Food Prep Demographics

Part
01
of four
Part
01

Eco-Conscious Consumer Demographics

Based on various studies and surveys, it was found that millennial consumers in the US are more eco-conscious and interested in sustainable living than any other generations. Since demographic data specific to eco-conscious consumers are limited, information relevant to millennials were used to reflect the demographics for eco-conscious consumers in the US. Provided below are the findings.

AGE

  • Ninety percent of millennials prefer eco-friendly products and brands, and would pay more for these products compared to other generations.
  • People aged 55 and above are also more inclined to be eco-conscious.

GENDER

EDUCATION

  • Thirty-six percent of millennial women have, at minimum, a bachelor's degree.
  • On the other hand, 29% of millennial men have earned at least a bachelor's degree.

HOUSEHOLD INCOME

  • In 2016, the median household income of millennials was $72,500.

MARITAL STATUS, RESIDENCE, EMPLOYMENT

  • Majority of those people considered as green consumers are married, employed, and homeowners.
  • Specifically, 56% of them are married, 63% are employed, and 67% are homeowners.
  • Consumers living with children aged 18 and below are more eco-conscious and interested in sustainable living than those consumers without children under 18.

OCCUPATION


Research Strategy:

The research started by looking for precompiled demographic data for eco-conscious consumers on websites and research reports, such as MarketResearch, Statista, Inc, Deloitte, Forbes, MarketWatch, PR Newswire, Business Insider, New York Times, ResearchGate, MDPI, Academia.edu, Forbes, and Springer. Most of the information found were related to psychographic details and also not specific to US. We then focused on consumer profile of leading eco-friendly companies as well as information from environmental agencies, such as Greenpeace, Co-Op America, Patagonia, and GreenIdeal. However, we did not find relevant results from this strategy since these sources only talked about their initiatives and approaches, and nothing specific to profile eco-conscious consumers. As a last resort, we tried to locate demographic information related to eco-conscious millennials since they were initially identified as the generation most inclined to be eco-conscious consumers. However, nothing specific to eco-conscious millennials was retrieved.

As all the above strategies did not yield fruitful results, we used the general demographic information of millenials in the US as proxy to reflect data on the education, household income, and occupation of eco-conscious consumers.

Part
02
of four
Part
02

Lifestyle Consumer Demographics

Detailed research fails to uncover demographics for the United States consumers who are into "cool food" and lifestyle gadgets, as well as their new lifestyle trends. According to a 2019 Rewards Network Establishment Services Inc. publication, a significant number of baby boomers and about 90% of all recent American mothers are millennials that want to enjoy "cool food" in the company of their young children. While baby boomers are most likely to be found at the top of households in terms of wealth and spending on food, the millennial is a tech-savvy activist.

