Food Insulation Trends, Audience Discovery

Part
01
of five
Part
01

Key Trends, Food Prep

Five current trends related to food preparation and food gadgets in the United States are: 1) an increasing number of Americans who are preparing their own food at home, 2) an increasing interest in preparing new recipes, 3) households that are food insecure owning less preparation gadgets, 4) food processors, cast-iron pans, slow cookers, cutting boards, nonstick pans, coffee makers, microwaves, meat thermometers, teapots and grills are the most purchased food prep gadgets, and 5) consumers are purchasing an average of 8-12 food prep gadgets per year.

trend 1: an increasing number of Americans are preparing food at home

  • Overview: In the later part of the 20th century, the rate at which Americans were preparing food at home was declining. However, in more recent years, this trend is now on the incline.
  • Research: According to the Nutrition Journal, in the 21st century, preparing food at home has increased by as much as 20%.
  • Demographics: Americans between the ages of 18 and 65, college educated men and women, all races of men, and non-Hispanic white women.

trend 2: an increasing interest in preparing new recipes

  • Overview: There is a growing trend for preparing new recipes that incorporate global flavors.
  • Research: A 2018 survey conducted by Better Homes & Gardens found that 93% of respondents try out at least one new recipe each month. Along with this, 80% say they enjoy trying new regional/ethnic food recipes. The rate at which the respondents are trying these new types of recipes has increased by 40% since 2016.
  • Demographics: American millennials and women.
  • trend 3: food insecure households own less food preparation gadgets which may have negative impact on their food security

    • Overview: Food insecure households own a fewer number of food preparation items, however the rate at which food preparation items are used is the same between food secure and food insecure households. The availability of kitchen equipment in a home may impact the food security of that home, as it may impact cooking behavior.
    • Research: The Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics reported that food insecure households own five fewer food prep items compared to food secure homes. This was found to be true across all categories of food equipment (large appliances, small appliances, food preparation utensils, and cooking utensils).
    • Demographics: American parents with children between the ages of 11 and 14 that are living in food insecure households.

    trend 4: Food processors, cast-iron pans, slow cookers, cutting boards, nonstick pans, coffee makers, microwaves, meat thermometers, teapots and grills are the most purchased food prep gadgets

    • Overview: The kitchen gadgets that are most widely purchased among U.S. consumers are microwaves, cutting boards, and coffee makers.
    • Research: A survey of 1,000 people in the U.S. conducted by Sous Vide Guy found that the following gadgets are most commonly purchased: food processors (45.8%), cast-iron pans (49.1%), slow cookers (63.5%), cutting boards (68.6%), nonstick pans (64.6%), coffee makers (65.3%), microwaves (79.4%), meat thermometers (46.2%), teapots (42.7%) and grills (56.1%). In terms of the average among spent o these gadgets, the most expensive gadgets being purchased are grills ($251), microwaves ($149), food processors ($83), coffee makers ($56), and slow cookers ($47). In terms of the gadgets that are used most often, the survey showed that microwaves are the most used (93.2% of the time), followed by cutting boards (87.6%), and nonstick pans (84.1%).
    • Demographics: Americans.

    trend 5: consumers purchase an average of 8-12 kitchen tools and gadgets per year

    • Overview: Survey results show that the number of kitchen tools/gadgets that consumers purchase seems to remain fairly constant over the years.
    • Research: An annual survey of U.S. consumers asked respondents to state how many kitchen tools and gadgets they had purchased within the past three months; each year respondents have routinely given an average answer between two and three gadgets (in other words, 8-12 per year). Additionally, the majority of kitchen gadget purchases are planned (63.2%) compared to impulse buys. This trend has also remained fairly stable over the years. When purchasing the gadget, consumers say they usually make a decision about the specific brand and item they are going to buy while they are at the store looking at the available items (64%) rather than making this decision before heading to the store. However, this trend has been decreasing somewhat over the years.
    • Demographics: Primary grocery shoppers in U.S. households.

    RESEARCH STRATEGY

    To conduct this research, we analyzed a series of consumer surveys, academic studies, and market reports that discuss current and evolving food preparation and gadget trends among the U.S. consumer base. While there was a lot of useful information available on this topic in general, one aspect of the request that we were unable to locate data for was in regard to the location demographics concerning which people are being affected by the trends (i.e. urban, suburban, rural). In attempting to do so, the following three research approaches were tried:

    1) We attempted to look for resources that reported trends specific to food preparation in cities/apartments/urban areas and country cooking (rural), however, we were unable to locate any sufficient insights that were related to food preparation or gadgets specifically. We also analyzed the sample size demographics of general surveys to note any breakdown of urban, suburban, rural respondents, however, none of the surveys we located provided this type of breakdown.

