources
Sources

From Part 01
From Part 04
From Part 05
Quotes
  • "While analysts and prognosticators seem to grant that the Millennial consumer is driving the next wave of consumer products and innovation, they have almost no idea how to relate to us in a meaningful way."
  • "We are the innovators and tastemakers who are influencing culture in ways previous generations only dreamed of. "
  • "Millennials are 2.5x more likely to be early adopters of technology, being both drivers and consumers of it. We want the latest and if we don’t like it, we drop it for something newer and more resonant. We are often leading the tightrope walk across “The Chasm,” which is the cliff most technologies never cross"
  • "Millennials are smart; we will pay more, do more, become loyalists and advocates as long as you provide what we consider added value. Authenticity allows you to engage with us, immediacy provides compelling content and social relevancy keeps you competitive. Marketing to Millennials is about advocacy, not advertising."
Quotes
  • "Positioned at the forefront of digital trends, this savvy generation have a knack for innovation and companies should be leveraging these skills. "
  • "The world that millennials are familiar with is one of vast technological improvements, increasing transparency and more personal relationships with brands. Constant shifting and reevaluating is becoming the norm and a strong innovation strategy should be at the heart of this"
  • "As increasing number of millennials are beginning to fill the void left by retiring baby boomers, the need for innovation will continue to rise."
  • "In a marketplace of fierce competition and fast-moving trends, remaining the same is no longer safe; disruption is key to remaining ahead of the innovation game."
Quotes
  • "If there is one word that defines the post-2000 generations, it would have to be “smart”. From smartphones to almost every other device and its “smarter” variant, the word has come to define products, services, and ideas that have reached a certain level of perfection in terms of utility, design and performance."
  • "The millennial generation prefers everything that is quick, cost-effective, and sustainable over the long term. That is why the adjective “smart” is spilling over from describing hi-tech gadgets to summarising the transformation happening in conventional domains such as transportation."
  • "Travel and transport is the leading contributor to pollution in the world, and in need of serious reform, both in terms of efficiency and sustainability. Millennials all over the world are leading the charge in initiating such a reform. Tired of being stuck in traffic, driving on congested and unsafe roads, and the incessant pollution caused by ineffective, archaic transportation systems, they are increasingly opting for smarter vehicles and transportation frameworks."
Quotes
  • "One thing we also know about millennials is that they are very mindful of environmental sustainability. They tend to do business with companies that are also mindful of the environment. So, it seems logical that they would look for homes that are - or at least re-configure homes they buy to be - “smart,” with the internet of things (IoT) devices that allow them to save energy and provide more convenience."
Quotes
  • "Millennials like owning things, but they don’t necessarily want the fancy car and suburban home that their Boomer parents wanted."
  • "In a world that can be overwhelming with the sheer mass of things in both physical and digital spaces, this generation wants to make space for what they truly value. This group doesn’t want it all. Instead, they want it all to be well-designed, well-functioning and well-thought-out."
  • "If your brand can understand why this consumer is so adamant about wanting quality over quantity, you will be in a better position to show why your product holds deep value for their modern lives."
Quotes
  • "The key elements to courting Generation Y consumers are convenience, authentic experience, ethics and sustainability. Modern packaging design has been acutely shaped to fit these values and maximise selling opportunities, with the landscape still continuing to develop."
  • "To meet modern convenience needs, brands have developed pack designs that are simple, fuss-free and reliable. "
  • "The packaging industry has become a great reflection of the world around us, and particularly for the millennial market, which harbour distinct values and ideals that have shaped the nature of modern packaging excellence. Lifestyle factors influence buyer behaviour, which in turn affects user needs, impacting pack design to accommodate these changes. The design of modern packaging, its features and production methods take into account the ideals that millennials hold to better appeal to the audience, acting as a competitive advantage to businesses that can leverage these factors. "
Quotes
  • "Millennials, people born between 1981 and 2000, are transforming everything from how we buy goods to how we work. In 2016, Millennials became the largest generation in the U.S. In addition to sheer size, this generation will be worth $24 trillion by 2020, according to UBS."
  • "“People think innovation is just having a good idea but a lot of it is just moving quickly and trying a lot of things” – Mark Zuckerberg, Co-founder & CEO, Facebook "
  • "“We built our business on creativity. And we’re going to have to go through an education process for the next five years to explain to people how our users and that creativity creates value” – Evan Spiegel, Co-founder & CEO, Snap Inc."
  • "The substantial purchasing power of Millennials means that companies are – or at the very least, should be – tailoring their product and service offerings around what they want."
  • "Projected to grow to $335 billion by 2025, the “on-demand” or “sharing” economy has changed how we live, travel and work. With Millennials reluctant to commit to choices such as owning a home, the on-demand economy provides this generation with the access that they are looking for, but not necessarily the burdens of a long-term commitment."
Quotes
  • "As Erin mentioned in her post about marketing to millennials, do-good brands have seen an upsurge—organic, ethically produced products are in high demand. The same can be said for marketing to Generation X. This generation is less prone to moving in the waves of trends, and is more likely to buy a service or product that somehow benefits society or the environment. "
  • "Toms is a good example of this—though not the most attractive type of shoe, their simple message of “one for one” bolstered this brand to success."
Quotes
  • "Generation Xers aren’t necessarily close to retirement — but they’re not too far off either. Emphasizing the durability and quality of products and how those products will transition as the Gen Xer’s life eventually changes — becoming empty nesters, retirement — adds value to the product and justifies an investment."
  • "Think Generation X doesn’t care about your website or digital presence? Odds are, they’re using their mobile devices first to research businesses before buying, and as previously stated, this generation takes product research seriously."
Quotes
  • "Gen X, those born between 1965 to 1979, are using smart technology to care for their elderly parents (Baby Boomers)—and for those folks, it’s all about adding comfort and simplicity to day-to-day routines. As Boomers seek the ability to safely and independently remain in their current homes—aging in place—smart homes that feature home security cameras and video doorbells to monitor visitors, deliveries, and potential intruders are on the rise."
  • "Millennials, who follow Baby Boomers and Generation X, comprise about 73 million people in the U.S. Millennials value ease of use and thrive on the ability to access everything they can with their smartphones. They crave the cool factor–opening the garage door and turning on the lights by voice command as they pull in the driveway or using domestic robots like vacuum cleaners and lawn mowers to manage chores that take time away from more enjoyable activities."
Quotes
  • "Gen X represents those consumers who remember a time without digital advertising and therefore respond equally to modern and traditional marketing."
  • "Perhaps the most noteworthy fact about Gen X in the eMarketer study is their extreme brand loyalty, relative to that of millennials and baby boomers. They have a high affinity for the brands they trust and are willing to pay a premium for their products, according to eMarketer. However, they are less interested in trying new brands compared to younger consumers."
From Part 06