US CONSUMER DEMOGRAPHICS OF THOSE INTO COOL FOOD: THEIR LIFESTYLE GADGET AND LIFESTYLE TRENDS

  • Detailed research reveals that the United States consumers who are into cool food and lifestyle gadgets, as well as new lifestyle trends are most likely to be:
  • One of the 90% of all recent American mothers that are millennials and the older baby boomers. These parents are most likely to be among the category that wants to enjoy "cool food" along with their young children.
  • A combination of millennials and baby boomers representing about 58% of American consumers known to be driving some significant trends in the food industry, including the demand for "cool food."
  • One among the millennials and baby boomers known to have a craving for comfort foods (that have nostalgic or sentimental values).
  • One of the 18–34 year-old comfort foods lovers preferring ice cream by 77% of those aged and cookies preferred by 70%.
  • Aged 55 years and above preferring soup and mashed potatoes at 76% and 74% respectively.
  • One of the baby boomers most likely at "the top" pertaining household wealth and spends more on food.
  • One among the millennials more likely to be a tech-savvy activists.
  • One of the 66% of male boomers often playing games on their PC regularly.
  • One of the 69% of male millennials playing games on their game console regularly.
  • An American millennial that definitely owns a phone with 94% chances of owning a smartphone.
  • An American with 94 % chances of owning a phone, and 73% likely to own a smartphone.
  • An American, aged 65+, 85% likely to own a type of phone, and 46% likely to own a smartphone.
  • An American baby boomer or millennial that has a flair for ethnic cuisines made up of those born between the mid-1940s to mid-1960s, and also those born within the period from early 1980s till 2000 and desiring to eat the kinds of cuisines that he/she has "never tried before."
  • One of the 22% of the American female boomers that have been playing games for over five years.
  • One of the 58% of female boomers most likely to play a game on their smartphone.
  • An American, increasingly being connected to the "world of digital information" as he/she moves around via smartphones and other mobile devices in contrast to the fixed internet access he/she enjoyed in the early 2000s.
  • A millennial with six-in-tenchances (57%) of been never married.
  • One among millennial women with 72% chances of being employed.
  • One among millennials having bachelor’s degree or more as well as a full-time job with a median annual earning of $56,000 as of 2018.
  • One among millennials with a median household income approximately $71,400 as of 2018.
  • A baby boomer with a median household income of $70,690 as of 2016.
  • A female millennial with 36% chances of having a college degree as of 2017.
  • A female baby boomer with over 20% chances of having a college degree.
  • A male millennial with 29% chances of having a college degree as of 2017.
  • A male baby boomer with over 22% chances of having a college degree.

METHODOLOGY

Detailed research through credible survey studies for publicly available reports on demographics for United States consumers who are into "cool food" and lifestyle gadgets, as well as new lifestyle trends failed to uncover any helpful insights. We searched for information on age, gender, education, and household income among other details such as marital status, children (family size), occupation of United States consumers who are into "cool food" and lifestyle gadgets, as well as new lifestyle trends. There were also no publicly available insights uncovered from researching through Variety and several other credible studies. This strategy revealed a few lifestyle gadgets trends that we considered helpful. Variety revealed that the age demographics of such consumers cover those born within the period from the early 1980s until 2000 (millennial), and those born between the mid-1940s to mid-1960s (baby boomers) who want to enjoy "cool food." The publication also revealed that baby boomers are at "the top" in terms of household wealth and spending on food, noting also that millennials are tech savvy. Unfortunately, there were no statistics on the occupation of the consumers. Unfortunately, this strategy uncovered no statistics on the occupation of the studied consumer groups.

CALCULATION

(2019-1980) to (2019-2000) gave the age limit of 19 to 39 years
(2019-1960) to (2019-1940) gave the age limit of 54 to 74 years.

Further research through credible databases like American FactFinder, Pew Research Center, among other reliable databases, failed to uncover publicly available reports on demographics for United States consumers who are into "cool food" and lifestyle gadgets, as well as new lifestyle trends pertaining age, gender, education, and household income among other details such as marital status, children (family size), occupation. Insights obtained from Pew Research Center uncovered the statistics that more Americans today own mobile phones and are increasingly connected to the "world of digital information" via smartphones and other mobile devices. We considered new smartphones to be new lifestyle gadgets and mobile internet and other activities as new lifestyle trends. Unfortunately, the report did not include statistics on the demographics of United States consumers who are into "cool food." There were no insights uncovered on the occupation of the studied consumer groups.

We also researched for demographics such as gender, education, and household income among other details such as marital status, children (family size), occupation of United States consumers in the age groups of 18 to 39 years and 54 to 74 years known as millennials and baby boomers to arrive at a triangulated conclusion on the required demographics. Unfortunately, there were no statistics on the occupation of the studied age groups.

We also reviewed scholarly databases and academic literature, among other resources for research reports on the demographics for United States consumers who are in the age groups defined above for millennials and baby boomers (19 to 39 years and 54 to 74 years). Thorough research through the International Journal of Gastronomy and Food Science Volume 9, October 2017, Pages 105-109 and other academic resources indicaterd the age group made up of 18–34 year-olds prefer ice cream and cookies at 77% and 70% respectively. We ignored the food preference of the age groups 35–54 as it contains some age groups not defined by the Variety findings.