    2) We attempted to look for resources that reported trends specific to food preparation in specific cities, states, and regions (e.g. southern cooking) of the U.S., however, while there were some food related trends to this effect, we found that these trends were not related to the actual process of food preparation and gadgets being used, but instead were more on the use of certain ingredients and flavor preferences.

    3) Lastly, we attempted to look for resources that reported on trends specific to food preparation connected to certain styles of cooking that could be connected to a geographical region, such as creole style food preparation or seafood preparation (coastal regions), etc. However, once again, while we were able to identify some food related trends to this effect, we did not find sufficient information that discussed trends revolving around the actual process of preparing food, but rather, the trends were focused on dining.

    Despite this lack of geo-specific insights, we were able to find a number of solid food preparation trends that are specific to the U.S. demographic as a whole, as well as some more targeted types of trends relative to specific sub-demographics of Americans. Therefore, we opted to focus on providing these trends, as we found they were significantly more relevant to actual food preparation trends rather than eating and dining.
    Part
    02
    of five
    Part
    02

    Food Prep Demographics

    Millennials are the most involved in food prep trends, gadgets, and related services.

    MAJOR CONSUMER SEGMENT: MILLENNIALS

    AGE

    GENDER

    • Women perform the majority of the food prepping.

    OTHER MILLENNIALS DEMOGRAPHICS

    Research Strategy:

    We couldn't find extensive information on the demographics of major consumers that are into food prep or meal prep trends or gadgets and services related to meal prep. We found that this required consumer segment comprises Millennials and we found useful demographic data for these selected consumers as directly related to food prep.

    We started our research by looking for precompiled demographic data. We explored trusted databases, nutrition, statistics, and demographics websites including Market Research, Statista, and data.gov. We thoroughly scoured these sources with the intention of putting together all relevant information found in precompiled demographic data to form detailed findings. Also, most of the demographic information was more specific to fast food and commercial food prep as opposed to homemade food prep gadgets, trends and others or general food prep. However, most of the information available on this topic found via this search were psychographic data and very little demographic data.

    Secondly, we switched to searching for Millennials food prep related trends. We expected to find demographic information among the equally expected psychographic data. This proved correct and we were able to obtain some useful findings. We found a very useful article on the website of an industry leader, BlueChip. Although there were lots of useful findings in the article, we ensured to strictly limit our findings to the demographic data requested.

    Next, we searched for the key players in the food prep gadget industry and likewise, the top food prep services in an attempt to look them up one after another to extract demographic information about their major customers. We looked through business, financial, statistics, and market research databases like Crunchbase, Statista, and Forbes. The detailed demographic information required seemed to all be behind a paywall. We were able to find the top players in the industry but unable to acquire the necessary information from our further research on them.

    After that, we decided to look for each of the necessary demographic information one after another having acquired that of age (Millennials). We searched through the databases and websites mentioned before and extended to general searches for the social status, marital status of the major consumers and so on. What we found was the exact same information as obtained from previous searches. Eventually, we had to resort to generalized Millennials demographics. This we found from Pew Research.




    Part
    03
    of five
    Part
    03

    Food & Lifestyle Consumer, Psychographics & Media Preferences

    Using study and survey data, we found three distinct groups in the United States that are considered adopters of new lifestyle and food trends. Those groups are vegans, foodies, and Generation Z. Members of these groups tend to be environmentally friendly, conscious of health and wellness, Internet savvy, and very open to new experiences; they consume a great deal of Internet media when food shopping.

    VEGANS

    • According to data from CivicScience (via William Reed’s FoodNavigator), 40% of surveyed vegans reported interest in trying new products as early adopters. Comparatively, only 32% and 24% of vegetarian and omnivore respondents, respectively, answered similarly.

    • CivicScience also found that 33% of vegan respondents considered food as both a fuel and lifestyle statement. Comparatively, only 17% and 15% of vegetarian respondents and those that identified as neither vegan nor vegetarian, respectively, answered similarly.

    • Twenty-six percent of vegan respondents indicated that brand loyalty was a greater influence on purchasing decisions than price.

