Goop Consumer Profiling

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Goop Consumer Profiling

Affluent, female, and millennial consumers spend lots of time being physically active, are careful spenders, spend a lot of time-consuming social media, and are focused on positive virtues. In general, all consumer demographic segments appear to be keen skincare consumers, however, women appear to be more prolific skincare product consumers than men. A psychographic profile of skincare consumers has also been presented below, in addition to a deep dive of these collective findings.

Psychographic Profile of Affluent Consumers

Habits and Hobbies

  • 88% of affluent consumers read 30 minutes or more each day, while 63% listen to audio books while commuting.
  • "Two-thirds of wealthy people watch less than an hour of TV a day and almost that many—63 percent—spend less than an hour a day on the internet unless it is job-related."
  • 94% of affluent consumers say they have a habit of filtering their emotions.
  • About 75% of affluent consumers say they spent at least 5 hours a month volunteering or networking.
  • 70% of affluent consumers say they pursue a minimum of one major goal per year.
  • 86% of wealthy people say they socialize with other wealthy people.
  • In terms of the topics affluent people enjoy exploring, "79 percent read educational career-related material, 55 percent read for personal development, 58 percent read biographies of successful people, 94 percent read current events, 51 percent read about history, and 11 percent read purely for entertainment purposes."
  • The following pastimes are the most popular among those earning above $100,000: golfing, yoga, racquet sports, watching basketball, hiking, working out, watching football, boating, snowboarding, visiting museums, playing football, playing basketball, biking, weightlifting, and writing for personal interest.

Shopping Behaviors:

  • "A PwC survey cited by eMarketer found that 28% of workers who earn $100,000+ say they find it difficult to meet household expenses each month and 36% use credit cards to pay for necessities that they couldn’t afford otherwise."
  • Wealthy consumers tend to be thrifty shoppers, as 49% of affluent consumers with an income over $100,000 say they "tend to hold out on buying things I want until they go on sale."
  • "A survey by Simmons Research, as cited by eMarketer, found that affluent consumers are just as likely as non-affluent consumers to shop around to take advantage of specials/bargains and to hold off on buying things until they go on sale." Likewise, 54.2% of affluents over $100,000 say they "shop around a lot to take advantage of specials or bargains"
  • Affluent consumers are less interested in clearance items, as only 38.7% of affluents with an income over $100,000 say they "usually head right for the clearance rack when I enter a store."
  • "The biggest non-housing expenditure in most affluent ($125,000+ annual income) households is transportation (car, etc.) payments (20% of spending, on average). Home-and-garden products/services rank second (14% of spending), and are followed by insurance (10%)."
  • "An Ipsos survey cited by eMarketer found six in ten affluents ($100,000+ annual income) purchase luxury goods/services once a year or less, on average, and 21% say they never purchase luxury goods/services."
  • A majority of affluent consumers say they are careful with their spending and only splurge on luxury items occasionally.
  • 89% of HNW consumers "believe quality is more important than brand."
  • 67% of HNW consumers "favor quality over price."
  • 59% of HNW consumers "pay more for convenience"
  • 86% of HNW consumers "pay a premium for experiences they feel are valuable."
  • Affluent consumers tend to feel that reward programs do not sufficiently reward them based on the amount of money they spend and tend not to be impressed by loyalty programs as their income increases.

Media Consumption:

  • The affluent cohort makes up 44% of the U.S. national newspaper following.
  • About 50% of those who live in HNW households use LinkedIn. Only 10% of those in lower-income households are doing the same.
  • Among American adults who have a household income above $75,000: 83% use YouTube, 74% use Facebook, 42% use Instagram, 41% use Pinterest, 49% use LinkedIn, 22% use Snapchat, 31% use Twitter, 25% use WhatsApp, and 15% use Reddit.
  • Higher income consumers have reported consuming the following types of media within the past few weeks/months (i.e. since the corona virus outbreak): broadcast TV (43%), online TV/streaming movies (46%), online videos like YouTube and TikTok (42%), online press (28%), music streaming (38%), video games (26%), live streams (23%), radio (28%), books/literature (30%), podcasts (15%), physical press (10%), none of the above (10%).