We searched for more demographics such as gender, education, and household income among other details such as marital status, children (family size), occupation of United States consumers of the age group identified as millennials and baby boomers (19 to 39 years and 54 to 74 years) already defined above. In a few cases where the age group of an uncovered demographic was one year outside our defined range, we ignored the difference due to highly limited statistics available to the public regarding the researched age groups. However, there were no statistics on the occupation of the studied age groups.

We also searched through United States Census Bureau survey programs to uncover insights into the demographics of United States consumers who are into cool food and lifestyle gadgets, as well as new lifestyle trends. The US Census data reported no insights into the required trends. Finally, we searched through the census reports for demographics on the age groups of 18 to 39 years and 54 to 74 years known as millennials and baby boomers. Relevant demographics on household earning and other information for the studied age groups were obtained from Pew Research Center surveys and reported all helpful findings as above. Unfortunately, there were no statistics on the occupation of the studied age groups.

Part
03
of four
Part
03

Food Conscious Consumer Demographics

People aged between 42 to 49 are most likely to bring their own lunch. The average age of parents packing lunch for their kids is 36.5 years old.

Demographics of people who pack their own lunch:

  • People aged between 42 to 49 are most likely to bring their own lunch.
  • Women are more likely to bring their lunch as compared to men.
  • 85% of people bring lunch more often than they buy it.
  • People working in the transportation, insurance and healthcare industries are more likely to bring their lunch.
  • The average age of parents packing lunch for their kids is 36.5 years.
  • 90% of parents packing lunch for their kids are females.
  • 57% of families packing lunch for their kids have an annual income greater than $100,000.

Demographics of people who cook at home:

Habits of people who bring lunch to work every day:

Spending habits of people who eat out for lunch:

Lunch habit of Americans:

Research Strategy:

Strategy 1: Direct Information

We started the research with directly searching for any information on the demographic analysis for U.S. consumers who do food preparation at home and bring lunch / pack their kids lunch. We came across an article that provided us with useful insights related to age, gender and occupation of those people packing their own lunch's. We also came across another article that provided us with information on the habits of people who pack their own lunch.
A white paper that was also found that provided demographic information regarding age, gender and income levels of parents that packed lunch for their kids.

Strategy 2: Demographics of people cooking at home:

Since limited information was available on people who prepare their food and pack it for work, we started to search for any demographic analysis for the people who cook at home. The idea here was to find any information related to people who do home cooking, and who also pack food for lunch at work. We came across a white paper that provided insights in the demographic analysis of people cooking at home, but it was for the overall home cooks and not specific to people packing their lunch for work or for their kids.

Strategy 3: Lunch habits of Americans:

As a last report, we started to search for any articles or reports around the lunch habits of Americans. The idea here was to find information that could be used to build a demographic analysis of people who take their own lunch as opposed to people who eat out. We came across numerous articles that provided generic information on lunch habits of Americans, but did not provide any useful information that could be used to build demographic analysis of people who pack their own lunch es.

Strategy 4: Information on people who eat out for lunch:

As a last resort, we started to search for information on people who eat out as opposed to those who bring their own lunch. The idea here was to identify any demographic feature that would contribute to the reasons why some people particularly avoid eating their lunch out and thereby, would prefer to pack their own lunch. We came across an article that provided spending habits of Americans who eat their lunch out, but no useful information could be found on the demographics of people who would rather avoid spending time out for lunch.
After exhausting the above mentioned strategies, we concluded that limited information is available on demographic analysis for U.S. consumers who do food preparation at home and bring lunch / pack their kids lunch.
We were able to provide information related to age, gender, household income and occupation for people who do food preparation at home and bring lunch / pack their kids lunch. Due to limited availability of information regarding their education, we have provided insights on the education level of people who cook at home.

WHAT INFORMATION WAS AVAILABLE

  • Information on the age, gender, income and occupation of people who pack lunch.
  • Information on demographics of people who cook at home.

WHAT INFORMATION WAS NOT AVAILABLE

  • Any information on education level, marital status and family size for people who do food preparation at home and bring lunch / pack their kids lunch.