    • Finally, CivicScience reports that 53% of vegan respondents indicated that they adjust their lifestyle to help the environment, which strongly suggests a tendency towards environmental friendliness.

    FOODIES

    • According to data from Market Research Reports, foodies consider food to be a part of their lifestyle statement and personal identity.

    • Foodies enjoy the thrill of new trends, not just those that are food-related. Additionally, foodies are tech-savvy consumers that act as trend ambassadors to their communities and peers.


    • Additionally, foodies have a passion for understanding their food. Foodies want to know where their food comes from, how it's grown, the food's cultural and historical context, and even the careers of its preparers (i.e., chefs and restaurateurs).

    • Foodies are large consumers of Internet media vis-à-vis their food shopping; video displays and shopping cart ads closely follow Internet media consumption.

    GENERATION Z

    • Brian Sullivan, senior VP of California Pizza Kitchen’s culinary innovation division, notes that Generation Z has a strong desire to try all that is new. But they also desire authenticity, Instragrammability, and fun.

    • When it comes to ingredients, they are a savvy group, but Generation Z also wants to be treated like adults in the food and lifestyle sphere.

    OTHER US ADULTS

    • Though we identified three distinct groups, an older study from Pew Research Center reports that 35% of American adult respondents in the general populace enjoy the experience of trying new products. Three-in-ten respondents reported enjoyment in acting as new product ambassadors similar to foodies.

    • Fifteen percent of respondents indicated a willingness to be the first adopters of new technology. Generally, adults with higher openness to experiences correlated to early technology adoption; extroverts demonstrated a higher preference for new technology than introverts.

    • Furthermore, Pew data show that 37% of respondents indicated a strong preference to being early adopters of new food products. This group also demonstrated a similar correlation between openness to new experiences and early adoption of new food products.

    ADDITIONAL FINDINGS

    • New Hope Network (a market research and consulting firm) found that new products are more likely to resonate with consumers if the former incorporates a value that is important to the latter; such as, operational transparency, social purpose, nutrition, and environmental stewardship.

    • New Hope Network’s research discovered that there is a category of consumers that takes aggressive actions toward health and wellness. These consumers also tend to be early adopters but also switch brands impulsively.
    Part
    04
    of five
    Part
    04

    Eco Conscious Consumer Psychographics & Media Preferences

    Eco-conscious consumers believe that making eco-friendly purchases are either better for their health or better in quality than other non-eco-friendly products, are interested in the news and media, want to be positive role models to their family and friends, and are likely to engage in eco-conscious habits such as water conservation and recycling. They also prefer to use Facebook and are subscribed to mailing lists and publications related to green consumerism.

    Psychographics of Eco-Conscious consumers

    KEY OPINIONS:
    • About 6 in 10 eco-conscious consumers believe that making eco-friendly purchases are either better for their health while 4 in 10 believe that the products they purchase are better in quality than other non-eco-friendly products.
    • About 8 in 10 eco-conscious consumers make eco-friendly brand choices because they care for the future of the planet and believe that we should respect other living creatures.
    INTERESTS:
    VALUES:
    BEHAVIORS:
    • Among 2,000 eco-conscious Americans across three generations who were surveyed regarding their eco-conscious habits, 9 in 10 believed that recycling makes an impact.
    • About 9 in 10 eco-conscious millennials are likely to spend more for products that contain environmentally friendly or sustainable/organic/natural ingredients while only 6 in 10 eco-conscious baby boomers are likely to do the same.
    • 8 in 10 eco-conscious millennials are likely to pay more for products that have claims of social responsibility while only 5 in 10 eco-conscious baby boomers are willing to do the same.

    MEDIA USAGE/PREFERENCES OF Eco-Conscious Consumers

    • While 53% of eco-conscious consumers attribute word-of-mouth from family and friends as the influence that led them to become more eco-conscious, TV shows (48%) and news/media sources (48%) are also shown to be influential in their choices.
    • As seen on the social media statistics of website visitors of MNN, Greenpeace, and Green America, whose visitors are primarily from the US, eco-conscious consumers are likely to be on Facebook.
    • The analysis of the audience statistics of sites such as MNN and Green America shows that eco-conscious consumers are likely to subscribe to mailing lists and publications of websites they visit as evidenced by the fact that mailing list links and subscription links are one of the top five other visited websites of their audiences.

