Food Safety Industry Overview and Trends

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Food Safety Industry Overview and Trends

Food Safety Industry Overview and Trends: A Four-Part Presentation

The first section below presents the top four challenges facing the food industry, as identified by three or four industry experts, analysts, and/or thought leaders. The challenges are all consumer- or regulation-based: (1) consumer demand for product innovation, transparency, labeling, and traceability; (2) requirements for food quality, compliance with regulations, and food safety; (3) consumer health consciousness, including organic, vegetarian, and vegan products; and (4) channel progression/e-commerce demands.

The second section presents three companies that are involved in traceability efforts: Walmart and Sam's Club US and Walmart Canada, Carrefour (a French company), and Bumble Bee Foods.

The third section presents three case studies of recent foodborne illness outbreaks where whole genome sequencing (WGS) was used in attempts to track down the source of the foodborne illnesses. The three case studies, all of which occurred in the US in 2019 and 2020, involved Romaine lettuce, ground beef, and clover sprouts.

The fourth section presents lists of food safety trade publications for two of the countries requested: US and Japan. For the other countries listed (Canada, South Korea, Thailand, Brazil, and Germany), no locally-produced food safety trade publications could be identified, but published articles providing information on the countries' food safety situations or other useful publications have been supplied where they could be found for all of the countries except China. We located an alleged food safety magazine published in China, but the website was in Chinese and we could not read it.

I. Top Four Challenges Facing the Food Industry

These four challenges were selected for presentation because they were identified in at least three or four industry publications focused on food industry challenges.

Consumer Demand for Product Innovation, Transparency, Labeling, and Traceability
  • This challenge was mentioned by four recent food and beverage industry articles, as cited below. It affects every segment of the food and beverage industry. Consumers all over the world are demanding new products, transparency about their origin and processing, clear labels that contain all relevant information, and a method of tracing the ingredients to their sources.
  • This challenge includes the need for food and beverage manufacturers "to keep up with evolving consumer demand for new products to try, in greater varieties...."
  • This challenge also includes "consumer demand for detailed information about products—such as where exactly the ingredients come from, or how environmentally friendly the product might be."
  • This challenge includes the need to "label products with easy-to-understand and comprehensive information" that addresses "food-related health problems like obesity, diabetes and hypertension." Food growers, producers, and manufacturers now need to label their products with facts and statistics that will help consumers who have health problems to determine whether they can safely consume the products.
  • Traceability is one of the biggest challenges in the food industry, both for record management and revenue generation. Consumers are increasingly interested in knowing "what goes into their food"... and where it comes from. This requires food producers and manufacturers to maintain "precise data records".
  • Traceability can include the demand for "hyper-local supply chains: going back to our roots and using ingredients grown in the same country, county, or even neighborhood."
  • Food producing companies are deploying "advanced technology, such as IoT, AI, and the blockchain, for tasks such as supply chain analysis, weight measurement, [and] temperature monitoring...." With these tools, food producers can track "every ingredient in a supply chain" to meet customer expectations and regulatory requirements.
  • This challenge includes having "other means to reach consumers, such as mobile-friendly websites and smart labels" on products, not just mass media advertising.
Requirements for Food Quality, Compliance with Regulations, and Food Safety
  • This challenge was mentioned by 3 industry articles, cited below.
  • The food and beverage industries in most countries are governed by regulations. In the US, government organizations including the FDA, EPA, OSHA, and FTC enforce norms addressing product health claims, product safety, food labels, and hygienic production environments.
  • This challenge includes managing "label requirements that vary by both country of origin and [countries] where the products will be consumed." In addition to managing current requirements, the labeling rules and laws are constantly changing among the countries of origin and the countries where the products are used.
  • Government and manufacturer recalls must be managed to assure consumers that products are safe to eat. Labeling can assist with recall techniques.
Consumer Health Consciousness, Including Organic, Vegetarian, and Vegan Products
  • This challenge was mentioned by 4 industry articles, cited below.
  • Today, consumers are increasing their demand for healthy food, including organic food.
  • More consumers are buying vegetarian and vegan products. Demand has declined for meat and other animal products.
  • Consumers are paying more attention to "the environmental and ethical aspects of animal products than they did in the past. This is reflected in consumer buying habits: plant-based food sales were up 20 percent in 2018; and non-dairy milk sales [were] up by 9 percent versus a 6 percent drop for cows' milk" in 2018.
  • Consumers are demanding that healthier ingredients be used in basic products like bread and pizza bases. They want "artificial ingredients" eliminated from products.
  • Consumers want "healthy products that provide ample nutrients" but do not [alter] "the aesthetics of the brand." The desire to maintain brand integrity "has led to a variety of nutrient-rich foods making it to supermarket aisles, labeled ‘gluten-free’, ‘dairy-free’, ‘sugar-free’", contains 'trans fats', or 'contains GMO'.
Channel Progression/E-commerce,
  • This challenge was mentioned by 3 industry articles, cited below.
  • "Customer loyalty and [company] profits are heavily influenced by how and where products are sold", according to Infor.com. How and where products are sold are issues of purchasing "channels". Traditional food buying channels include brick and mortar grocery stores, outdoor seasonal farmers' markets, and roadside stands in the US.
  • The food and beverage industry has been affected "by the proliferation of e-commerce channels. Consumers are embracing home delivery of groceries (such as with Amazon Fresh or FreshDirect), and physically picking up groceries from their local grocery store after ordering them online."
  • An online presence is a relatively new requirement for food and beverage companies. Today's consumers are "tech-savvy and socially informed" and demand that groceries be available for purchase online, with or without delivery service. Many consumers no longer want to make daily or weekly trips to brick and mortar grocery stores.
  • The challenge of e-commerce has been enhanced by COVID-19. Food and beverage businesses that have remained open during the pandemic of 2020 have had to respond immediately to consumer demand and government requirements for contact-free purchase and delivery.
  • In addition, during COVID-19, "Countrywide lockdowns have prevented employees from working in factories, severely impacting the supply chain" and adding to the challenge of changing over to or providing the new option of e-commerce.
Other challenges mentioned one time each in industry articles:

II. Three Companies/Brands Involved in Traceability

Three of the companies investing in traceability software and methods are Walmart, Carrefour, and Bumble Bee Foods.