Values/Attitudes:

  • According to Harris Poll insights, about 50% of affluent consumers worry about their financial situation on a frequent basis. Many don't see themselves as affluent and most are concerned about financial security and paying bills.
  • Most affluent consumers are married, family oriented, and come from high-stress two-worker households.
  • "An individual’s likelihood of being a Democrat decreases with every additional dollar he or she earns. Democrats have a huge advantage (63 percent) with voters earning less than $15,000 per year. This advantage carries forward for individuals earning up to $50,000 per year, and then turns in the Republicans’ favor — with just 36 percent of individuals earning more than $200,000 per year supporting Democrats."
  • Nearly half of all mass affluent consumers say they prefer patronizing stores that "reflect their values", while 37% say they would stop patronizing stores that don't, even if doing so means they have to pay more money.
  • 82% of affluent consumers say they are optimistic about the future.
  • Affluent consumers surveyed described themselves as honest (70%), intelligent (73%), friendly (66%), loyal (61%), and independent (58%).
  • Affluent consumers surveyed said they value friendship (61%), freedom (56%), and stability (53%).

Psychographic Profile of Female Consumers

Habits and Hobbies

  • The typical American women sleeps between 9pm and 7am. Most attend to their personal care twice per day on a typical weekday, once in the early morning and once at bedtime.
  • The typical American women spends several hours each day caring for other members of their household. On a weekday, these interactions tend to happen in the early morning and throughout the evening.
  • The typical American women spends most of the average weekday at work or doing work-related things. Usually this takes place between 7am and 6pm.
  • Higher percentages of women eat two meals per day, while a lesser percentage eats three meals a day. These meals usually take place in the early morning, around noon, and between the hours of 5pm and 8pm.
  • High percentages of American women make two commutes on a typical workday. This usually happens in the morning and late afternoon/early evening.
  • According to Statistia, the following leisure activities are popular among American women: reading (48%), watching TV (42%), spending time with loved ones (23%), using the internet (18%), watching movies (11%), walking/running/jogging (10%), working out (10%), gardening (9%), playing video games (8%), and sewing/needle work (7%).
  • American women typically spend two hours a day doing household activities, such as housework, interior cleaning, laundry, and organizing.
  • The typical American women spends at least some time shopping each day.
  • The typical American women spends about four hours a day relaxing, socializing, and enjoying leisure activities.

Shopping Behaviors:

  • On average, women spend 8.5 years of their life shopping.
  • Women are the biggest consumers in the beauty category and are the most likely to get influence from fashion magazines and TV shows.
  • "Research has shown that women tend to be concerned about illness and death, and are therefore more likely to spend money on preventative measures to remain fit and healthy. "
  • Women are the biggest consumers within the mass-luxury industry.
  • "Personal products cut across beauty, health and other segments of the market. In the United States alone, women spend more than two times on personal products than their male counterparts."
  • Women tend to be brand loyal and hold most of the buying power. Social media and email are key engagement channels for this demographic.
  • Women tend to shop around before buying and seek products that clearly stand out from the competitors. They seek out things like warranties and after-sales service, and want a lot of details before making a purchase decision.
  • 55% of women surveyed said they are more likely to recommend a brand if the brand had advertisements that featured women who look like them, and 58% said they were more likely to purchase if this was the case.

Media Consumption:

  • Female consumers have reported consuming the following types of media within the past few weeks/months (i.e. since the corona virus outbreak): broadcast TV (33%), online TV/streaming movies (32%), online videos like YouTube and TikTok (34%), online press (24%), music streaming (24%), video games (20%), live streams (16%), radio (18%), books/literature (19%), podcasts (9%), physical press (9%), none of the above (20%).
  • Women are the biggest consumers of social media. "Three-quarters (76%) of online adult women use Facebook. Women also make up the majority of users on Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr and Pinterest."

Values/Attitudes:

  • Women value visual appeal, conversational approaches, and personalization. They want to be inspired.
  • Women are more responsive to positivity than negativity.
  • This demographic tends to dislike stereotypes about themselves.
  • A survey of women in 2018 found that most do not feel that they are represented in media images and they want to see media feature a more diverse range of women, in terms of age, size, and ethnicity.
  • Women surveyed mostly agree that beauty is not defined by age. They feel that 'oldness' is relative and doesn't apply to them.
  • A majority of women surveyed believe health is more important than beauty.
  • 42% of women surveyed "dread getting older."