    YOUR TEAM APPLIED THE FOLLOWING RESEARCH STRATEGY

    To find the psychographics and media preferences of consumers of eco-conscious/sustainable living, products, and services, we leveraged our insights on readily available survey reports and news articles available in the public domain. Next, to gather more insights about this specific segment of consumers, we analyzed some websites related to green consumerism. Through a website analytics tool, we were able to determine the top environmental websites according to the total traffic received. We made sure that the chosen sites we analyzed are active; have an audience that is primarily from the USA; and most importantly, promote eco-conscious or sustainable living practices, products, and services. Through this strategy, we were able to identify Greenpeace and Mother Nature Network as part of the top environmental websites, with which we can assume that eco-conscious consumers frequent these two sites. We have also determined Green America as another site that is frequented by eco-conscious consumers as it has been recognized as one of the best non-profit organizations on sustainability and its site analytics shows that it receives a monthly visitor of up to 143,330, which is on par with the monthly visits of Greenpeace at 110,091. Using the audience statistics found from these websites, we were able to determine some common interests, preferences, and behavior among their different audiences and made the assumption that these apply to the general eco-conscious consumer.
    Part
    05
    of five
    Part
    05

    Food Prep, Psychographics & Media Preferences

    American consumers who prepare or cook food at home and bring lunch or pack their kids' lunch are conscious and more concerned with cost savings, health and wellness, family time and the environment. In terms of media preferences, these people are internet savvy as they turn to cook blogs and websites, and social media for food inspiration and how-to information; and mobile applications due to their adoption to meal-kit delivery services. According to ReportLinker, cooking at home is still the preferred way to prepare a meal for 98% of Americans.

    Cost Savings

    • About 31% of Americans who frequently cook at home said that lower cost motivates them to cook at home while 22% say their desire for healthy fare drives them into the kitchen.
    • Peapod also revealed that 77% of respondents said they cook at home to save money, which makes it the top reason for cooking at home rather than dining out.
    • According to a Share Our Strength study as part of their Cooking Matters program, 85% of low to middle-income families also said that food prices were the most significant barriers to healthier cooking.

    Healthier Diet

    • Additionally, one in five Americans said they prefer cooking at home because it gives them better control over what they eat.
    • Another study by Peapod found that 51% of those surveyed who cook at home said they eat at home to be healthier.
    • “Amongst middle to upper-income families, food allergies and new dietary guidelines have become key factors to cooking at home. In 2014, 28% of shoppers looked for foods that were minimally processed, 26% looked for ingredients they knew and 25% looked for locally grown goods.”

    More Family time

    • Family time was the third benefit seen by respondents with 41% of those surveyed saying cooking at home offers more quality time at home with family, and millennials showing the most interest (48%)."
    • These findings were also supported by another study citing the need for a personal connection with friends and family, saving money and developing better eating habits as the reasons why American consumers are heading back to the kitchen.

    Food Enthusiasts — Health and Environment Conscious

    • According to a study from a group of researchers in the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a certain group of Americans called 'food enthusiasts' tend to be the most frequent home cookers as 54% of them cook at least once a day, while only 28% of the general population cook as often.
    • They are considered adventurous consumers; they visit farmers’ markets and buy organic food most frequently.
    • They also pay the most attention to labels when shopping for food.
    • Food enthusiasts also highly value healthiness, safety and freshness of foods and put less concern to convenience.
    • They are most likely to go to fitness clubs (35%).
    • They are also environmentally conscious as they have higher knowledge about alternative agriculture and most likely to be sustainable food shoppers.
    • This group also follows a special diet to treat illness to keep fit.
    • They are also religious concerned.

    Lunch Boxes

    • Those kids with parents who had a greater awareness of nutritional guidelines tended to bring more fruits in their lunches throughout the week and more servings of vegetables on Mondays.
    • "When parents scored high on 'authoritative parenting practices,' meaning they were more apt to show warmth and be involved in their kids’ lives and responsive to their needs. Their kids were found to bring more vegetables to school in their lunches — except, again, on Mondays. This may be a matter of parents setting boundaries that respond to kids’ preferences and needs, researchers say."

    MEDIA PREFERENCES

    • According to different studies, people who prepare food at home and bring their kids' lunch prefer the internet as their source of information.
    • Blogs and websites :
      • 17% of Americans who frequently cook at home are internet savvy as they turn to cooking blogs and websites for inspiration compared to TV shows and food networks at 10%.
      • Also, one-third of millennials who have a high interest in cooking at home said that they turn to cooking blogs and websites for inspiration.