Walmart (US, Canada, and worldwide)
  • Walmart US is using blockchain technology "to identify contaminated products" and to "collect environmental data from end-to-end, across the food supply chain." In addition, Walmart Canada has implemented a freight-tracking system that works worldwide.
  • One of Walmart's traceability test projects dealt with "tracing the origins of the mangoes being sold across Walmart’s stores in the United States, while [a second project] [sought] to trace the pork meat being sold via the company’s different Chinese outlets".
  • "From an efficiency perspective, the research team at Walmart claims that by making use of this new system, the time needed to trace the firm’s provenance has dropped from seven days to just 2.2 seconds." This quick response would be a terrific help during efforts to find contaminated food sources.
  • Walmart's third reported traceability effort required all suppliers of leafy green vegetables "to upload their data on a blockchain. Each node in the network will be a supplier that handled the product, making the supply chain completely transparent."
  • In 2019, Walmart and Sam's Club outlets in the US "asked all their suppliers to come on board an IBM-based blockchain supply chain system for tracking produce from farm to shelf."
  • "The Canadian division of Walmart ... launched a blockchain-based supply chain that includes freight tracking and payment processing for 70 trucking companies whose goods are transported to more than 400 retail stores."
  • "The system [went] live [in 2019] and all of Walmart Canada's third-party freight carriers [were] to be on the network by Feb. 1, 2020...." The system uses a distributed ledger network.
  • "The distributed ledger network used by Walmart, DL Asset Track, "was created by Walmart and its tech partner, Toronto-based DLT Labs. The system automates the tracking of freight shipments and invoice creation; it uses IoT sensors and GPS tracking in semi-trailer trucks as well as a web portal and a mobile app where information can be input manually by operators and suppliers."
  • "DL Asset Track will literally track every shipment to Walmart's Canadian stores."
Carrefour (a French company)
  • "In March 2018, Carrefour launched a blockchain initiative to trace its chickens, tomatoes, eggs, milk, salmon and cheese." In addition to providing "transparency and safety for consumers, the blockchain project also aimed to act as a showcase for suppliers. If consumers appreciated the food from a particular supplier, [Carrefour] might go back to that supplier."
  • The project was intended "to record information [on a blockchain] on how, for example, a chicken was reared, what food it ate, the medication that was used and where it lived..., thereby making it immutable. This offers consumers guarantees about product origin and quality."
  • Carrefour SA sales have increased since implementing blockchain ledger technology "to track meat, milk and fruit from farms to stores...." Carrefour plans to extend the blockchain ledger service to more products.
  • According to Carrefour, "Blockchains digital tracking technology allows customers to see detailed information on products like when it was harvested or packed - reassuring them on the quality of items they buy and allowing them to avoid products with genetically modified organisms, antibiotics or pesticides if they want." It provides customers with more choices in the products that they buy.
  • So far, as of 2019, "Carrefour has launched blockchain information for 20 items including chicken, eggs, raw milk, oranges, pork and cheese, and will add 100 more ... with a focus on areas where consumers want reassurance, like baby and organic products."
Bumble Bee Foods
  • Bumble Bee Foods, an American company, distributes canned salmon, tuna, other seafood and chicken. In 2019, the company began recording yellowfin tuna "on a blockchain to increase traceability and transparency and prevent mislabeling and fraud. When consumers scan a QR code, they receive insights on where the tuna originated, which community caught it, the size of the catch, and how it came to be certified as fair trade."
  • Bumble Bee Foods implemented the blockchain technology so that "consumers and customers [could] access information as the to the origin and supply chain journey of Bumble Bee Food’s Natural Blue by Anova yellowfin tuna through the use of smartphones and QR codes on product packaging."
  • "Bumble Bee Foods uses a private blockchain developed by SAP. Using distributed ledger technology, every participant in a supply chain has access to real-time data. This data is immutable, traceable and verifiable." The purpose of using a private blockchain is to assure that consumers can trust that their canned tuna is safe and healthy. Eventually, this ensures trust that the canned tuna is safe to eat. "Since its launch, it has received overwhelming positivity from retailers."
  • "Bumble Bee started its consumer-focused "Trace My Catch" supply chain visibility program in 2015 with its core product, albacore tuna. It eventually extended the program to its salmon and sardine product lines."
  • Here is how the Bumble Bee Foods system of Trace My Catch works. "At the Trace My Catch section of Bumble Bee's website, consumers input a code from the can or pouch. The site retrieves ... information specific to the product including: fish species, fishing method, the ocean where the fish was caught, vessel names and countries, fishing trip dates, and processing location."
  • "The long tail of traceability back to the point of origin is a growing concern among consumers, who began questioning where their food comes from and holding food companies responsible for their supply chain practices." Bumble Bee responded to consumer concerns with its Trace My Catch system.

III. Three Instances of WGS Use to Track Foodborne Illness

Three recent instances of foodborne illness where whole genome sequencing (WGS) was used to track foodborne illness are the 2019 and 2020 outbreaks of illness from romaine lettuce, ground beef, and clover sprouts contamination.

Romaine Lettuce from Salinas Valley, California: 2019
  • According to the website of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), in this outbreak "167 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 were reported from 27 states."
  • The CDC verified that "85 hospitalizations were reported, including 15 people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. No deaths were reported."
  • "Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicated that romaine lettuce from the Salinas Valley growing region in California was contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 and made people sick."
  • "In this investigation, WGS showed that bacteria isolated from ill people were closely related genetically. This means that people in this outbreak were more likely to share a common source of infection. WGS also showed that this outbreak was caused by the same strain of E. coli O157:H7 that caused outbreaks linked to leafy greens in 2017 and to romaine lettuce in 2018."
  • Two of the companies involved were Ready Pac Foods and Fresh Express. "The Maryland Department of Health identified the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 in an unopened package of Ready Pac Foods Bistro® Chicken Caesar Salad collected from a sick person’s home in Maryland. The Wisconsin Department of Health Services identified the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 in an unopened bag of Fresh Express® Leafy Green Romaine collected from an ill person’s home in Wisconsin. The Salinas Valley growing region in California was the main source of the romaine lettuce in both products."
Ground Beef from Unidentified Source(s): 2019
  • According to the CDC, "This multistate investigation began on March 28, 2019, when officials in Kentucky and Georgia notified CDC of this outbreak. Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicated that ground beef was the likely source of this outbreak."
  • The CDC website reported that "209 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O103 were reported from 10 states."
  • During the outbreak, "Twenty-nine people were hospitalized. Two cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure, were reported. No deaths were reported."
  • Through WGS, the CDC reported that "the strain of E. coli O103 was identified in a sample of ground beef collected from a location where ill people reported eating. DNA fingerprinting was performed on E. coli bacteria isolated from ill people using a standardized laboratory and data analysis method called whole genome sequencing (WGS)."
  • According to accepted protocols, the CDC supervised "traceback investigations of beef eaten by ill people.... A common supplier of ground beef to grocery stores and other locations where ill people reported eating was not identified."
  • "USDA-FSIS and state regulatory officials collected products for testing at retailers and establishments, and all products tested were negative for E. coli."
Fresh Clover Sprouts: 2020
  • An outbreak of foodborne illness occurred during February, March, and April 2020. Investigations revealed that Chicago Indoor Gardens and Jimmy Johns LLC were the sources of contamination of clover sprouts.
  • "CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigated a multistate outbreak of E. coli O103 infections linked to clover sprouts."
  • According to the CDC website, "51 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O103 were reported from 10 states. 3 people were hospitalized. No deaths were reported."
  • Epidemiologic, traceback, and laboratory evidence indicated that clover sprouts were the source of this outbreak.
  • In interviews, conducted by government personnel, "ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures they had in the week before their illness started. Eighteen (56 percent) of 32 people interviewed reported eating sprouts. This percentage is significantly higher than results from a survey of healthy people in which 8 percent reported eating sprouts in the week before they were interviewed."
  • "Seventeen (63 percent) of 27 people interviewed reported eating sprouts at a Jimmy John’s restaurant. Jimmy John’s LLC reported that all of their restaurants stopped serving clover sprouts on February 24, 2020. Clover sprouts are no longer available at Jimmy John’s restaurants."
  • During the course of the investigation, "FDA identified the outbreak strain of E. coli O103 in samples of Chicago Indoor Garden products that contain sprouts. On March 16, 2020, Chicago Indoor Garden recalled all products containing red clover sprouts."
  • "As of April 22, 2020, this outbreak appear[ed] to be over."

IV. Food Safety Trade Publications

United States
  • Food Safety Magazine. This is a bimonthly magazine designed to present "science-based solutions for food safety & quality assurance professionals worldwide." The magazine's website can be found at foodsafetymagazine.com.
  • Food Quality & Safety Magazine. This magazine, published in New Jersey, is a Wiley publication. The magazine's website can be found at foodsafetyandquality.com.

Canada
  • We were not able to identify any food safety trade publications originating in Canada. However, we noted that Food Safety Magazine carries articles about Canadian food safety.
  • A Canadian government website offers a variety of articles about food safety and food regulations in Canada.

South Korea
  • We were not able to identify any food safety trade publications originating in South Korea. However, the South Korean government has a website for its Ministry of Food and Drug Safety that contains useful information in English.
  • A food safety publication originating in Switzerland has an office in South Korea. It is called SGS. Information can be found here.
  • The local office website address of SGS can be found here.

China
  • We were not able to identify any English-language food safety trade publications originating in China, although we found mention of a China Food Safety Magazine online.
  • This website was listed for the magazine: http://www.cnfoodsafety.com. This website is in Chinese, and we could not read it.