Psychographic Profile of Millennial Consumers

Habits and Hobbies:

  • "80% of Gen Z and Millennials have at least one hobby."
  • 71% of millennials listen to music for fun, which the most common hobby among the cohort.
  • Other activities millennials enjoy include watching and playing sports, creative pursuits, and physical activity (fitness, dance, running, outdoor activities, and walking/hiking).
  • Other hobbies ranked in the top 20 for millennials are: gaming, reading, cooking/baking, art, TV/Netflix, crafting, writing, sewing, travel, movies, photography, shopping and food.
  • According to the BLS Millennial Time Use Survey, millennials spend about 9.68 hours per day on sleeping and grooming.
  • Millennials spend about 1.5 hours a day eating, and nearly 2 hours a day on household activities (housework, food prep, etc).
  • They spend about 45 minutes a day caring for other members of their household, and around five hours a day working.
  • This cohort spends about 4.5 hours a day on leisure and sports activities, which includes about 3 hours and 45 minutes of socializing and relaxing.

Shopping Behaviors:

  • Most millennials prefer the experience of shopping in store vs. online, as doing so allows them to better experience the product before deciding if they want to buy it.
  • "Online and mobile channels are important to Millennials, providing the information and insights they need to find the best products and services. Many hone their shopping skills on the Internet, checking product ratings and reviews or feedback on retailers, for example, to confirm that both product and vendor provide the best value and service, respectively."
  • 68% of millennials expect brands to provide a seamless experience across channels and devices, and in doing so, they want to be able to move from mobile, to PC, to in-store during the span of the shopping experience.
  • Millennials seek customer-centric shopping experiences, want to feel welcomed when visiting in-store, and want to feel like they are valued as a customer. They want personalized promotions and discounts, as well as loyalty programs.
  • "95 percent or more of Millennials say they want their brands to court them actively, and coupons sent via email or mailed to their homes currently (or will in the future) have the most influence on them. Other channels, such as text messages, have an influence on just over half of all respondents in terms of their shopping behaviors."

Media Consumption:

  • Millennial consumers have reported consuming the following types of media within the past few weeks/months (i.e. since the corona virus outbreak): broadcast TV (35%), online TV/streaming movies (44%), online videos like YouTube and TikTok (41%), online press (36%), music streaming (35%), video games (31%), live streams (30%), radio (26%), books/literature (20%), podcasts (20%), physical press (19%), none of the above (10%).
  • Within the past several weeks/months (i.e. since the corona virus outbreak), millennials have reported spending the most time on the following internet activities: listening to music, watching movies, watching funny videos, looking at memes, playing computer games, looking for recipes, reading business/finance articles, searching for discounts, reading about healthy eating, and reading sports news.
  • As of 2017, 68% of millennials had a streaming subscription.
  • More than half of millennials said they play video games frequently in a 2017 survey conducted by Deloitte.

Values/Attitudes:

  • 70% of millennials are "concerned with staying healthy as they age."
  • 64% of millennials "believe in the concept of healthy aging."
  • "Fifty-five percent said business has a positive impact on society, down from 61 percent in 2018."
  • 49% of millennials said they would quit their current job within the next two years if they could.
  • Millennials prefer dealing with brands that align with their values and are keen to lessen or end their relationship with a brand if they disagree with the company's practices, values, or political ideologies.
  • 50% of millennials want to be wealthy.
  • "The youngest generations are no less ambitious than their predecessors; more than half want to earn high salaries and be wealthy."
  • "Travel and seeing the world was at the top of millennials’ list of aspirations (57 percent), while slightly fewer than half said they wanted to own a home (49 percent). They also were more attracted to making a positive impact in their communities or society at large (46 percent) than in having children and starting families (39 percent)."
  • 71% have a positive attitude towards technology and social media, but 50% think social media does more harm than good. 60% of millennials feel they would be happier without social media.
  • "Only 14 percent of millennials strongly agree that the benefits of technology outweigh the risks associated with sharing personal data, 79 percent are concerned they’ll be victims of online fraud, and a quarter of millennials have curtailed consumer relationships because of companies’ inability to protect data."

Demographics of Skincare Consumers

  • The key players operating in the global skin care products market are Johnson & Johnson and Dove (Unilever).
  • Analysis of these companies' consumers using the Numerator and SimilarWeb database and research into consumer survey data has been conducted to gain an understanding of this industry's general consumer base.

Age:

  • Johnson & Johnson: Fairly equal across all generations, but the 25-34 age group has the lead.
  • Dove: Dove's consumers skew younger, with the share of consumption increasing as age decreases, but is moderately equal across all generations.
  • 54% of consumers in the U.S. between the ages of 18 and 29 use skincare products every day. The same is true for 52% of 30-59 year-olds, and 44% of those 60+.