    • Social Media:
      • According to Sopexa, foodies are re-owning the kitchen and rediscovering the pleasure and creativity of home cooking as 75% cook at home several times a week and 93% cook daily for themselves and their family as opposed to eating out.
      • Foodies use social media, employing them more than 7 times a day to obtain inspiration and admiration.
      • For seeking ideas and displaying their creativity, foodies unanimously use Facebook (90%) and Instagram (73%), then Pinterest (36%) and Twitter (19%).
      • As for millennials, YouTube is their source of information for cooking as millennials have subscribed en masse to food channels on YouTube, and 75% of the growth in viewership is coming from mobile devices.
      • “How-to content related to food on YouTube is incredibly popular, with 419 million views in 2014. "How to Cook That" is one of the ten most popular how-to searches on YouTube. It's also the name of a popular YouTube food channel, where Ann Reardon dishes out whimsical desserts weekly to more than 1.6 million fans.”
    • Mobile and Smartphones:
      • According to a McGarryBowen and Kraft Foods study, millennials are cooking more and applying to their I-want-to-do attitudes to cooking.
      • 59% of 25- to 34-year-old cook with either their smartphones or tablets handy as they are turning to their mobiles to get all the information and guidance they need.
      • Another media preference for this group, relative to the internet, is mobile applications. This is due to their adaptation to meal-kit delivery services.
      • Meal-kit delivery services is a subscription service that packages ingredients together with recipes and deliver a kit right to the cook’s doorstep and can be accessed through mobile apps.
      • According to Peapod, 47% of the adults surveyed plan to take advantage of one of the following options next year: click-and-collect grocery shopping (27%), home grocery delivery (26%) and/or meal kit delivery (20%).