WHY INFORMATION WHICH WAS NOT AVAILABLE PRE-COMPILED, or COULDN'T BE TRIANGULATED?

  • One of the probable reasons for the unavailability of such information could be, that since home cooking and packing lunches are a rather personal preference, no comprehensive report on the demographics are available in the public domain.
  • It could also be possible that the demographics of people who a pack lunch is similar to those who cook at home, it would be convenient for home cooks to pack their leftovers for lunch.
Part
04
of four
Part
04

Lunch Packing Tools

There was no information available in the public domain on the consumer segments that may be interested in purchasing either high-end, trendy insulated food containers or a similar container at a lower price point more appropriate for children. Below is an overview of the information that was available.

Useful findings

consumer Segment: People prone to contracting food borne illness

  • According to a study done by the Center for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC), 1 in 6 Americans, which totals to an estimated 48 million people, get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die of food borne diseases each and every year.
  • More specifically, the study determined that young children, pregnant women, and the elderly were the most prone to contract food borne illness.
  • Therefore, this segment of people can be considered as one of the consumer segments of insulated food containers as these containers help to keep food at a safe temperature until it is taken out for consumption.
  • The products catering to this consumer category are diverse in their range of prices starting from $14.99 for a purple Thermos 10-ounce Funtainer Food Jar to $36.69 for a Zojirushi SL-NCE09 Ms. Bento Stainless-Steel Vacuum Lunch Jar.

Consumer Segment: Travelers

  • People who travel long distances often carry non-perishables such as rolls, bread, and cookies or perishable food such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy products.
  • While traveling with hot foods, travelers often need containers designed to keep their food hot.
  • Also, while traveling with cold food travelers need insulated containers with a cold pack to keep the food at a temperature of 40 degrees Fahrenheit or lower.
  • Travelers also often fall prey to travelers' diarrhea and to prevent that their foods are required to be kept at the correct temperature, as noted in the American Dietetic Association's Complete Food and Nutrition Guide.
  • All these reasons combined make travelers an important consumer segment for insulated food containers and such a product, the "Thermal Insulation Lunch Box Stainless Steel Vacuum Insulated Carrier Bento Box Travel Hiking Camping Picnics Food Jar Capacity 1.4L", was sold at Amazon for $30.99.

Consumer Segment: Construction Workers

  • In the absence of an insulated food box for lunch, construction workers leave their job site at lunchtime, go to a drive-through, and eat as fast as they can.
  • Bringing lunch in a paper bag to a construction site is risky. Unlike any other job, their lunch packet can be squashed flat or exposed to dirt and/or cement (which can enter it).
  • Construction workers often work in high temperature areas and not being able to keep the food cool increases the risk of illness.
  • All these factors combined make that construction workers are in need of a rigid and insulated lunch box that has been designed for the outdoors.
  • Some insulated food containers or lunch boxes suggested for construction workers are:

Consumer Segment: Parents of Toddlers


Research Strategy

To find information specific to high-end and lower-priced products and its consumer segments, we started our search by looking for market or industry reports (such as those published in sources like Markets and Markets, GM Insights, Market Research, Mordor Intelligence) and press releases (such as Globe Newswire, PR Newswire, Businesswire). Although these sources provided the overall market size for the product, the nuanced studies relating to specific consumer segments and their preferences for high-end or low-priced products were not available for non-paying customers.

We then looked into sources such as websites, reports, annual disclosures, presentations, blogs and articles published on the websites of manufacturing companies such as Omie, Milton, Vaya Lunch, Thermos, among others. However, presumably in order not to limit the potential buyer size for any product beforehand, these companies did not publish any reports on high-end or low-priced products.

We also looked into advertising databases (such as Adforum, DMA) and advertising case study sites (such as Effie, WARC) to understand which product is marketed to which customer. However, the limited information available on the products' ad campaign did not divulge any information regarding the potential customer base the ad was targeted towards. For similar information we also looked into the social media profiles of the manufacturing companies but apart from announcing the product, the announcements did not make any public distinctions between its targeted customers.

