Gap Analysis

Part
01
of two
Part
01

Please conduct a gap analysis of Pictet's competitors on maternity and paternity policies: Aberdeen Group, AXA Winterthur, Capital Group, BNP Paribas.

Hello, and thank you for your request for a gap analysis around maternity and paternity polices at four of Pictet's competitors. I have reviewed the available policies for Aberdeen Asset Management, AXA Winterthur, The Capital Group and BNP Paribas. I was able to find information in these areas for all but The Capital Group, which does not make its policies publicly available.

In short, Aberdeen, AXA and BNP all offer maternity and paternity leave. Aberdeen's training programs appear to be the most robust of the four companies, while BNP Paribas has strong family / parent networks available to its employees. I found evidence that Aberdeen, AXA, and BNP Paribas all have strong programs to ensure that family issues and work-life balance for parents are a part of the corporate culture.

I have summarized my finding in this spreadsheet. Please read on for notes on the results and my methodology.

METHODOLOGY
The primary source of information for each of these companies was the corporate website. I focused my search, at first, for information specifically related to the Swiss branches of these global companies, in an effort to give you an "apples to apples" companions with Pictet. Unfortunately, this search returned no country specific information. Therefore, I expanded my search to look for global polices around maternity and paternity issues, where I was able to find more detailed information. I supported the data found on corporate websites with that found in reports archived on the UN Global Compact website, which houses a number of corporate responsibility reports. Additionally, I consulted review sites like FairyGodBoss to see if users had reported any additional information that would be useful for this analysis.

QUALIFICATIONS
There are a few key qualifications that should be noted in regards to the data presented.

Aberdeen: Your request specified inclusion of Aberdeen Group. Upon initial research, I found that Aberdeen Group to be a technology and services company, which did not seem to qualify as a competitor of Pictet, an asset management company. I therefore conducted research on Aberdeen Asset Management, a global asset management company based out of Scotland. Note that I have included some information from a 2013 Aberdeen corporate responsibility report. While this information is older than Wonder typically likes to include, it provided additional detail into the workings of the company's leadership and training programs around maternity and paternity issues. I have noted which information is from that older report. As I was not able to confirm the data with more recent findings, it is possible that it is no longer entirely representative of current company policies.

AXA Winterthur: I could find no information on benefits offered by AXA Winterthur. They are listed as a local entity of AXA, and therefore the polices included in the spreadsheet are reflective of the global organization.

The Capital Group: Despite a through search of the corporate and Swiss websites for The Capital Group, as well as government databases, industry trade publications and trusted new sources, I was not able to uncover any information regarding maternity or paternity policies. The corporate website offers very vague information on its overall benefits package, but only to say, essentially, that they have one. Their Work Environment and Diversity and Inclusion pages were also not particularly illuminating. I have included what little information that I could find in the spreadsheet.

CONCLUSION
To sum it up, Aberdeen, AXA and BNP all offer maternity and paternity leave. Aberdeen's training programs appear to be the most robust of the four companies, while BNP Paribas has strong family / parent networks available to its employees. I found evidence that Aberdeen, AXA, and BNP Paribas all have strong programs to ensure that family issues and work-life balance for parents are a part of the corporate culture. The Capital Group does not make its policies publicly available.

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Part
02
of two
Part
02

Please conduct a gap analysis of Pictet's competitors: Philip Morris International, Procter & Gamble, Nestle, General Mills. We'd like to understand how they handle policies, training, resources & logistics, and leadership around maternity and paternity issues, to help inform your gap analysis.

Hello, and thank you for your request for a gap analysis around maternity and paternity polices at four of Pictet's competitors. I have reviewed the available policies for Philip Morris International, Procter & Gamble, Nestle and General Mills. I was able to find information for these companies, specifically relating to Switzerland, for all but General Mills, which only publishes very general US policies.

In short, all companies seem to follow at least the legal minimum for maternity leave in Switzerland, which is 14 weeks for mothers and 5 days for men and Philip Morris International, Procter & Gamble, Nestle all have options for extending maternal leave for up to a year. In general, all four companies (including General Mills, at least in the US) have strong programs to ensure that family is a part of the corporate culture.

I have summarized my findings in this spreadsheet. Please read on for notes on the results and my methodology.

METHODOLOGY
The primary source of information for each of these companies was the corporate website and employee agreements published on Swiss labor rights websites. Because of this, please be advised a lot of sources are in French. I've also supplemented this information from review sites like WorkingMother and the Swiss site of Glassdoor to find general statements about employee benefits.



PHILIP MORRIS INTERNATIONAL

My main source for PMI was this site detailing the labor agreement for the Neuchâtel Philip Morris offices as well as their corporate site for evidence of employee programs and perks. I've also relied on press releases and review sites detailing things like the prevalence of childcare within PMI offices and corporate culture.

PROCTER & GAMBLE

The main source for P&G was this labor-related site detailing the benefits employees get when working in their Switzerland office. Their corporate website had less information about paternity issues, so I've relied more heavily on press releases and general news stories for evidence of any trainings, mentorships, parental logistics and workshops. These detail global and Swiss policies that P&G follows.

NESTLÉ

Again, for Nestlé, my main source was the previous site detailing the benefits employees get when working in their Switzerland office. Nestlé's site has a lot of information on it regarding parental care, as they also heavily promote things like breastfeeding and natural food for the general public. Because of this, I've filtered as much as I could to specifically cite those that pertain to employees. Most information came directly from here, but I've pulled data from other review sites and sites dealing with organizations sponsored by Nestlé.

GENERAL MILLS

Unfortunately, information about the Switzerland office of General Mills is very scarce. Even a rudimentary Google search for "General Mills" filtered to the Switzerland region turns up mostly job postings and stories about the cereals, nothing about the company. As such, I had to stick to the US corporate website and news stories about the employee benefits at their headquarters. They are very much a leader in perks in the US, appearing frequently in "best places to work"-type articles but it's hard to say if that holds true in Switzerland with the lack of information.

CONCLUSION

To sum it up, all companies seem to follow at least the legal minimum for maternity leave in Switzerland, which is 14 weeks for mothers and 5 days for men and Philip Morris International, Procter & Gamble, Nestle all have options for extending maternal leave for up to a year. In general, all four companies (including General Mills, at least in the US) have strong programs to ensure that family is a part of the corporate culture. I have summarized my findings in this spreadsheet.

Thanks for using Wonder! We look forward to helping you with your next question.
Sources
Sources

From Part 01
From Part 02