    Sources
    Sources

    From Part 02
    Quotes
    • "Millennial shoppers purchase a larger share of prepared foods, pasta and sweets at the grocery store than other generations, according to USDA data analysis."
    • "According to the agency, this demographic spends 13.6% of their at-home food budgets on these three categories, while Generation X members spend 12.6% and Baby Boomers 11.5%."
    Quotes
    • "NPD says that as these millennials start their own households and have kids, they're still interested in fresh food and want some sort of food prep involvement."
    Quotes
    • "Millennials eat largest share of fast food and are most likely to spend more on purchased prepped meals. It's not surprising to find then, that millennials allocate the highest share of their food budgets to prepared food (7.5% vs 6.6-6.9% for the other generations)," they added."
    From Part 03
    Quotes
    • "The results were somewhat different than those about technology. On this index, some 37% of U.S. adults have strong preferences toward being early adopters of food products, 38% are in the middle, and 25% have weak early-adopter preferences, indicating they prefer familiar food products."
    • "Some 16% of U.S. adults have strong preferences for trying both new food and technology products. Another 12% of adults have strong early-adopter preferences for technology, but not for food products."
    • "Personality also matters. Those with high openness to new experiences are more inclined to have strong preferences for trying both new food and technology products (21% do so among those with higher openness to experience compared with 13% among those with lower openness)."
    Quotes
    • "Market research found new products are most likely to resonate with shoppers if they contain a value that's important to consumers, such as transparency, social purpose and environmental stewardship."
    • "Increasingly, shoppers are not only considering the functional use of a product, but whether it possesses traits they value personally, including transparency, social purpose, nutrition and environmental stewardship, according to research presented by market research and consulting firm New Hope Network at the Natural Products Expo East conference in Baltimore."
    • "The second category, the #young4ever segment, caters to people who take aggressive actions toward health and wellness, and tend to be early adopters and impulsive brand switchers."
    Quotes
    • "A closer look by CivicScience at the “anatomy of a vegan” provides insights into their motivations and could help plant-based product manufacturers more effectively reach their targets. Specifically, it found vegans tend to be environmentally friendly with 53% saying that they adjust their lifestyle to help the environment."
    • "Vegans also are passionate and are more likely to consider food as fuel and a lifestyle statement, according to CivicScience. Its survey found 33% of vegans consider food to be their “passion and an essential part of my lifestyle and identity,” compared to just 17% of vegetarians and 15% of respondents who identify as neither vegan nor vegetarian."
    • "Other good news for manufacturers and restaurants catering to vegans is CivicScience found they tend to be much more brand-loyal and are more often early adopters than non-vegans. When shopping, 26% vegans report that brand “by a lot” is more important than price when shopping, compared to just 8% of vegetarians and 4% of omnivores. Price can still be a pain point though, as illustrated by CivicScience nding between 23% and 28% of all respondents saying they prioritize price “by a lot” over brand. "
    • "Finally, CivicScience found 40% of vegans count as early adopters because they usually try new products, compared to only 32% of vegetarians and 24% of omnivores."
    Quotes
    • "'Some foodies don’t think of themselves as trendy, but overall they are open-minded, curious, and eager to experiment with the new. Research shows that they are significantly more likely than average adults to be the first among their friends to shop at new stores or try new styles,' says Tatjana Meerman, publisher of Packaged Facts."
    • "Outside interests exist, but for Foodies it always comes back to pleasing the palate. For them food is more than body fuel. It is what defines who they are in a greater society. "
    • "Foodies enjoy the thrill of the hunt and being the first to catch on to new food trends, and food outlets considered 'authentic' carry the most prestige in the foodie world. At the same time, foodies are a desirable demographic, as they are avid, tech-savvy consumers who embrace all sorts of trends, not just those that are food-related, and who introduce these trends to their communities and peers."
    • "Moreover, foodies tend to stay close to population centers; they are, for example, 24% more likely to own a condo or co-op (index of 124), indicating a skew to downtown areas. One mark of the foodie character is that foodies like to learn about what they eat—where a food physically comes from, how it’s grown and comes to market, cooking techniques, the historical and cultural provenance of a dish or of entire cuisines, and the career arcs of chefs and restaurateurs. "
    • "Foodies are a receptive audience when it comes to the types of food marketing to which they “sometime or always” refer, posting above average indexes across the board for more than a dozen types of media. Once again reflected here is the group’s Web-savviness, with the Internet topping the list of food shopping media that appeal disproportionately to foodies, at 36% above the U.S. norm (index of 136). Other effective marketing methods include video monitor displays (index of 127) and ads on shopping carts (index of 115). "
    • "At the same time, foodies do make a couple of nods to economizing, being significantly above average to agree strongly that they are often swayed by coupons to try new foods (index of 268) and that eating fast food helps them stay in budget (index of 290). Overall, however, foodies seem to be rather impulsive shoppers inclined to equate higher prices with quality."
    Quotes
    • "All three of the brands we spoke to say that they are using their nonalcoholic menu development as a way to entice Gen Z consumers. It makes sense, knowing that this generation seeks out authenticity, Instagrammability and fun, familiar flavors. Sullivan says that beverage is a big part of their menu development strategy, with offerings like Sparkling Watermelon-Lime and Cucumber Reviver. "