In the absence of information as obtained from the above search strategies, we deployed the following alternate search strategies. We tried to find out the average price of an insulated food container and then tried to find out which were high-end and which were low-priced and compare them to the average. However, due to the multitude of variants available there was no readily available report on average pricing. Although the average price could be calculated based on the average of a set of products obtained from sites such as Amazon, it was difficult to ascertain which product (high-end or low-priced) exclusively catered to which category as for each consumer segment a diverse range of prices were available from low to high. Also, the prices between two consumer segments could not be compared as the products used by a construction worker was completely different from that used for a toddler in terms of physical attributes such as size and weight or in terms of its purpose or usability. Therefore, the comparisons were not feasible.

We looked into sites that provide consumer demographics mapped with product variant (such as Infoscout) or sources providing similar quantitative data (such as Nielsen, Euromonitor Database, Mintel, IBIS World). Again due to the wide multitude of products for each consumer segment these databases could not be put into use.

We searched through press releases (such as Globenewswire, Businesswire, PRNewswire, Cision) which often provide paid reports on market analysis for a diverse range of products. Two such sources on the insulated food container market were identified which were global studies of this market and had the scope of more detailed analysis of the consumer segments.

In the absence of information on the segments interested in high-end, trendy insulated products or lower price point products, we broadened the search to consumer segments of insulated food container overall. This resulted in the consumer segments listed. For an understanding of the price points, the price of products was listed without making any comparisons between each.