Japan
  • Food Safety is the official food safety magazine of Japan. It is published quarterly.
  • The magazine describes itself as "a peer-reviewed open-access online journal of English published quarterly by the Food Safety Commission of Japan (FSCJ). Since the first issue was published in December of 2013, this journal has been regularly published on broad fields of sciences on food-related risk assessments."

Thailand
  • We were not able to identify any food safety trade publications originating in Thailand. However, we found an article about the food safety situation that may be useful.
  • This article was presented at the First Expert Meeting on Trade Facilitation Through an APEC Framework on Food Safety Modernisation, Ha Noi, Viet Nam, 15-17 November 2017. It is titled "Current Situation & Challenges for food safety modernisation or enhancement" in Thailand.
  • A second article, this one about food hygiene and sanitary conditions in one area of Thailand, may provide helpful information.

Brazil
  • We were not able to identify any food safety trade publications originating in Brazil.
  • However, we located one scholarly article that may provide helpful information about food safety in Brazil.

Germany
  • We were not able to identify any food safety trade publications originating in Germany.
  • However, we located a food industry trade publication called "Food Europe", designed for European executives of food organizations. It is published in the UK. The website is foodeurope.eu.com.
Helpful Findings
  • An international publication called "Food Protection Trends" is published by the International Association for Food Protection (IAFP). It is designed for members of that organization. "Each issue contains refereed articles on applied research, applications of current technology and general interest subjects for food safety professionals."
  • A website that lists and ranks 327 food science journals may provide good information. This website offers a list of food science magazines/journals published in countries including the US, the Netherlands, UK, Taiwan, Switzerland, New Zealand, Japan, Germany, Bangladesh, South Korea, and others. These are food SCIENCE publications, not trade publications, but they may be helpful.