    • "They’re savvy about ingredients, and they like to be treated like adults,” he says. No kiddie cocktails—instead, Lazy Dog carries its non-alc list on its bar menu, demonstrating the craftmanship behind the beverages."
    From Part 04
    Quotes
    • "About half of the digital consumers we interviewed in the UK and U.S. said they consider the environment when they make a purchase decision."
    • "6 in 10 believe eco-friendly products are likely to be better for their health, while about 40% think they are better quality."
    • "A fair share also want to be a positive role model for friends or family, perhaps showing that some consumers buy eco-friendly because of the image and social status associated by doing so; it allows them to obtain group influence and be respected by their peers."
    • "The results indicate that customer behavior amongst older age groups are more likely to think eco-friendly products are good for their health, while younger groups are more likely to associate them higher-quality. But whilst acknowledging these emotional responses with psychological and personal factors, the proportion who buy eco-friendly products on a regular basis is because they care about the planet is consistently high across all of the age groups in our customer reviews."
    Quotes
    • "When it comes to our most precious resource, Boomers are leading the most conservative path by showering and running the dishwasher the least-Gen-Xers are most likely to shower more than 7 times in a week. Millennials are keeping their jeans as fresh as possible by never or rarely washing them, which helps cut down on water waste."
    • "According to the survey, more than 90% of all three generations agree that recycling makes a difference. However, Gen-Xers are coming up short with a zero score, whereas Boomers and Millennials tie for first with two points apiece. Millennials are most likely to use paper billing and reusable bags, cutting down on excess paper products, and Boomers are more likely to recycle electronics like cell phones, according to survey results."
    From Part 05
    Quotes
    • "But cooking remains popular for two noteworthy reasons: it’s inexpensive and healthier. Thirty-one percent of Americans say the lower cost motivates them to cook at home, while 22% say their desire for healthy fare drives them into the kitchen, according to the survey. One in five Americans say they prefer cooking at home because it gives them better control over what they eat."
    • "In addition, 28% of all Americans say they prefer to use their own recipes, rather than turn to cooking blogs and websites for inspiration. "
    • "Still, although Millennials are often beginners, they do seek opportunities to learn how to cook new dishes. For example, a third say they turn to cooking blogs and websites for inspiration. But one of the more interesting avenues they’re exploring are meal-kit delivery services."
    • "This emerging trend is led by startups such as prepared meals, a subscription service that packages ingredients together with recipes and delivers a kit right to the cook’s doorstep. Kits range in price from $60 to $140 and include up to four recipes a week for a family of four. All ingredients are farm-fresh and pre-measured. With little effort, even a subscriber with no cooking skills can prepare a meal of Spicy Cauliflower, Potatoes, and Egg Tostadas or Pan-Fried Francese-Style Chicken."
    Quotes
    • "In terms of the segment names, “food enthusiasts” correspond roughly to adventurous consumers; they visit farmers’ markets and buy organic food most frequently. "
    • "“Food enthusiasts” are a group of consumers who highly value healthiness, safety and freshness of foods. People who consider these three food characteristics to be “very important” are 87%, 93% and 99%, respectively. In comparison, these percentages of the whole sample are 73%, 84% and 51%, respectively. “Food enthusiasts” tend to be the most frequent home cookers of all the four consumer groups. "
    • "They value the healthiness and safety of food but do not value convenience as much as others do. 18% of them shop regularly at farmers’ markets. They are more likely than average to buy organic food: 10% of them are regular organic food shoppers and 56% of them are occasional organic food shoppers. “Practical consumers” like cooking; more than 92% of them cook at least three times per week from raw ingredients. 29% of “practical consumers” follow a special diet because of health concerns, 32% of them follow a special diet because of weight loss or fitness concerns."
    • "This finding is correlated with the fact that 81% of “food enthusiasts” do not consider the convenience of food to be very important. Most “food enthusiasts” (71%) enjoy cooking very much. "
    • "Among the four consumer groups, “food enthusiasts” are most likely to go to fitness club (35%). Their environmental concern levels as well as knowledge about alternative agriculture are also the highest."
    • "Overall, “food enthusiasts” are the most likely to be sustainable food shoppers. Their high concerns about healthiness and active involvement in health practices can be an explanation of their shopping patterns. Furthermore, their high concerns about environmental issues may be associated with their preference for sustainable food."
    Quotes
    • "More than three-quarters (77%) of the 1,003 adults (501 mean and 502 women, aged 18 and older) surveyed said they would rather eat a homemade meal than go out for dinner, with 59% of millennial-aged respondents prioritizing cooling more meals at home next year."
    • "The top reason for cooking at home rather than dining is the cost savings of preparing your own meal, 77% of respondents said they cook at home to save money. Over half (51%) of those surveyed said they eat at home to be healthier. Family time was the third benefit seen by respondents with 41% of those surveyed saying cooking at home offers more quality time at home with family, and millennials showing the most interest (48%)."
    • "According to Peapod, 47% of the adults surveyed plan to take advantage of one of the following options next year: click-and-collect grocery shopping (27%), home grocery delivery (26%) and/or meal kit delivery (20%)."