Sources
Sources

From Part 01
Quotes
  • "Millennials, however, are also more likely than Baby Boomers (53% vs. 34%) to say they’d be willing to forgo a brand in order to buy products that are environmentally friendly. They also find it much easier to find environmentally friendly products in the stores where they shop (74% vs. 46%)."
  • "In the U.S., there is a large gap between generations when it comes to sustainable purchase intent. When surveyed, Millennials are twice as likely (75% vs. 34%) than Baby Boomers to say they are definitely or probably changing their habits to reduce their impact on the environment. "
  • "They’re also more willing to pay more for products that contain environmentally friendly or sustainable ingredients (90% vs. 61%), organic / natural ingredients (86% vs. 59%), or products that have social responsibility claims (80% vs. 48%)."
Quotes
  • "Millennials (61 percent) expressed a greater willingness to pay more than those aged 35+ (39 percent). And those with a child under 18 in their household (53 percent) are significantly more likely to pay more than those without a child under 18 (42 percent)."
Quotes
  • "Men are less eco-friendly than women because men consider the act to be “unmanly,” a new study says."
Quotes
  • "This audience of environmentally friendly consumers is more likely to be married, with 56% being presently married"
  • "This audience also has a fondness for technology. 40% agree that their computer is a primary source of fun and entertainment and 62% agree that the internet has changed the way they spend their free time. Surprisingly, 60% agree that they like to drive, which appears to conflict with the eco-friendly way of life."
Quotes
  • "“87% [of millennials] would be more loyal to a company that helps them contribute to social and environmental issues.”"
  • "“More than 9-in-10 millennials would switch brands to one associated with a cause.”"
From Part 03
Quotes
  • "The percent of college-educated men cooking increased from 37.9% in 2003 to 51.9% in 2016, but men with less than high school education who cook did not change (33.2% in 2016)"
  • "College-educated women who cook increased from 64.7% in 2003 to 68.7% in 2016, while women with less than high school education had no change (72.3% in 2016)"
  • "Women with less education spent more time cooking per day than high-educated women, but the reverse was true for men. "
  • "Among men, the percent who cook increased for all race/ethnic groups except non-Hispanic blacks."
  • "Among both men and women, non-Hispanic blacks had the lowest percentage who cooked, and non-Hispanic others spent the greatest amount of time cooking."
  • "Home cooking in the United States is increasing, especially among men, though women still cook much more than men."
Quotes
  • "Planning healthy lunches and eating with others can lower your stress, improve your work performance and help your bank balance – not to mention improve your overall nutrition."
  • "A survey of 437 adults in the United States found those who prepared meals at home more often spent less money on food away from home, less money on food overall, and had healthier dietary intakes."
Quotes
  • "The survey found that men and students are more likely to spend money eating out. Men spend an average of $24.93 per week, compared with $15.55 for women. "
  • "Students pay $27.47 dining out every week, the highest among all groups."
  • "Americans in the South eat lunch out most often and spend $1,240 dining out every year. "
  • "Northeasterners spend $1,001 per year dining out for lunch, the second highest in the nation. Midwesterners, however, spend $866 every year, the lowest among all. "
  • "Homemakers are least likely to go out, but they tend to spend more when they do, an average of $17.60. "
Quotes
  • "A 2015 survey found that only one in five Americans actually spends their lunch break away from their desks, with most eating their midday meal while they continue to work. "
  • "On top of that, millions of Americans are skipping lunch altogether to continue working. "
Quotes
  • "The mean age of parents in the sample was 36.5 years; almost 90% of the parents included in the study were female, with 57% of the sample with an annual family income >$100,000"
From Part 04
Quotes
  • "Whether your lunch is hot or cold, a thermal food storage container can help to keep it at a safe temperature until you’re ready to dig in."
  • "The CDC estimates that about 1 in 6 Americans (or 48 million people) get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die of foodborne diseases each and every year, which makes ensuring packed lunches are kept at a safe temperature of the utmost importance. Young children, pregnant women and the elderly are all at increased risk of contracting a foodborne illness."
Quotes
  • "We as working class people, students or even as travelers are prone to eat cold food many a times. Who doesn’t like a hot meal? But keeping food hot for long hours is a challenging task. "
Quotes
  • "People traveling a long distance might bring non-perishables such as rolls, breads and cookies. Those traveling about a half hour or less can more safely bring perishable foods such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs and dairy products or foods containing these items. Nearer relatives also are a better choice for providing salads, relishes and vegetables."
  • "When traveling with food, keep HOT foods hot (140 F or higher) by wrapping them in foil, and then in heavy towels. Or, carry them in insulated wrappers or containers designed to keep food hot."
  • "Place COLD foods in a cooler with ice or freezer packs or an insulated container with a cold pack so they remain at 40 F or lower, especially if traveling over a half hour."
Quotes
  • "Without a doubt, construction site workers need a decent lunch box that can handle a bit a rough treatment. However, there’s one thing worse than a squashed lunch, and that’s when your food gets warm from sitting in the sun all day. What you really need is a rigid and insulated lunch box that’s been designed for the outdoors."
Quotes
  • "Many construction workers simply leave their job site at lunch time to go through a drive-through. As soon as they drive to the fast food restaurant, wait for their lunch, and get back to work, they are so short on time they have to eat as fast as they can. A lunch box with an already-prepared meal can eliminate this stress and also keep you healthier in the long run."
  • "Bringing your lunch to work at your construction job in a paper bag one time is enough to prove that a stronger container is necessary. By noon, your sandwiches will be squashed flat and your bag may even have dirt or cement in it. If you’ve already made this mistake, you know how important a quality adult lunch box is. If you haven’t, you can prevent it by purchasing one."
  • "Another good reason to pick a good lunch box is the danger zone in food temperatures. Bacteria can grow very quickly if your food doesn’t stay cool, increasing your risk of illness. If you pick the right choice, your lunch box can keep your food safe from this risk. Below, we will cover some of the best lunch boxes available on the market that are suitable for construction workers."
Quotes
  • "--Insulated food jars keep your baby's snacks warm (7 hours) or cold(5 hours). --Includes a handy built-in utensil holder and spork making the Skip Hop food jar the perfect food container for on-the-go. --Premium stainless steel container features an easy open twist lid that toddler's little hands can open. --Great for snacks at home, preschool, daycare or out running errands"
Quotes
  • "Perfect for busy families on the go, take our baby food storage containers everywhere. Day care, kindergarten, friends houses, the park, on day trips, camping and more. Just add the warm food to the storage pots, put on the lid and the food inside will stay warm for hours and will never leak and make a mess"