Sources
Sources

Quotes
  • "Consumer demand for greater product innovation and transparency, ever-increasing quality and compliance pressures, tighter profit margins, new channel opportunities, and a dynamic workforce are just some of the factors that are shifting market dynamics to the point where food and beverage manufacturers need to take a fresh approach to how they do business."
  • "1. Innovation and transparency Whether it’s plant-based protein or CBD-infused foods, food and beverage manufacturers need to keep up with evolving consumer demand for new products to try, in greater varieties, along with healthier and better-tasting foods. But product innovation goes beyond keeping up with trends. It’s also about satisfying consumer demand for detailed information about products—such as where exactly the ingredients come from, or how environmentally friendly the product might be. While it’s important to label products with easy-to-understand and comprehensive information, there’s only so much that can fit. Food and beverage manufacturers need to use other means to reach consumers, such as mobile-friendly websites and smart labels. Of course, having a consumer-friendly means of information sharing is pointless without also being able to provide the specific information consumers are seeking."
  • "2. Quality and compliance Just as customer demand for new products and information continues to evolve, so does the landscape of quality and compliance. Food and beverage manufacturers must contend with label requirements that vary by both country of origin and where the products will be consumed. In addition to transforming from region to region, businesses also have to account for how regulations are evolving within those regions. Customers, consumers, and regulators expect food and beverage manufacturers to take a proactive and responsive approach to quality and recall management. In an age of instantaneous communication, it’s not unreasonable to envision a day when consumers will expect to be personally informed of recalls and outages in a timely manner, and told how to get replacement products."
  • "3. Margin pressures Due to its low barriers to entry, the food and beverage industry continues to draw new manufacturers to the marketplace. Due to increasing globalization, competition is expanding—leading to greater product proliferation and lower operating margins in many product categories. In addition, unexpected changes in seasonal supply or pricing can wreak havoc on a food and beverage manufacturer’s bottom line. But these new factors—which include customer expectations for faster response times, near-flawless order fill rates, and overwhelming numbers of products and SKUs—can stretch a company’s capabilities to the limits without the right infrastructure in place to keep up."
  • "4. Channel progression Customer loyalty and profits are heavily influenced by how and where products are sold. Like many industries, food and beverage is impacted by the proliferation of e-commerce channels. Consumers are embracing home delivery of groceries (such as with Amazon Fresh or FreshDirect), and physically picking up groceries from their local grocery store after ordering them online. Today’s food and beverage businesses need to plan around these evolving channels."
  • "5. Dynamic workforce Modern consumers expect modern shopping experiences, and embracing online channels while offering greater transparency is a wise choice in today’s marketplace. But it’s not just consumers who seek this level of engagement. Today’s employees also hold the same expectations from the companies they work for. They want user-friendly solutions, embedded analytics, mobile access, and artificial intelligence that can enable them to work in the ways they want to work and help them be more effective at their jobs. Leading food and beverage manufacturers recognize they can maximize employee productivity by creating a work environment in line with modern employee expectations. Transformative technology"
Quotes
  • "Food Safety Frozen vs. Canned and Preserved Good examples of such food trends include the direct use of frozen fruit in smoothies and frozen vegetables in salads without the benefit of any cooking. These products were originally introduced to ensure that cooks and bakers had seasonal ingredients needed all year long for their recipes which were either cooked or baked. Frozen produce was also considered a minimally processed alternative to their canned or preserved counterparts. These days however, restaurants and consumers in their homes use them from their raw frozen state which poses safety concerns since frozen produce is not classified as ready-to-eat (RTE) food. But, how many people actually know this?"
  • "Food Labeling With increasing public awareness regarding food-related health problems like obesity, diabetes and hypertension, food producers and manufacturers are under mounting public pressure to label their products accordingly. This is why trans fats and GMO labeling is already in force in some countries. Calorie counting among consumers and the influence of publications such as “Eat This, Not That” by David Zinczenko with Matt Goulding have also induced some restaurants to include caloric information on their menus or, at the very least, provide detailed nutritional information accessible to the public through their websites."
  • "Food Waste Restaurants, though generally considered to be a “clean industry,” still substantially contribute to the waste stream. Some restaurants have adopted recycling in terms of food packaging, and some fast food companies have reintroduced the use of non-disposable beverage and food containers for dine-in orders. However, the management of solid waste disposal remains a growing challenge as towns and cities remain ill-equipped to deal with the consequences of higher population density and urbanization."
Quotes
  • "1. The ‘Plastic ban’ The enforcement of the ‘plastic ban’ is rooted in an ideology that has lasted several years amid discussions on international platforms and has now come to fruition. The consistent growth pace of industrialization, of which the F&B sector is a major arm, has had a disastrous impact on the environment, and has led to eco-friendliness becoming the next big mantra out there. Knowingly or unknowingly, the excess consumption and improper disposal of plastic has come up as one of the major challenges faced by food and beverage managers today. In this scenario, a product that is tagged as ‘eco-friendly’, quite naturally, has more of a consumer connection and is likely to accrue lucrative sales than a product that is popularized to harm the environment. Food and beverage manufacturers and retailers are now striving toward making the food manufacturing process highly conducive to the environment through the adoption of numerous recycling practices. The deployment of green business practices – right from the production to the packaging and supply chain management is a crucial solution to tackling the current issues in the food industry. manufacturers have been striving to bring about eco-friendly manufacturing practices, waste management programs, recycling techniques, and more. A major example of how F&B industry contenders have been complying to the plastic ban is that of Nestle. Last year, Nestle declared its decision to use 100% recyclable/reusable packaging by 2025. Additionally, retailers such as Asda, Café Coffee Day, and McDonald’s have also announced their commitment to go plastic-free and bring about sustainable practices in production and packaging. "
  • "2. The rise of health-consciousness among consumers The increasing incidences of food-related disorders have prompted consumers to bring about vital changes in their diet and lifestyle, making them more health-conscious than ever. Automatically, the train of thought is diverted towards purchasing foods without added preservatives that might hamper one’s health. The demand for products that do not carry the ‘healthy’ label is then bound to reduce, and to stay at the top, the need to eliminate artificial constituents from products has come to the fore as one of the major challenges faced by food and beverage managers. One of the major factors that has led to increased diabetes prevalence is obesity, linked to a major intake of sugar via processed foods and cereals. This realization has, since the last half a decade, led to consumers shying away from products containing artificial sweeteners and other added preservatives. Thus, one of the biggest challenges of food and beverage industry is for manufacturers to come up with healthy products that provide ample nutrients; yet, at the same time, do not take away from the aesthetics of the brand. This has led to a variety of nutrient-rich foods making it to supermarket aisles, labelled ‘gluten-free’, ‘dairy-free’, ‘sugar-free’, and the like. The widespread expansion of food supplement ingredients market is an apt example justifying the aforesaid. As consumers tend to purchase products with value addition, food products reinforced with proteins, vitamins, and other nutrients have better chances of a massive sale, fueling food additives market, which is slated to register revenues over USD 115 billion by 2024. Adding value to food products without diminishing their quality or compromising on taste, and yet maintaining the cost-effectiveness, adds to the long list of current issues in the food industry. Yet another trend that forms the crux of the challenges faced by food and beverage managers is the rising demand for organic food. The drastic reduction in the demand for processed foods has fueled the organic food market, increasing awareness levels regarding natural foods and their positive health impact. This has favored the demand for natural, healthy, food products, pushing organic rice protein market trends."
  • "3. The rising concerns about product traceability Traceability is one of the pivotal challenges in food and beverage industry, not just for record management but also to fulfill the bottom line – generating revenue for every sector. Of late, consumers have been taking increasing interest to know what goes into their food, that has led ‘ingredient labelling’ forming a major part of the packaging process. Having recognized the significance of maintaining precise data records, food processing companies are now on their way to deploy advanced technology, such as IoT, AI, and the blockchain, for tasks such as supply chain analysis, weight measurement, temperature monitoring, etc. Say for example, global retail giant Auchan, toward the end of 2018, planned to expand TE-FOOD’s blockchain solution in a bid to improve food transparency."
  • "4. The ascent of meat-free & veganism trend The growing concern toward animals is ushering in a change in the food patterns of the masses. With more and more consumers vying for vegetarian and vegan products, the demand for meat and other products has observed a significant decline, posing as one of the major challenges in food and beverage industry. "