Gender:

  • Johnson & Johnson: Visitors to the J&J website are fairly equal between men (50.13%) and women (49.87%).
  • Dove: Visitors to Dove's website are mostly female (66.97%), while men hold a 33.03% share.
  • 65% of women report using skincare products every day.
  • 37% of men say they use skincare products every day.

Income:

  • Johnson & Johnson: This brand is fairly equally embraced across all income levels, but the majority are in the affluent category.
  • Dove: The brand is fairly equally embraced across all income levels, but the majority are in the lower income levels.
  • Consumers with higher incomes report using skin products more frequently than those with lower incomes. For example, 57% of those with incomes between $50,000 and $100,000 say they use skincare products every day, while the same is true for 54% of those with incomes over $100,000. Meanwhile, only 47% of those with incomes below $50,000 said the same.

Education:

  • Johnson & Johnson: Consumers across all education levels embrace this brand, but the majority of the share is held by those with advanced degrees.
  • Dove: Consumers across all education levels embrace this brand, but the majority of the share is held by those with no college.

Family Status:

  • Johnson & Johnson: This brand is embraced by both family types equally (kids vs. no kids).
  • Dove: This brand is embraced by both family types fairly equally (kids vs. no kids), but is slightly more popular among those with children.

Location:

  • Johnson & Johnson: The majority of visitors to the J&J website are from the United States (54.59%), with the next highest share coming from Belgium (3.75%), India (3.70%), the U.K. (3.24%) and Switzerland (3.07%).
  • Dove: Visitors to the Dove website mostly come from the United States (30.75%), while other major shares going to the Ukraine (9.89%), the U.K. (5%), Canada (5%), and Brazil (4.38%).
  • Within the U.S. consumers that are searching for skincare on Google have the highest concentrations in New York, California, Washington D.C. Hawaii, Massachusetts, Washington, Oregon, Colorado, New Jersey, and Connecticut.
  • From a global perspective. Consumers that are searching for skincare on Google have the highest concentrations in Indonesia, Malaysia, Ireland, Singapore, Australia, New Zealand, the U.K. Hong Kong, Vietnam, and the U.S.

Psychographics of Skincare Consumers

Interests:

  • Visitors to the Johnson and Johnson website have the following interests, according to SimilarWeb: work/employment, news and media, computers, colleges/universities, software development, financial news, pharmaceuticals, fashion, home, design, the internet, health care, medicine, stocks, business and technology.
  • Visitors to the Dove website have the following interests, according to SimilarWeb: news and media, lifestyle, beauty, cosmetics, TV movies and streaming, computers, video games, coupons, international news, U.S. news, magazines, Google, science, blogging, design, community, shopping, business news, clothing, reading, and food.

Purchase Motivators and Habits:

  • Aging and dryness are the most commonly reported reasons for why Americans use skincare products.
  • Acne is the biggest skin anxiety for younger skincare consumers, while older generations say wrinkles are their primary concern.
  • U.S. skincare consumers, especially women, are increasingly using online research to understand the ingredients in their skincare products.
  • Skincare consumers are on the lookout for products that are new and of a better quality than those they are current using. This is true even if they are currently satisfied with their existing brands. This response was given by 80%-85% of consumers surveyed.

Purchase Behaviors:

  • Consumers shopping for Johnson & Johnson products were mostly shopping in the afternoon (33%) and evening (29%). The majority of purchases were made at drug stores and mass markets. They spend an average of $2.72 on J&J products per shopping trip, and spend an average of $41.93 on the total trip.
  • Consumers shopping for Dove products were mostly shopping in the afternoon (35%) and evening (27%). The majority of purchases were made at drug stores, dollar stores, and club stores, with mass markets also holding a very high share. They spend an average of $5.50 on Dove products per shopping trip, and spend an average of $51.53 on the total trip.
  • 89% of skincare consumers surveyed said they would be willing to pay a higher price for products that are more high quality.

Values:

  • Skincare consumers value brands that commit to using natural ingredients and are transparent.
  • 46% of skincare consumers say they look for products that don't have sulfates, phthalates, or gluten.
  • 50% of female skincare consumers seek out skincare products that have organic ingredients.
  • Skincare consumers are highly influential and seeking to be influenced, as 88% said they share skincare product information with their friends and family, while 81% said they ask their friends and family for skincare product advice.


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