    Quotes
    • "While numerous studies indicate that in the past decade, Americans haven’t been able to be bothered with at-home food preparation, cultural and socioeconomic influences on U.S. lifestyles show that consumers are heading back to the kitchen in order to meet their need for personal connection to friends and family, saving money and developing better eating habits."
    • "More Americans starting to cook at home is primarily driven by financial reasons across all income brackets. In 2014, a North Carolina State University sociology study found that for many Americans, the ability to save money and achieve dietary diversity outweigh the “inconveniences’ of meal prep time (5). For low to middle income families, the shaky economy has forced them to prepare as much food at home as possible. There are currently 17.5 million food insecure households relying on federal or food pantry assistance (6), and the ability to feed their families has led 78% of low to middle income families to cook and eat dinner at home five or more nights a week. (7) Making food affordable is a strategy that is leveraged by Trade Joe’s. 85% of Trader Joe’s goods are private label (11). By offering healthy, low cost food options that shoppers can’t find anywhere else, the grocer is able to appeal to a wide audience of customers while competing with Sprouts and Whole Foods."
    • "In a study conducted by Share Our Strength as part of their Cooking Matters program, the organization found that 85% of low to middle income families also said that food prices were the most significant barriers to healthier cooking (8). In 2013, Harvard School of Public Health found that by adding $1.50 more a day to their food allowances would enable families facing financial hardships to eat a healthy diet versus an unhealthy diet. That adds up to about $45 per month or $550 a year (10)."
    • "As Americans work more, they’ve begun to look for areas where they can slow down. Meal preparation falls into this category. From the slow food movement to the celebration of regional cuisines that focus on local and farm-raised foods, 67% of Americans have begun spending more time at home with their families and 44% have entertained friends at home instead of going out. ("
    • "Amongst middle to upper income families, food allergies and new dietary guidelines have become key factors to cooking at home. In 2014, 28% of shoppers looked for foods that were minimally processed, 26% looked for ingredients they knew and 25% looked for locally grown goods (13)."
    • "From organically grown produce to humanely raised animals, consumers are actively tracing the origins of their food."
    Quotes
    • "Kids whose parents had greater awareness of nutritional guidelines tended to bring more fruits in their lunches throughout the week and more servings of vegetables on Mondays, although vegetable portions declined as the week went on. The researchers suggest that parents may get discouraged, stressed or feel budget constraints as the week goes on."
    • "When parents scored high on “authoritative parenting practices,” meaning they were more apt to show warmth and be involved in their kids’ lives and responsive to their needs, their kids were found to bring more vegetables to school in their lunches — except, again, on Mondays. This may be a matter of parents setting boundaries that respond to kids’ preferences and needs, researchers say."
    • "Financial stress appeared to play a pronounced role as well. "Families that had financial stressors were more likely to never pack a vegetable during the week and packed fewer servings on Monday, perhaps because they don't have access to healthy food available at home," Sutter said in the release."
    • "One theory posited by the researchers: Parents with limited resources may hesitate to send fruits and vegetables off in their kids’ lunches, having no way to know if their kids will actually eat the healthy items. Instead, they may prefer to avoid potential waste and offer fruits and veggies at family meals, where they can make sure they are consumed."
    Quotes
    • "Foodies are democratizing gastronomy through their extensive use of social media, which they employ more than 7 times a day to quench their thirst for inspiration and admiration. For seeking ideas and displaying their creativity, foodies unanimously use Facebook (90%) and Instagram (73%), then Pinterest (36%) and Twitter (19%)."
    Quotes
    • "Millennials are bringing their I-want-to-do attitudes and their mobile devices into the kitchen. They’re turning to mobile at every phase of the cooking journey—deciding what to make, learning how to prepare it, and actually cooking or baking—and smart brands are there to help in each micro-moment."
    • "Through research with mcgarrybowen and Kraft Foods, we found that, while people over 35 are more likely to print out a recipe,1 59% of 25- to 34-year-olds cook with either their smartphones or tablets handy.2"
    • "The smartphone is becoming the ultimate sous-chef for millennials who are taking an I-want-to-do attitude into the kitchen. Our research indicates that online 25- to 34-year-olds (how we're defining millennials here) prefer the culinary process as much as the finished dish: They want to dive into everything, experiment with new recipes, and learn new skills."
    • "Forty-one percent of the millennials we surveyed are interested in them.6 Popular examples range from coffee hacks to Oreo hacks6. YouTube creator CrazyRussianHacker is a master of the food hack genre. His "Food Life Hacks" playlist—where he teaches his fans how to do everything from cook eggs in the microwave to awesome ways to cut a watermelon—has more than 545K views (at the time of writing)."
    • "Once the evening's menu is set, the how-do-I-actually-make-it moment strikes, and millennials look for help on Google Search or YouTube. Millennials have subscribed en masse to food channels on YouTube, and 75% of the growth in viewership is coming from mobile devices.9 How-to content related to food on YouTube is incredibly popular, with 419M views in 2014.10 "How to Cook That" is one of the ten most popular how-to searches on YouTube (behind "how to draw," "how to kiss," and "how to tie a tie").11 It's also the name of a popular YouTube food channel, where Ann Reardon dishes out whimsical desserts weekly to more than 1.6M fans (at the time of writing)."