  • "5. The optimum level of stringency in the regulatory landscape While it may be construed as stating the obvious – the fact is, that the F&B space is very stringently governed by regulations. Organizations such as the FDA, EPA, OSHA, and FTC have been rather diligent in enforcing norms pertaining to the launch of healthy products, regulating food labels, maintaining a clean, hygienic environment, and the like. While most companies are known to perfunctorily adhere to the norms, the periodic changes subject to waste disposal, food quality, raw material, surplus production, documentation, etc., have cropped up to be one of the major challenges faced by food and beverage managers. Often, the continuously changing reforms have led to companies recalling food products from their stores. Say for instance, Tyson Foods recently recalled over 190,000 pounds of ready-to-eat chicken fritters post order from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), while grocery store chain Kroger recalled three frozen berry varieties after the FDA discovered that some of them tested positive for hepatitis A. In order to deal with the same, companies are required to bring about utmost accuracy and precision in their business operations – right from the manufacturing to the distribution processes."
  • "6. The increasing complications of inventory management Given the limited shelf life of food products, inventory management has come up to be one of the current issues in the food industry. The perishability factor is responsible for fact that F&B inventory is highly susceptible to foodborne pathogens and more, if not stored hygienically. This has prompted manufacturers to adopt new software to alleviate these issues, given that the presence of foodborne bacteria may have a disastrous impact on the company’s reputation. Amid this backdrop, food pathogen testing market will stand tall as one of the most profitable arms of the global F&B industry. The F&B space is also highly machine-controlled, given its expanding growth pace, and is likely to continue adopting advanced technology to keep up with consumer trends and latest innovations. The demand for enhanced inventory management software in food processing, canning goods, and packaging products forms a vital part of the challenges of food and beverage market, and numerous companies are making efforts to help the F&B sector deal with the crisis. Say for example, toward the end of 2018, United Overseas Bank declared that it has upsized UOB BizSmart – its cloud-based, integrated digital solution to help small business in the F&B industry. "
  • "7. The pervasive presence of eCommerce An online presence is one of the major challenges of food and beverage industry, considering that consumers are more tech-savvy and socially informed, thanks to the Internet. "
  • "8. The current impact & forecast aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic The F&B sector has faced the worst brunt of the coronavirus so far. Right from the manufacturing and supply chain and restaurant sector to food service companies and food delivery firms, the F&B industry has been wearily coping up with the pandemic. Countrywide lockdowns have prevented employees from working in factories, severely impacting the supply chain. With farming and agricultural activities taking a hit, the fear of food shortage looms large. Petrified with the extended lockdowns, it has been observed the masses resorted to panic buying, creating further food shortage and a major disparity between the ones who can afford to stockpile on items and the ones who cannot."
Quotes
  • "Health and wellness will continue to drive innovation. Brands will respond to combined consumer and research pressure with updated products, and by incorporating new ingredients into their existing range. Expect to see omegas, probiotics, and other gut-friendly foods in new products as well as reformulations. Also look for healthier ingredients incorporated into familiar products like bread and pizza bases, where they provide a small health boost in a familiar context."
  • "Traceable to origin Consumers are also increasingly concerned about the provenance of their food, manifesting as higher demand for information about where their ingredients come from. At one end of this spectrum are hyper-local supply chains: going back to our roots and using ingredients grown in the same country, county, or even neighbourhood. The appeal here is reduced air miles, and a general sense of participation in a greener route from field to fork. At the other end of the spectrum are technological solutions like blockchain, whose use allows precision-tracking of every ingredient in a supply chain. This is a way for established global supply chains to keep up with the demands of increasingly discerning consumers. Buzzwords for ingredients are another consumer-friendly way to address concerns about provenance. McDonalds' commitment to use only cage-free eggs by 2025 is an example of this, and can be interpreted as a bellwether for the willingness of big names in the industry to respond to consumer demands."
  • "Meat-free continues to expand market share "Almond milk and veggie burgers aren’t just for hippies anymore", say Bloomberg. As a result of the shifting consumer mindset mentioned previously, increasing attention is being paid to the environmental and ethical aspects of animal products. This is reflected in buying habits: plant-based food sales were up 20% in 2018; and non-dairy milk sales are up by 9% versus a 6% drop for cows' milk."
  • "Legalised it Expect to see cannabinoid oil (CBD) in food and beverages thanks to it being recently legalised in the US. Although the oil has been legal in the UK for a while, the change in legal status in the USA is likely to lead to brand mergers and product innovation. There are plenty of examples of this happening already. Molson Coors have joined with Hydropothecary Corp to release a cannabis-infused non-alcoholic drink for Canadian markets. Constellation Brands, a large drinks producer, bought a 9.9% stake in Canopy Growth Corporation, a Canadian cannabis producer. Blue Moon have announced a de-alcoholised cannabis-infused beer called Grainwave. We think this will continue."
Quotes
  • "1. Walmart Walmart has turned to blockchain technology to identify contaminated products to mere seconds. Its smart tracking program aims to also collect environmental data from end-to-end, across the food supply chain. First, they experimented with Chinese pork, to track the movements of it in China to prevent disease outbreaks linked to the food. Then they teamed up with other food giants to further develop their blockchain plans. As of September, Walmart requires all its suppliers of leafy green vegetable to upload their data on a blockchain. Each node in the network will be a supplier that handled the product, making the supply chain completely transparent."
  • "2. JD.com Last year, JD.com announced a blockchain platform to track beef imports from Australia. The Chinese e-commerce giant partnered with InterAgri to make the production process of Australian Angus beef fully traceable on a blockchain. The private blockchain solution enables Chinese citizens to know that they can trust the quality of the imported product. Consumers can trace each piece of steak back to the farm in Australia. In addition, consumers will receive a lot of additional information. This includes details of the animal, its rearing, the processing of the meat and transportation"
  • "3. Carrefour In March 2018, Carrefour launched a blockchain initiative to trace its chickens, tomatoes, eggs, milk, salmon and cheese. Apart from ensuring additional transparency and safety for consumers, the blockchain project also aimed to act as a showcase for suppliers. If consumers appreciated the food from a particular supplier, it might go back to that supplier. The objective of the project is to record information on how, for example, a chicken was reared, what food it ate, the medication that was used and where it lived on a blockchain, thereby making it immutable. This offers consumers guarantees about product origin and quality. So far, Carrefour has been experimenting with Ethereum as well as Hyperledger Fabric. Consumers only have to scan a QR code on the product to get access to a range of extra information, which they can be certain of that is correct."
  • "4. Albert Heijn The Dutch supermarket chain Albert Heijn started their blockchain experiments in 2018. Together with the Refresco, they put orange juice on the blockchain. The objective of the project was to make it fully transparent how orange juice moved from the farm in Brazil to the consumer’s kitchen. During transport, they take samples from the orange juice to ensure quality. The results are then stored on a blockchain. Using a QR code, consumers can see the exact route and the quality of their orange juice. However, the project offers less transparency than claimed. Research from the Dutch newspaper Trouw revealed that the working conditions at one of the orange farms of Refresco’s parent company, Louis Dreyfus, are deplorable. Staff had to sleep in a former chicken coop and had to work too hard for a very low salary. Unfortunately, this information was not available to the consumers who scanned the QR code. Since then, Albert Heijn has collaborated with Capgemini to achieve a paperless supply chain and reduce efficiencies:"
  • "5. Plantaza Plataza is a vineyard in Montenegro that produces 22 million kilos of grapes annually and sells more than 16 million bottled products in over 40 countries in the world. In 2018, the vineyard worked together with OriginTrail and TagItSmart to track over 15.000 unique wine bottles and prevent counterfeiting. Unfortunately, wine counterfeiting is a serious problem. It is estimated that in China, which is the world’s 5th largest wine consumer, as much as 50% of the wine is either fake or mislabelled to deceive consumers. Many of these wines are mixed with a variety of dangerous additives that can be detrimental to your health. Recording unique wine bottles on a blockchain ensures consumers that the wine is safe to drink. Using a QR code and photochromic ink, Plantaza has been able to ensure the veracity and authenticity of origin for each bottle."
  • "6. Nestle This week, Nestle announced a new blockchain proof of concept to track products from their New Zealand origin to Nestle’s Middle Eastern factories. The project is to go live later this year. Nestle will use a public blockchain to offer consumers full transparency on how products moved through the supply chain. It is the first major food and beverage company to use a public, permissionless, blockchain to ensure traceability of their products. Benjamin Ware, global head of responsible sourcing at Nestlé, said: “This open blockchain technology will allow anyone, anywhere in the world to assess our responsible sourcing facts and figures.” Nestle first starts with dairy products from New Zealand but later will add palm oil from the Americas."
  • "7. Bumble Bee Foods Bumble Bee Foods is an American company that offers canned salmon, tuna, other seafood and chicken. This year, the company started experimenting with recording yellowfin tuna on a blockchain to increase traceability and transparency and prevent mislabelling and fraud. When consumers scan a QR code, they receive insights on where the tuna originated, which community caught it, the size of the catch, and how it came to be certified as fair trade. Bumble Bee Foods uses a private blockchain developed by SAP. Using distributed ledger technology, every participant in a supply chain has access to real-time data. This data is immutable, traceable and verifiable. Eventually, this ensures trust that the canned tuna is safe to eat. Since its launch, it has received overwhelming positivity from retailers."
Quotes
  • "Albertsons Companies, the second-largest grocer in the U.S., has announced that it is joining the IBM Food Trust network that runs on a blockchain framework, in an attempt to increase transparency and visibility into its supply chain. The IBM Food Trust network is a consortium that comprises more than 50 food brands from across the world. Their common interest is to trace food production from farm to the storefronts. "
  • "The pilot run for the blockchain solution on IBM Food Trust is to trace bulk romaine lettuce from one of Albertsons distribution centers, which if successful, would be expanded to other food categories across its distribution network. "
  • "Choosing romaine lettuce is understandable. The food product was the center of a major recall last year, with contaminated romaine lettuce carrying the dreaded E.coli bacteria ending up sickening hundreds of people over the course of two months. Apart from the obvious health hazards, contamination is also a significant business risk, because grocery retailers are forced to recall several hundred tons of food products because of the potential pathogen outbreak. "
Quotes
  • "COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.– Bytable Inc., in partnership with Farmers Hen House, will be nationally debuting the first ever traceable food product using a public blockchain this April. Beginning early to mid-April, consumers who pick up a carton of Farmers Hen House eggs in grocery stores nationwide will be able to scan a QR code to see exactly what Midwestern farm their eggs came from. After scanning, consumers input two numbers from their carton to generate a product record specific to that carton. From there, consumers can learn more about the specific farmer who helped get those eggs into their grocery cart, including real photos of their farm, the certifications and agriculture practices they follow, and even learn about their hobbies and family lives."
  • "By working directly with responsible producers, Bytable goes further than providing traceable software solutions – they work hand-in-hand with producers to sell their ethical and regenerative products directly to consumers with e-commerce, fulfillment, and processing solutions. “We welcome any responsible food producers to work with us, large or small, who are willing to put their supply chain information in front of the public. We currently specialize in animal products and are expanding to products that have particularly concerning supply chain issues like coffee, chocolate, and spices,” said Rittmer."
  • "The completely traceable Farmers Hen House cartons will be available in Whole Foods, Target, HyVee, and multiple independent retailers nationwide. Bytable was recently awarded a $463k grant from the USDA to continue their mission of building transparent food systems for ethical and regenerative foods."
  • "Bytable is a Colorado-based company that makes food traceable and transparent. They create trustworthy data chains that track products from farm to fork using blockchain technology. By creating traceable and transparent supply chains for food, they give consumers the information they need to make the right choice about the food they buy and the companies they support."
Quotes
  • "One of the most notable developments comes from IBM and their Food Trust initiative developed on the IBM Blockchain platform powered by Hyperledger Fabric. Since its inception in August 2017 the private network has expanded to more than 80 members and has tracked over 1300 products so far. Some of largest partners that are increasing their food safety and reducing food waste are Driscoll’s, McLane, Kroger and Tyson."
  • "The key drivers for supply chain blockchain adoption are increased cost savings, enhanced traceability and greater transparency. This means a lot even for giants like Walmart, Carrefour, Nestle and Dole, all of which are part of IBM’s Food Trust provenance project."
Quotes
  • "Walmart is currently making use of blockchain technology to create a food traceability system based on the Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger Fabric. Along with IBM, the retail giant has already tested two proof-of-concept projects to examine its envisioned system. "
  • "The first project deals actively with tracing the origins of the mangoes being sold across Walmart’s stores in the United States, while the other seeks to trace the pork meat being sold via the company’s different Chinese outlets. From an efficiency perspective, the research team at Walmart claims that by making use of this new system, the time needed to trace the firm’s provenance has dropped from seven days to just 2.2 seconds."
  • "The point of highlighting this information is that any time an outbreak of this magnitude occurs, it usually takes authorities days (or even weeks) to find the source of the problem. However, enhanced traceability — that can be obtained through the use of blockchain-based ledgers — can save a lot of lives by allowing health care professionals to act more swiftly and protect the livelihoods of farmers by discarding the limited produce that may have come from affected pieces of farmland."
  • "Now, the company claims that because of Walmart’s Hyperledger Fabric-powered blockchain system, the firm has the ability to trace the origins of over 25 products from five different suppliers. In this regard, the firm has even announced that it will soon be requiring all of its vegetable suppliers to adopt this new system so as to enhance operational transparency as well as internal accountability."
Quotes
  • "The Canadian division of Walmart has launched a blockchain-based supply chain that includes freight tracking and payment processing for 70 trucking companies whose goods are transported to more than 400 retail stores. The system is now live and all of Walmart Canada's third-party freight carriers are scheduled to be on the network by Feb. 1, 2020, the company said in a statement. Walmart claims the blockchain network is the largest of its kind in the world, a claim not disputed by industry analysts."
  • "For example, TradeLens is a blockchain-based supply chain launched by Maersk and IBM with more than 100 participants. Those participants include four of the world's largest ocean carriers, three inland carriers and 61 ports around the globe. But for all its participants, it purportedly has only 14 blockchain distributed nodes. Meanwhile, Cisco runs a track-and-trace system for hundreds of its suppliers worldwide, reportedly with 12 nodes. Walmart's new private blockchain, in contrast, has 27 distributed nodes, some of them on premise, others in the cloud – provided by a blockchain vendor. "It probably is the largest," said Avivah Litan, a Gartner vice president of research."
  • "The distributed ledger network, called DL Asset Track, was created by Walmart and its tech partner, Toronto-based DLT Labs. The system automates the tracking of freight shipments and invoice creation; it uses IoT sensors and GPS tracking in semi-trailer trucks as well as a web portal and a mobile app where information can be input manually by operators and suppliers."
  • "The blockchain ensures accuracy because variable information, such as transport time input by freight truckers, is matched against IoT and GPS tracking data automatically uploaded to the blockchain ledger in real time."
  • "Walmart's blockchain network will eliminate the need for third-party invoice creation and reduce both processing time, and – perhaps more importantly – invoice disputes and reconciliation. From 50% to 75% of all invoices experience some form of dispute that requires resolution, and those disputes can take weeks or even up to two months to resolve, according to Louden Owen, CEO of DLT Labs."
  • "Walmart Canada operates 8.75 million square feet of distribution center and moves more than 853 million cases of merchandise a year. The goods are transported by a by a third-party fleet and Walmart Canada's own collection of 180 tractors, 2,000 trailers and more than 350 drivers. Each third-party trailer tracks approximately 200 data points per shipment. Automating the data collection and management using blockchain can result in a significant cost-saving, the company said."
  • "This is not Walmart's first foray into blockchain-based track-and-trace systems. U.S.-based Walmart and Sam's Club have asked all their suppliers to come on board an IBM-based blockchain supply chain system for tracking produce from farm to shelf. That project, however, is a proof-of-concept restricted to the shipment of some farm produce, while DL Asset Track will literally track every shipment to Walmart's Canadian stores."
Quotes
  • "BERLIN (Reuters) - French retailer Carrefour SA has seen sales boosted by the use of blockchain ledger technology to track meat, milk and fruit from farms to stores and will extend it to more products to increase shopper trust, an executive said on Monday."
  • "Blockchain’s digital tracking technology allows customers to see detailed information on products like when it was harvested or packed - reassuring them on the quality of items they buy and allowing them to avoid products with genetically modified organisms, antibiotics or pesticides if they want."
  • "Carrefour has launched blockchain information for 20 items including chicken, eggs, raw milk, oranges, pork and cheese, and will add 100 more this year with a focus on areas where consumers want reassurance, like baby and organic products."
  • "Carrefour is among several leading companies tapping into the growing use of blockchain to track where products come from, as consumers increasingly look to ensure that products meet standards on ethics and general safety. Carrefour has worked on the blockchain system together with IBM, which is collaborating with a number of retailers, logistics firms and growers on systems to track and secure their global supply chains."
  • "Customers can scan a QR barcode on a pomelo grapefruit with their phone and find out the date of harvest, location of cultivation, the owner of the plot, when it was packed, how long it took to transport to Europe and tips on how to prepare it."
  • "Carrefour wants to add non-food lines in future like clothing, as well as more information, such as how much the farmer gets out of the shelf price. It is also experimenting with ways to identify products that do not rely on a QR code."
Quotes
  • "In the fall of 2018, leading shelf-stable seafood provider Bumble Bee Foods began utilizing blockchain technology to track products all the way through its supply chain. The brand has seen significant success from harnessing the abilities housed within the cutting edge technology. "We've had nothing but overwhelming positive feedback from the industry and retailers," Bumble Bee Foods senior vice-president and CIO Tony Costa told me in an interview."
  • ""The blockchain project has focused around the handline fisheries in Indonesia," he noted. The project is underway for Bumble Bee's Natural Blue line, which is part of its Anova brand. Bumble Bee's blockchain incorporation uses the technology to track its products from fishers to end consumers, ensuring aspects such as data accuracy and tracking all the way through the supply chain. The beef and grain industries saw similar blockchain application for supply chain with BeefChain and GrainChain."
  • "February's launch involved "putting QR codes on the back of packages," as well as automating "the implementation of the data into the blockchain [...] for an entire handline yellowfin tuna supply chain in Indonesia," Costa said."
  • "Bumble Bee has seen notable success across the board as a result of its work with blockchain. On the customer side, buyers can scan a QR code on the packaging and find details such as the location and method of that fish's capture, Costa explained. "From that aspect, it's been a great implementation, very successful.""
Quotes
  • "One of the largest branded shelf-stable seafood companies in North America has partnered with SAP to become the first food company to incorporate SAP blockchain technology into its production. Bumble Bee Foods announced in a statement that it has implemented the SAP Cloud Platform Blockchain service into its production to trace the journey of yellowfin tuna from the Indonesian ocean right to the customer’s dinner table."
  • "The blockchain technology will allow consumers and customers alike to access information as the to the origin and supply chain journey of Bumble Bee Food’s Natural Blue by Annova yellowfin tuna through the use of smartphones and QR codes on product packaging. This will provide them with real-time information surrounding the size of the catch, point of capture and the fishing community that caught it. SAP’s blockchain technology enables greater authenticity, traceability, safety, fair trade fishing certification and sustainability right through the supply chain."
Quotes
  • "TRACE MY CATCH Bumble Bee started its consumer-focused "Trace My Catch" supply chain visibility program in 2015 with its core product, albacore tuna. It eventually extended the program to its salmon and sardine product lines."
  • "At the Trace My Catch section of Bumble Bee's website, consumers input a code from the can or pouch. The site retrieves a long list of information specific to the product including: fish species, fishing method, the ocean where the fish was caught, vessel names and countries, fishing trip dates, and processing location. The long tail of traceability back to the point of origin is a growing concern among consumers, who began questioning where their food comes from and holding food companies responsible for their supply chain practices."
  • "In parallel to this external uptick in corporate social responsibility momentum, Bumble Bee took a look internally and decided to overhaul its supply chain operations in Fiji, one of the company's prime areas of tuna supply. Through this effort, Bumble Bee was able to capture greater amounts of sourcing data, which started the ripple effect of more efficient reporting, better information-gathering techniques, and increased supply chain visibility—much of which could be served up to consumers via the catch-to-can website."
  • "So, in 2014, when Bumble Bee acquired Florida-based Anova Food and began integrating it into the fold, it was clear to company executives that Anova's Natural Blue frozen line would also be included in the company's track-and-trace footprint, but with better technology. "This all started as a supply chain visibility and optimization project," Costa says. "When we acquired Anova, we knew we wanted to expand it to include the Natural Blue product line as well." During the past few years, Costa visited remote villages in Indonesia, one of the sources of yellowfin tuna, to see how the fish were being caught and how it moved through the processing plant, seafood inspection and health safety facility, and then into a finished good."
  • "In fact, Bumble Bee is the first food company to incorporate SAP blockchain technology into its production."
  • ""Bumble Bee has been able to track and trace across its supply chain for a while, but blockchain brings it to the next level," Howells says. "When you don't own the whole of your supply chain and rely on many partners to provide data, blockchain secures the integrity and authenticity of the data from multiple sources, without compromising their private information.""
  • "By the end of 2019, Costa expected blockchain to have been used to track and trace 800,000 cases of yellowfin tuna products. To date, Anova's Natural Blue fair trade-certified ahi tuna steaks are found in several retail chains, including Albertsons, Hy-Vee, Price Chopper, and Safeway. Bumble Bee also plans to roll out the blockchain solution to its supply chain practices in Thailand and Vietnam, and Costa sees potential for it to be used across the company's entire product portfolio. By November 2019, some of Vietnam's suppliers were using blockchain on select products, and Thailand was expected to come on board by the end of 2019 or in early 2020. "The goal is to quickly get this out to the rest of Indonesia, and then bring it to other regions," Costa says. "Technology, in this case, is not limiting supply chain participation. It's getting everyone to contribute.""
  • "Editor's Note: In November 2019, Bumble Bee Foods filed for bankruptcy protection in the wake of mounting debt related to a 2017 federal price-fixing case and agreed to sell its assets to Taiwan's FCF Fishery Co. for roughly $925 million. As of press time, the company was operating as usual and the SAP project was in full effect."
  • "A collaborative project between Bumble Bee, SAP, the Indonesia government and Ministry of Fishery, and a nongovernmental organization MDPI (Yayasan Masyarakat dan Perikanan Indonesia) focused on achieving responsible and sustainable fisheries activities in Indonesia."
Quotes
  • "Whole genome sequencing (WGS) provides detailed genetic information about germs that make people sick. CDC’s Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases uses this information to improve efforts to find, investigate, and prevent illnesses caused by bacteria, fungi, and parasites. This is especially important when looking for the source of an outbreak or predicting drug resistance in bacteria and fungi. WGS provides highly detailed and timely information that helps CDC and other government agencies protect the public’s health."
  • "The results from WGS help investigators determine which ill people are part of an outbreak by precisely comparing the DNA of the foodborne bacteria making people sick."
  • "CDC began using WGS to investigate foodborne disease outbreaks in 2013 with Listeria — bacteria that cause a severe illness that is fatal in 1 of every 5 cases. CDC uses WGS to investigate all outbreaks caused by foodborne bacteria. CDC and its partners in all 50 states use the same WGS methods and technology to detect, investigate, and stop foodborne outbreaks."
  • "Federal agencies use whole genome sequencing to detect and investigate foodborne disease outbreaks through two networks: PulseNet, a laboratory network managed by CDC; focuses on bacteria from sick people. GenomeTrakrexternal icon, a database of foodborne bacteria managed by FDA; focuses on germs from food products and the environment."
Quotes
  • "When two or more people get the same illness and investigation shows it came from the same contaminated food or drink, the event is called a foodborne disease outbreak."
  • "In 2017, CDC monitored between 18 and 37 potential food poisoning or related clusters each week, and investigated nearly 200 multistate clusters. These investigations identified confirmed or suspected vehicles of transmission. They also led to recalls of foods including soy nut butter, soft raw milk cheeses, and imported papayas."
  • "2020 Bagged Salad Mix – Cyclospora Enoki Mushrooms – Listeria monocytogenes Clover Sprouts – E. coli O103"
  • "2019 Hard-boiled Eggs – Listeria monocytogenes Cut Fruit – Salmonella Javiana Fresh Express Sunflower Crisp Chopped Salad Kits – E. coli O157:H7 Romaine Lettuce – E. coli O157:H7 Ground Beef – Salmonella Dublin Listeria monocytogenes Infections Fresh Basil from Siga Logistics de RL de CV of Morelos, Mexico – Cyclospora (2019) Northfork Bison – E. coli O103 and O121 Papayas – Salmonella Uganda Flour – E. coli O26 Karawan Brand Tahini – Salmonella Concord Raw Oysters – Multiple Pathogens Deli-Sliced Meats and Cheeses – Listeria monocytogenes Frozen Raw Tuna – Salmonella Newport Pre-Cut Melon – Salmonella Carrau Ground Beef – E. coli O103 Butterball Brand Ground Turkey – Salmonella Schwarzengrund"
Quotes
  • "As of January 15, 2020, this outbreak appears to be over. Contaminated romaine lettuce that made people sick in this outbreak harvested from the Salinas Valley growing region in California is no longer available for sale. CDC is no longer advising that people avoid romaine lettuce from this growing region. A total of 167 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 were reported from 27 states. A total of 85 hospitalizations were reported, including 15 people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. No deaths were reported. Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicated that romaine lettuce from the Salinas Valley growing region in California was contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 and made people sick."
  • "Illnesses started on dates ranging from September 20, 2019, to December 21, 2019. Ill people ranged in age from less than 1 to 89 years, with a median age of 27. Sixty-four percent of ill people were female. Of 165 ill people with information available, 85 (52%) hospitalizations were reported, including 15 people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure. No deaths were reported."
  • "Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicated that romaine lettuce from the Salinas Valley growing region in California was the likely source of this outbreak."
  • "The Maryland Department of Healthexternal icon identified the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 in an unopened package of Ready Pac Foods Bistro® Chicken Caesar Salad collected from a sick person’s home in Maryland. The Wisconsin Department of Health Servicesexternal icon identified the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 in an unopened bag of Fresh Express® Leafy Green Romaine collected from an ill person’s home in Wisconsin. The Salinas Valley growing region in California was the main source of the romaine lettuce in both products."
  • " In this investigation, WGS showed that bacteria isolated from ill people were closely related genetically. This means that people in this outbreak were more likely to share a common source of infection. WGS also showed that this outbreak was caused by the same strain of E. coli O157:H7 that caused outbreaks linked to leafy greens in 2017 and to romaine lettuce in 2018."
Quotes
  • "As of June 19, 2019, this outbreak appears to be over. A total of 209 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O103 were reported from 10 states. Twenty-nine people were hospitalized. Two cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure, were reported. No deaths were reported."
  • "Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicated that ground beef was the likely source of this outbreak. Ill people in this outbreak reported eating ground beef at home and in restaurants. The outbreak strain of E. coli O103 was identified in a sample of ground beef collected from a location where ill people reported eating. Traceback investigations of beef eaten by ill people were completed. A common supplier of ground beef to grocery stores and other locations where ill people reported eating was not identified."
  • "Two companies recalled ground beef products that were sold to restaurants and institutions because they may have been contaminated with E. coli O103. Ill people in this outbreak ate ground beef from many sources. No single supplier, distributor, or brand of ground beef was identified that could account for all of the illnesses."
  • "A total of 209 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O103 were reported from 10 states. A list of the states and the number of confirmed cases in each can be found on the Map of Reported Cases page. Illnesses started on dates from March 1, 2019, to May 1, 2019. Ill people ranged in age from less than 1 year to 84 years, with a median age of 18. Fifty-one percent were female. Of 191 people with information available, 29 (15%) were hospitalized. Two cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome were reported. No deaths were reported."
  • "This multistate investigation began on March 28, 2019, when officials in Kentucky and Georgia notified CDC of this outbreak. Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicated that ground beef was the likely source of this outbreak."
  • "USDA-FSIS and state regulatory officials collected products for testing at retailers and establishments, and all products tested were negative for E. coli. USDA-FSIS conducted traceback investigations to determine the source of ground beef supplied to grocery stores and restaurants where ill people ate. Ill people in this outbreak ate ground beef from many sources. No single supplier, distributor, or brand of ground beef was identified."
Quotes
  • "CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigated a multistate outbreak of E. coli O103 infections linked to clover sprouts."
  • "As of April 22, 2020, this outbreak appears to be over. 51 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O103 were reported from 10 states. 3 people were hospitalized. No deaths were reported. Epidemiologic, traceback, and laboratory evidence indicated that clover sprouts were the source of this outbreak. On March 16, 2020, Chicago Indoor Garden recalled external icon all products containing red clover sprouts. More information about this recall is available on the FDA website. Jimmy John’s LLC reported that all of its restaurants stopped serving clover sprouts on February 24, 2020."
  • "A total of 51 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O103 were reported from 10 states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Map of Reported Cases. Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 6, 2020, to March 15, 2020. Ill people ranged in age from 1 to 79 years, with a median age of 29 years. Fifty-five percent of ill people were female. Of 41 ill people with information available, 3 were hospitalized and no deaths were reported."
  • "Epidemiologic, traceback, and laboratory evidence indicated that clover sprouts were the source of this outbreak. In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures they had in the week before their illness started. Eighteen (56%) of 32 people interviewed reported eating sprouts. This percentage is significantly higher than results from a survey pdf icon[PDF – 787 KB] of healthy people in which 8% reported eating sprouts in the week before they were interviewed. Seventeen (63%) of 27 people interviewed reported eating sprouts at a Jimmy John’s restaurant. Jimmy John’s LLC reported that all of their restaurants stopped serving clover sprouts on February 24, 2020. Clover sprouts are no longer available at Jimmy John’s restaurants."
  • "Additionally, FDA identified the outbreak strain of E. coli O103 in samples of Chicago Indoor Garden products that contain sprouts. On March 16, 2020, Chicago Indoor Garden recalled external icon all products containing red clover sprouts. WGS analysis of isolates from 39 ill people was performed FDA’s traceback investigation external icon showed that a common seed lot was used to grow both the sprouts recalled by Chicago Indoor Garden and sprouts that were served at some Jimmy John’s locations. The same seed lot was also used to grow sprouts linked to an outbreak of the same strain of E. coli O103 infections in 2019. As of April 22, 2020, this outbreak appears to be over."
Quotes
  • "Food Safety Magazine Food Safety MagazineAbout Blog Bimonthly magazine for science-based solutions for food safety & quality assurance professionals worldwide. The mission is to help all levels of food safety decision makers and practitioners in food manufacturing/ processing, foodservice/retail, regulatory and food science acquire state-of-the-art knowledge to align food safety science and technology with business strategies that optimize the efficiencies and effectiveness of food safety systems across the entire supply chain from farm to fork. foodsafetymagazine.com "
  • " Food Quality & Safety Magazine Food Quality & Safety MagazineHoboken, NJAbout Blog Food Quality & Safety magazine is a Wiley publication, one of the world's foremost academic and professional publishers and largest society publisher. The established authority in delivering strategic and tactical approaches necessary for quality assurance, safety, and security in the food and beverage industry. foodsafetyandquality.com "
Quotes
  • "First published in 1937, the Journal of Food Protection® includes refereed scientific research and authoritative review articles on a variety of food safety and protection topics. JFP is the leading publication in the field of food microbiology and remains the premiere journal dedicated to food safety. The journal is published by the International Association for Food Protection which is supported by the largest food science community. https://meridian.allenpress.com/jfp/issue/browse-by-year"
Quotes
  • "Healthy Eating Canada’s food guide Canada's Dietary Guidelines for Health Professionals and Policy Makers Healthy eating recommendations Food guide snapshot History of Canada's Food Guides from 1942 to 2007 Food, Nutrients and Health: Interim Evidence Update 2018 Evidence Review for Dietary Guidance: Summary of Results and Implications for Canada's Food Guide 2015 Sodium Intake of Canadians in 2017"
Quotes
  • "The Ministry of Food and Drug Safety established a food safety management system to provide safer food. Domestic foods are managed through three stages: manufacturing, distribution, and consumption. In the manufacturing stage, the business operator must first submit a food manufacturing and item manufacturing report. In the manufacturing stage, self-quality inspections are conducted to ensure safety of products, and the HACCP system is applied to protect food from any hazardous risk in a preemptive manner. In the distribution stage, food products are collected and inspected to strengthen safe food distribution, and the food traceability system is operated to trace the distribution routes of harmful foods, along with the operation of the Hazardous Food Sales Prevention System. In the consumption stage, false or exaggerated advertisements are monitored and consumer food sanitation guard system is operated."
Quotes
  • "SGS magazine, published in Switzerland, covers South Korea, Japan, and other nations on the issue of food safety. sgs.com"
Quotes
  • "sgsgroup.kr contains articles about food safety in South Korea."
Quotes
  • "https://www.magzter.com/publishers/China-Food-Safety-Magazine no information available"
Quotes
  • "Food Safety is a peer-reviewed open-access online journal of English published quarterly by the Food Safety Commission of Japan (FSCJ). Since the first issue was published in December of 2013, this journal has been regularly published on broad fields of sciences on food-related risk assessments. See more details at: https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/browse/foodsafetyfscj別ウインドウで開きます(外部サイト) Archive in PMC: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/journals/3675/別ウインドウで開きます(外部サイト) "
  • "The aim of the publication of Food Safety is to is to gather and disseminate scientific and technological information in the field of food safety on human health, and thereby facilitate the development of science and technology for risk assessments of foods. The journal publishes Original Article, Short Communication, and Review covering broad areas of food safety related to the risk assessment of foods as well as risk assessments conducted by FSCJ. The scope of Food Safety covers broad aspects of food safety issues. (1) studies on risk assessments of biological, chemical, or physical agents concerning food safety; (2) occurrence of biological, chemical, or physical agents in the food chain with emphasis on human exposure; (3) epidemiology or control of food-borne illnesses; and (4) safety evaluation of novel foods including nanomaterials, genetically modified organisms, etc. We are grateful to the contributors for supporting the publication of the journal, which will advance the development of science and technology for food safety."
  • "Since the first issue was published in December of 2013, four regular issues have been regularly published on J-STAGE1) in March, June, September, and December of each year."
Quotes
  • "First Expert Meeting on Trade Facilitation Through an APEC Framework on Food Safety Modernisation Ha Noi, Viet Nam 15-17 November 2017 Current Situation & Challenges for food safety modernisation or enhancement"
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  • "Food hygiene and sanitary conditions are important public health concerns, especially in countries such as Thailand, where food businesses have been growing rapidly. The growth of the restaurant industry has led to increased hiring of migrant food handlers. Microbiological contamination of ice and non-food items, along with inappropriate food hygiene practices, are among the main factors leading to foodborne illnesses and outbreaks. The objectives of this study were to screen qualitatively for coliform bacterial contamination and determine food hygiene practices among migrant food handlers in restaurants. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Samut Sakhon province, Thailand, which is one of the provinces with the highest number of migrants."
Quotes
  • "This is an article describing the situation of food safety in Brazil today."
Quotes
  • "For over two decades New Food has been the prominent thought leadership platform for the food and beverage industry. By providing an unrivalled resource for industry professionals to discuss the challenges and wider economic issues that currently face the international food and beverage supply chain, New Food’s overarching aim is to explore solutions and catalyse industry progress."
  • "ABC audited, New Food magazine is distributed bi-monthly to 12,000* key decision makers throughout Europe. New Food is published by: Russell Publishing Ltd. Court Lodge Hogtrough Hill Brasted, Kent, TN16 1NU United Kingdom"
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  • "FoodEurope magazine is the quarterly publication for the latest news, technologies, trends and innovations in the food and beverage marketplace within Europe and the Americas. Food Europe has been published for ten years and has gained a significant reputation within the industry for the breadth and quality of its content and design."
  • "Food Europe publishes both technical and non-technical articles. Whilst we do not have the resources to translate our magazine into multiple languages, we try to ensure the highest quality plain English that is understandable throughout Europe."
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  • "Food Protection Trends is the general Membership publication by the International Association for Food Protection. Each issue contains refereed articles on applied research, applications of current technology and general interest subjects for food safety professionals. Regular features include industry and association news, an industry-related products section and a calendar of meetings, seminars and workshops. The publication also features government regulations, updates and sanitary design. Food Protection Trends is read by over 9,000 individuals around the world and is indexed in Agricola, FSTA, CAB Abstracts, ProQuest and Ebsco."
Quotes
  • "This website offers a list of food science magazines/journals published internationally in countries including the US, the Netherlands, UK, Taiwan, Switzerland, New Zealand, Japan, Germany, Bangladesh, South Korea, and others. These are food SCIENCE publications, not trade publications, but they may be helpful."